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Why has this RickyStator failed?

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I'm sorry if this has been covered, but I've spent several hours searching and haven't been able to find a definitive answer to a similar question.

 

I purchased  a new stator and regulator from Ricky Stator in September 2013 for a DRZ400. I do the service work on this bike for a friend of mine.  When he first brought it to me (in September 2013), it was in very good physical condition as he is an older man who rides it very softly, mostly to commute to work. But, I don't think it had been serviced regularly enough as he had stuck to the Suzuki recommended service intervals of every 5000 kilometres. I race KTM's in enduro, motocross and desert racing and I rarely let my 4 stroke oil do more than about 300-500k's, so I can't fathom using the same oil in a dirt bike for 5000k's. I'm now changing my friend's oil for him every 1000k's.

 

The bike came to me with a failed OEM Suzuki stator. This was the second stator that this bike has had. My friend purchased the bike new, and at that time, it had done 29,000k's.

 

The bike has done about 1000klm’s since then (it's just under 30,000) and the Ricky Stator has failed. So, that's the third stator failure on this machine in a relatively short time.

 

The bike runs when the battery is charged, but there is no power coming through to the battery. Fully charged, it sits on 12.8 volts with the engine off, idling and revving.

 

I unplugged the plug with the 3 yellow wires coming from the Stator to the regulator and checked each yellow to ground for continuity. There is continuity on all of them.

 

I started the engine and checked the AC voltage output between the 3 yellow wires, it’s between 0 and 5 volts.

 

I did a diode check on the regulator and it seems to be fine.

 

The bike is completely stock, including the exhaust. There are no aftermarket electrical accessories fitted to it. I have done the "free power mod" to it after reading this forum.

 

Can anyone in the know suggest any reason why this bike might be killing stators as I don’t want to buy another stator and have it only last a short time also. I have changed the oil twice in that time and the bike is mainly used for commuting by a middle aged rider and is never ridden hard.

 

Thank you for any assistance you may be able to provide.

 

This is the Ricky Stator that I removed today;

 

16083-Copy_zps9f303f48.jpg

 

16082-Copy_zps3cf3359c.jpg

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Well that's a deep fried stator!! I would check the outside surface to see if the flywheel has touched it.you should also check the current draw from the battery. I would also use oem parts for this job

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Stators over heat and fail.  There seems to be no better answer than that.  Tomorrow I will install my 3rd stator in my 2000 DRZ400.  I conclude it is a design failure on the part of Suzuki.  There is really nothing an owner can do external to the stator to damage it by over load or anything else.  It is a permanent magnet rotor alternator that is basically single output.  It shunts unused output back into itself.  It either needs better cooling or designed for less output.

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Stators over heat and fail.  There seems to be no better answer than that.  Tomorrow I will install my 3rd stator in my 2000 DRZ400.  I conclude it is a design failure on the part of Suzuki.  There is really nothing an owner can do external to the stator to damage it by over load or anything else.  It is a permanent magnet rotor alternator that is basically single output.  It shunts unused output back into itself.  It either needs better cooling or designed for less output.

 

It's interesting how there seems to be no trend for why stator failure seems to happen on some DRZ's and not others...

I must be one of the lucky owners that hasn't had any stator issues in 40,000 kms.. I run low wattage led lights so more unused power would be feeding back to the stator..

Have always done oil changes frequently at around the 1,500 km mark....possibly a determining stator longevity factor..?

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Man, that's a bad one. Usually I burn the lower 1/4-1/3 of the stator, but not the whole thing. 

 

 

I'm going to guess here as to why:

way too long between oil changes

lugging the motor instead of revving it (oil gets hotter, doesn't circulate and cool)

it's a rickystator, stator... OEM lasts the longest i've seen, second place is a rewind

 

does he commute/idle a bunch on that bike ?

fan working properly ? 

is the headlight on while riding ?

Edited by ohgood

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Thanks guys. It's got me baffled. The stator has obviously overheated, but I can't think of any reason why it should have.

 

The oil has always been fresh on this Ricky Stator as I've changed it myself. I suspect that old oil could have been an issue with the original stator and maybe the second one, but since I started maintaining this bike, it's had regular oil changes. You can see how clean the oil is on the stator in one of the pics above.

 

The bike is used primarily for commuting, but the traffic here in Adelaide is not bad - especially at the times this bike is ridden to work (I work with it's owner and we're shift workers), so it doesn't get over heated.

 

The fan works, but I doubt that it would need to kick in on the short commute for this bike. The head light is always on as all street legal bikes in Australia are wired such that the head light is on all the time.

 

There is nothing on the stator to suggest that it has come into contact with the flywheel or anything else that it shouldn't have.

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Oil related failure is greatly exaggerated in terms of stator failure, its 1 out of 100 if at all. You would have to run really cheap oil and never change it, and develope huge amounts of plaque, so much the stator had no way to cool.

 

Or running some type of oil that actually attacks the epoxy coating of the wiring. From what Ive seen, all bikes have stator failure , what you look for is the average life of such model in an OEM configuration. An Oem stator with street use is 20 to 25,000 miles average on a DRZ, offroad use much lower, including aftermarket stators expect lower.

 

In general motorcycles are classified two ways in regard to stator life, above and below 50,000 miles.  Motorcycle models that typically average above 50,000 miles are considered above average life. Majority of Motorcycle models including the DRZ fall into the sub 50,000 mile category.

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Thanks guys. It's got me baffled. The stator has obviously overheated, but I can't think of any reason why it should have.

 

The oil has always been fresh on this Ricky Stator as I've changed it myself. I suspect that old oil could have been an issue with the original stator and maybe the second one, but since I started maintaining this bike, it's had regular oil changes. You can see how clean the oil is on the stator in one of the pics above.

 

The bike is used primarily for commuting, but the traffic here in Adelaide is not bad - especially at the times this bike is ridden to work (I work with it's owner and we're shift workers), so it doesn't get over heated.

 

The fan works, but I doubt that it would need to kick in on the short commute for this bike. The head light is always on as all street legal bikes in Australia are wired such that the head light is on all the time.

 

There is nothing on the stator to suggest that it has come into contact with the flywheel or anything else that it shouldn't have.

 

 

since i've left mine on, i haven't had stator issues. previously i left it off, thinking i was helping the charging system. apparently (theory) not dumping all that wattage to the headlight meant it had to go somewhere, and the stator was warmed up more because of it. i'm also riding it offroad a lot less now ( crying ) because no one rides dualsport in my area now, so that's contributing to the bike's longevity in general. 

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