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Service guide for dummies

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I am looking for your recommendations for a service manual for a newbie, with minimal existing mechanical skills, and a strong desire to learn and teach my son in the process. I have the manufacturer guides for my 2006 CRF250R and my son's 2004 TT-R125 and I don't really like either one. I have a difficult time recognizing the pieces the instructions are mentions in those lousy diagrams. I looked at a Clymer that a buddy recommended and it looked better, but they don't make one for either bike. Should I buy the Haynes for them? Thoughts on Cyclepedia?

Thx

Bryan

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Factory is best, but a Clymer or similar is also useful, shortcuts and special tool substitute recommendations. I like both.

 

Mike

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OEM is best. Being a mechanic is not something a person just does like building a birdhouse. Even then, with a birhouse, you need to know key details to be successful. OEM manuals are nearly always the best. Aftermarket are usually generic and do not always match what you are actually working on.

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Youtube videos can be very helpful.  Although some are made by stupid drunks, so be careful.  These forums are also invaluable.

 

A couple key things to remember - use the correct tools - quality wrenches and screwdrivers - not vice grips and crescent wrenches.  Patience!  Be careful screwing steel bolts into aluminum cases!!!!

 

Where in Florida are you?  I have a 2004 TTR125, and have had it completely apart and have some spare parts.  I also have a service guide for the TTR, which I think is pretty good.  You can borrow it.

Edited by Still Bill
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I know what you mean about how the diagrams can get a little confusing. I was able to replace the cylinder & piston as well as shim the valves and set the timing on my wr250f with the help of the manual, youtube, and forum write ups. It's amazing that some people are willing to take step by step pictures as well as a write up to go with each picture. I don't think I would've been able to complete the job without youtube and forums. Sometimes the people doing the video/write up even tell you what kind of things to look out for which the manual doesn't tell you. 

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Youtube videos can be very helpful.  Although some are made by stupid drunks, so be careful.  These forums are also invaluable.

 

A couple key things to remember - use the correct tools - quality wrenches and screwdrivers - not vice grips and crescent wrenches.  Patience!  Be careful screwing steel bolts into aluminum cases!!!!

 

Where in Florida are you?  I have a 2004 TTR125, and have had it completely apart and have some spare parts.  I also have a service guide for the TTR, which I think is pretty good.  You can borrow it.

Thanks, Bill. I'm in Tampa. I have the Yamaha Service Guide on the iPad. But I'm such a newbie, I still have to look at pictures to tell the carb from the starter! I'll get there.

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Thanks, Bill. I'm in Tampa. I have the Yamaha Service Guide on the iPad. But I'm such a newbie, I still have to look at pictures to tell the carb from the starter! I'll get there.

 

I am just over the CCC bridge here and Clearwater and am pretty handy when working on bikes. Let me know if you need me to look at anything.

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Thanks for the offer UncleLuke. Since I have no idea what I'm doing, I may take you up on that. First priority after I get back in town is to rebuild the carb because the floats are sticking and it's dumping fuel like crazy. Then I'd like to get the electric starter working since my son isn't strong enough to kick it. Once his bike is running well, I need to figure out how to take care of my CRF250R.

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Japanese manuals are a crack up sometimes in the translation of Japanese to English.  Other than that OEM manuals are the best.

 

It helps during the process to take a few digital pictures of your own to help get things back to where they came from during reassembly.

 

Good luck!

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Youtube videos can be very helpful.  Although some are made by stupid drunks, so be careful.  These forums are also invaluable.

 

A couple key things to remember - use the correct tools - quality wrenches and screwdrivers - not vice grips and crescent wrenches.  Patience! 

 

 

 

+10 .....Cant stress the importance of the correct tools ..buy the proper tool you need for each job you do and you will soon have all the tools you need. Good tools are not cheap, don't waste money on the discount store tools and think you have the proper tools because you'll ruin parts and still need to buy a quality tool.

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I've found that with the factory KTM manual that they explain things like you are suppose to know what to do already. I bought the Haynes manual and found it far better to work with. More detailed instructions and pictures. If the jap manuals are the same I would buy a Haynes book.

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Japanese manuals are a crack up sometimes in the translation of Japanese to English. Other than that OEM manuals are the best.

It helps during the process to take a few digital pictures of your own to help get things back to where they came from during reassembly.

Good luck!

Not as bad as my husky manual tho, they have some wierd terms for things plus 10 diff languages

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Thanks for the offer UncleLuke. Since I have no idea what I'm doing, I may take you up on that. First priority after I get back in town is to rebuild the carb because the floats are sticking and it's dumping fuel like crazy. Then I'd like to get the electric starter working since my son isn't strong enough to kick it. Once his bike is running well, I need to figure out how to take care of my CRF250R.

 

Okay, send me a PM and let me know

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Thanks for all the great advice. I think I'm going to try to rebuild my son's carb with the factory warranty, TT posts and youtube on Friday, and hope I can get it back together enough we can ride this weekend :) 

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I use the OEM Workshop Manual as my first reference. They highlight anything that may be specific to the model. Then I use the Clymer manual as something extra because it gives you hints and tips that are useful for a non-mechanic. The OEM manual assumes you already know how to fix a bike and doesn't give you those little tips because they are assumed knowledge for a mechanic.

Neither manual has great exploded diagrams so I go to a parts site like http://www.cmsnl.com/ or http://www.partzilla.com/parts/search/Yamaha/Motorcycle/parts.html

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