Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Jumping 101

Recommended Posts

I have been riding for about 15 years. Part of that time consist of me owning clapped out bikes or using my friends semi-reasonably set up bikes ranging from KDX's to CR's to EXC's to WR's.

 

I do have skill on the bike however all of the riding I have done is off road and usually pretty technical tight twisty stuff. So im good in that department (atleast for now). I know I need more seat time to really master riding but I also do know that I am doing something wrong when it comes to jumping. Whether its my approach speed, the way I give it gas, if im too far forward or too far back.

 

I write this because after looping my bike over a finish line jump trying to pace a kid I sit here with a severely bruised heel bone lol after ditching my bike mid air and coming down on my heel.

 

Does ANYONE have any tips, methods, technique advice ETCETERA!??! Much appreciated!!

 

Andrew

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

like anything, break it down to basics and work on specific things. Body position/movement, throttle, suspension reaction on the face. Focus on what you're doing on the face, if you do that part right everything else happens automatically. Get back on the throttle before landing as it smooths things out.

 

Nothing can replace hitting jumps over and over and over. Then when you can hit a jump it with your eyes closed, switch it up to change things. Make the run up shorter so you have to accelerate harder or preload. Or make it longer so you have to hit it with less gas or off the gas.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to be mid air noes high on every jump for years. Tried every technique and lots suspension settings, nothing worked. Just recently found out my linkage bearings are seized up. Fixed it and moved up a class overnight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have a pretty well set up 03 cr 250 i have some CRF forks on it too and Works rear shock hehe yea thtas right! haha...anyways i think im just being a squid.... lol i think im not letting off the gas soon enough and have no idea what the &%$#@! im doing o well!! off too mendocino forest to practice jumping on some water bars!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take it to a well prepped track where the jumps aren't too big and have decent faces as it is the safest and best way to practice. Riding some bodged jump in the woods is less confidence inspiring and is more dangerous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some high points, in my opinion....

 

#1:  Hit the same jump over and over.  Every jump is different...and when you dont have skills...and do the same thing on different jumps...you will get different results.  This will slow your learning.  So try and get a lot of reps in on the same jump.  By lots...I mean hundreds in a day.

 

#2:  Learn to jump standing.  Dont ask why at this point...just do it.

 

#3:  90% of what you need to learn about jumping can be learned on a small jump TO FLAT.  I think 40" tall (vertical height)...with a moderate face (20 degrees = approx 10' long face, 25 degrees = approx 8' long face) is good.  This is about the smallest jump to safely learn on.  Very small jumps are unsafe because the front leaves the face so soon, and you are loading the rear while the front is clear.  Water bars are generally NOT good.  Too small.  Large and very very long jump faces are also not good for learning, because your suspension will load and unload (at least at the speed a novice is going) before you leave the face.  This means you will not learn the skill of adjusting to the bikes motions at the top 1/2 to 1/3 of the face.  Also,  jumping to flat will teach you how to land in the right position on the gas. The benefit is when you case something...or OJ something in the future...you will not panic.  You will know what to do.  Pros can jump 70,80,90 feet to dead flat and ride away easy.  Someone who does not know what to do can take a yard sale over the bars jumping 40' to flat.

 

#4:  Learn to balance your body against the forces of acceleration and deceleration, and be in balance prior to and as you load into the jump face.  Advice about how you should be in a certain 'position' is wrong.  You should be in balance.   If you are accelerating...you will be in a forward position.  If you are accelerating hard...you will be really forward..head out past the plate.  If you are coasting (2 stroke trailing throttle for instance)...you will be mid position.  If you are engine braking or actually braking...your hips will be back.  The idea is that your body should be positioned such that it is balanced in a stable way on the pegs.  The pegs are pushing on you...or you are pushing on the pegs.  You arms are NOT to be pushing or pulling on the bars.  That means the position will be what it needs to be.  If you hit a jump face like this...with your arms loose and relaxed...you are 90% of the way to a safe take off.  Not sure if you are technically inclined, but you want your center of mass to be located such that the net acceleration (acceleration of the bike...combined wiht gravity) is parallel to a line drawing between your center of mass and the bikes!  If this is not true, then any acceleration will create a rotational moment (endo or boner air).

 

#5:  That all said..the best way to learn to jump is standing with a moderate throttle all the way into and off the jump.  Leave jumping coasting..or even braking...till much later.  I built a single like I described at my practice track..and was helping a buddy learn to jump.  I had him do the approach to the jump 20 times...but go to the side of the jump.  I wanted him to be balancing in the standing position such that his arms and hands were totally relaxed.  The lean and position of his body was such that the he was perfectly balanced against the pegs.  Then..when he had this feel down..I had him do the same thing and hit the jump face...

