Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Plantar Fasciotomy

Recommended Posts

Question about recovery time. I had my left foot operated on and now since then I have a lot of pain around the left heel. Not necessarily heel pain like plantar fasciotious, but tons of muscle pain around the heel. Basically the sides of the heel hurt especially when running. After running I can't walk. What is going on? How much longer will this keep going on? And I can't quite just go see a doctor because the lady who did the surgery is in Alaska on a military base. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I've been battling PF for a while now - had it on my right foot, then finally it went away, now I've been battling it on my left since May :banghead:

 

I know DrMark mentioned to me last year that  "Plantar fascitis is caused by a gastronemeus contracture in most cases. If stretching doesn't work, release of the gastroc tendon proximal to is insertion into the Achillles tendon is curative."  That way, weight bearing isn't affected.

 

It'll be interesting to read his comment (if he does comment)...But then again, he might say that you need to address these concerns to the one who held the knife.

 

Good luck in your recovery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those injuries take a long time to heal.

 

Last year I transitioned from a heel strike to a mid foot strike. Everything went great, slow easy transition, couple races over the summer then winter hit and I pretty much stopped running (BIG MISTAKE).

 

Early spring rolled around and I started getting some planter factitious in my left foot. I'm talking hobbling out of bed, holding to the railing on the stairs after a mere 5 miler. Started dunking both feet in an ice bucket right after my runs, really helped with next day pain. Slowwwly began ramping my distance back up and my last 1/2 marathon went well. I am still tender after anything over 5 right now but no longer need to ice. This has been going on since February...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds like it could be Achilles tendonitis as well....I ruptured mine after months of the pain as you describe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sounds like it could be Achilles tendonitis as well....I ruptured mine after months of the pain as you describe.

What did you do to fix the problem?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What did you do to fix the problem?

 

Stretch, ice and anti inflammatory such as advil or prescription.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only comment on my experience. Ice after exercise, deep massage before bed on the foot (expect mild discomfort the first few times), best is after a shower when everything is soft. I was doing small exercises like picking up a golf ball with my foot when sitting at a desk as well. Another friend of mine had good success with the planter sock worn during sleep although I never tried it. I also increased the amount of protein I was taking in for whatever that's worth. I never think its a good idea to run a deficit when you're injured, your body needs calories to repair itself.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Strassburg-Sock-Regular-Size-Around/dp/B001AW3O00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SOB!!!!! I just threw away both my PF socks that were given to me by the USAF. That sock is expensive. I thought I would be all better by now. I stretch then all around the heel burns, then it finally calms down. When I get up after sitting around for a while, damnnnn does it hurt to walk. Really stiff and tight. I ice it and it still hurts.

I think I am going to hit up the acid-a-cal, I have a heel spur on both heels. Wonder if the spur on the left heel is causing some pain? The right one has it too but don't hurt. Thanks for the help so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Dr Marks take on this as relayed by Skater. I have had PF both feet for 5 years which means I'm completely unqualified to tell you how to fix this problem. But, there are things that I wish I had done differently that may have improved things. I was agressively stretching the first year. I'm now sure that was counterproductive. I feel it was like a constant re-injury to the fascia. Mild responsible stretching should have been my goal. I felt like I was saying "hey watch me stretch my way out of this plantar problem everyone complains about". Nope.  I probably didn't use anti inflamatories often enough.  I also wish I had used a mild version of a night splint, not the strassburg sock that pulls the toes back, that is taking it too far, and severely painful in my case.  I now keep a night splint on the shelf that I use during flare ups. This one keeps the toes in line with the foot and keeps the foot mildy dorsiflexed, hoping to force that tendon to heal up overnight in a lengthened position, making it less likely over time to be reinjured.  The orthotics, were important as well, keeping pressure distributed and less focused in the plantar fascia heel area. A nice orthotic will have a good deep heel cup shape and will be firm and supportive but not a rock. You dont want to trade plantar faciitis for some other metatarsal problem or mortons neuroma or whatever because of a poor fitting insole. Its worth an trip to a specialist to get the right footwear set up. Saves $ in the long run vs constant re injury..Best of luck hope you get through it fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...