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How much does your suspension compress?

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So I've been spending the last year and a half messing around with my clickers trying to get everything right only to find out today that my sag is way off, it finally makes sense now why I couldn't get anything to ballance. So basically I am going to start all over back at square one.

Let's say your putzing around in first gear, standing up, and then you pounce up and down on your foot pegs, if you know what I mean. Do your shock and forks compress even with each other? Do they rebound even with each other? Does one rebound faster than the other? I know that this is a very crude guideline but I want to ask anyway. I have my setting so messed up right now that my shock dosent even compress when you push on the seat with your hand! I can't believe it took me 6 years to take an interest in suspension, I really believed I could have saved some broken bones if I would have looked into it earlier

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A common test it to stand next to the bike , with the front brake applied , you press hard on the foot peg and both should compress and rebound at similar speeds

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In your stand up on the pegs bounce test...

My shock always compresses more than my fork. Reason is that I prefer fork springs on the stiff side of the useable range for my weight.

Both rebound at about the same speed.

Bike = YZ250. Me = 165 lbs.

Spring rates: 0.45 in fork, 4.9 in shock.

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Getting lost on setup is so common it's normal. There many methods to make improvements to handling. If you get lost on sag or fork/front height, then something to consider is to find some flat ground, and do some circle testing. With the rear nicely power sliding you should be able to adjust your turn radius with ease by adjusting throttle, chassis lean, and your body position. If riding MX then most riders won't like a setup inclined to oversteer (turn in too easily). Get it right, then go back to the bumps and tune the clickers.

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Might have to try that. Anyone know what a 06 crf250r is sprung for? I am 155 in street cloths so It should be sprung correctly right? Even with the springs being 8 years old

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So I got someone to grab some measurements for me...my rider sag is only 85mm, but my free sag is 45mm! What's going on? I heard some squeaking down there. Either my linkage is in serious need of grease or my shock really needs a rebuild or both. Anyone have any input?

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Linkage sounds like it needs grease or swing arm bearings

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Where in SD are you? I like traveling to races and new tracks, maybe I could come out and ride with and help with clickers. I would venture a guess, that if the bike wants to sag on its own, then it should sag with rider weight as well. Bottom line , sag is just a number, top line is find what works for u.

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I normally subscribe to "use what works for you" but there are limits to that, and sometimes we don't know what good really is, so cannot compare.

 

I think that sag measurements of 85/45 means that either:

 

1. The pivot bearings have massive friction.

2. The spring is insanely stiff for his weight.

3. He measured it wrongly.

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Where in SD are you? I like traveling to races and new tracks, maybe I could come out and ride with and help with clickers. I would venture a guess, that if the bike wants to sag on its own, then it should sag with rider weight as well. Bottom line , sag is just a number, top line is find what works for u.

I am by aberdeen. That would be neat. I always ride solo so I never know what I look like. Been thinking about sending my stuff to FC mods in Sioux falls, or tea rather. You ever heard anything bout them

I normally subscribe to "use what works for you" but there are limits to that, and sometimes we don't know what good really is, so cannot compare.

I think that sag measurements of 85/45 means that either:

1. The pivot bearings have massive friction.

2. The spring is insanely stiff for his weight.

3. He measured it wrongly.

Well when I took my shock off I tried to move the swing arm around without the shock and I can bearly move it. I am guessing this is my main problem. Now I don't even know if I want the shock rebuilt or not. How easy is the swing arm supposed to move without the shock?

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Should move up and down with no effort but the weight of the swingarm... those bushing and bearings are shot.

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And your 480 miles away... so prolly wont be up there this year. Lol

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In addition to what kxjim wrote about the movement and friction in the bearings - with shock and rear wheel and brake caliper removed, the swingarm and complete linkage should move freely up/down when you lift the axle dropout with one finger.

You might be in for an awful time pulling it all apart. Many threads on the topic here on TT.

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Find a small press to get the bearings out. It will save you a lot of time and headache.

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well, if they are that tight, I might recommend a air hammer/chisel that swingarm axle/bolt is hollow, so stick a small bolt in it that will fit through the bushings, and maybe air hammer it out. If it wont rotate/move, then good luck.

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Well I wrenched on it for 7 hours today. Found out a bolt was to tight that was binding up the system as a whole. I could have just lossened it up and been fine but while I was that deep with the subframe off and everything I took the linkage apart and pack grease everywhere. It is showroom plush feeling now. I don't even wanna know how long I was riding it like that. I was always bewildered why I couldn't handle even the smallest chop, well today I found out why. that bolt is a bugger because if it's to tight it pinches that other piece into it causing it to bind. I circled it in the pic . It's crazy to know how easy it is to over tighten, if you go even a little past snug is binds up. Also I didn't notice a bearing in that whole unit, it's all just bushings.

Had company show up right on time to help me set sag. I'm at 105/35 now. Also noticed my left can was completely out of packing. The neighbors would be pleased to know that I repacked it.

1408415149429.jpg

Edited by Berm-Saw

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ahhh, thought u were talking about swingarm bearing, not linkage bearing, LOL... when you do the bearings, remove all the rollers, and clean out the old grease. when it dries out, it turns into this hard waxy substance that wont allow the new grease to penetrate between the rollers.

Even though the arc of the linkages only allows the needles to rotate a fraction, they still need to be able to be free... and rotate that fraction.

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glad u got it figured anyway. I guess I wont come that way now... you prolly whoop my ass with new suspension.

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I wouldn't be so sure about that ha, I have been riding it like that for years! So embarrassing. I was just used to 3 inches of suspension travel and now I have 12, I am gonna have to re-learn everything. Oooo wonder where I would be at had it been working how it's supposed to all those years. Lesson learned for sure.

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It should not bind if it's just a tad tight

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