 

#6:  Learn to feel the bike loading up (suspension compressing...and storing energy)...and as you get further up the jump face and your front tire clears the lip...feel how the bike is unloading (springs releasing energy).  If the bike is endoing...you will feel it BEFORE your rear leaves the jump face...and you can react by adding gas and shifting your body back.  Feeling a bike going nose high is harder.   A very very MILD endo feeling is what you want.  That way your bike will angle in a way that tracks your trajectory.  If you feel none of that rear rise at all...you are going to boner air.  That is why it is a very subtle feel to catch a loop out / nose high before you leave the jump face.  The good thing is if you do the body balance thing...you will rarely jump nose high.  Endos are easy to feel.  You will be panic reving sometimes before you leave the face.

 

#7:  If you are getting that good mild angle down (slight endo) that tracks your trajectory...you will be coming in flat to slightly nose down.  You wil generally want to land slightly rear wheel first unless you are really good...and downsiding a steep landing.  So...if you are coming down and the rear is not going to hit first...you will shift your hips forward, pull up on the bars, and "reach" for the ground with the rear tire..and add throttle as you are doing this.  It should all be one motion.  If you watch good riders coming in for a hard landing and they are nose high...you can often see them tap the rear brake to get the nose down...THEN reach for the ground with the rear and bring the nose up.  Why?  Because it puts them in a much better position on the bike.  If you are back and nose high (boner air), you can do nothing because of your position on the bike.  Land hard in this position and you could crash.  But if you are forward and a bit nose down..you can reach for the ground...and land HARD on the gas...which will soften the blow a ton.

 

#8:  Never stop adjusting.  A jump does not end with the take off.  You are continually getting feed back and adjusting...

 

#9:  Assuming your bike is set up well...do not fuss with your suspension to compensate for jumping issues (adding shock rebound damping to stop an endo, or other nonsense).  If your bike is balanced front to rear in flat corners, all adjustments necessary to leave the jump face safely can be made with body position and throttle.

Edited by Blutarsky
  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some high points, in my opinion....

#1: Hit the same jump over and over. Every jump is different...and when you dont have skills...and do the same thing on different jumps...you will get different results. This will slow your learning. So try and get a lot of reps in on the same jump. By lots...I mean hundreds in a day.

#2: Learn to jump standing. Dont ask why at this point...just do it.

#3: 90% of what you need to learn about jumping can be learned on a small jump TO FLAT. I think 40" tall (vertical height)...with a moderate face (20 degrees = approx 10' long face, 25 degrees = approx 8' long face) is good. This is about the smallest jump to safely learn on. Very small jumps are unsafe because the front leaves the face so soon, and you are loading the rear while the front is clear. Water bars are generally NOT good. Too small. Large and very very long jump faces are also not good for learning, because your suspension will load and unload (at least at the speed a novice is going) before you leave the face. This means you will not learn the skill of adjusting to the bikes motions at the top 1/2 to 1/3 of the face. Also, jumping to flat will teach you how to land in the right position on the gas. The benefit is when you case something...or OJ something in the future...you will not panic. You will know what to do. Pros can jump 70,80,90 feet to dead flat and ride away easy. Someone who does not know what to do can take a yard sale over the bars jumping 40' to flat.

#4: Learn to balance your body against the forces of acceleration and deceleration, and be in balance prior to and as you load into the jump face. Advice about how you should be in a certain 'position' is wrong. You should be in balance. If you are accelerating...you will be in a forward position. If you are accelerating hard...you will be really forward..head out past the plate. If you are coasting (2 stroke trailing throttle for instance)...you will be mid position. If you are engine braking or actually braking...your hips will be back. The idea is that your body should be positioned such that it is balanced in a stable way on the pegs. The pegs are pushing on you...or you are pushing on the pegs. You arms are NOT to be pushing or pulling on the bars. That means the position will be what it needs to be. If you hit a jump face like this...with your arms loose and relaxed...you are 90% of the way to a safe take off. Not sure if you are technically inclined, but you want your center of mass to be located such that the net acceleration (acceleration of the bike...combined wiht gravity) is parallel to a line drawing between your center of mass and the bikes! If this is not true, then any acceleration will create a rotational moment (endo or boner air).

#5: That all said..the best way to learn to jump is standing with a moderate throttle all the way into and off the jump. Leave jumping coasting..or even braking...till much later. I built a single like I described at my practice track..and was helping a buddy learn to jump. I had him do the approach to the jump 20 times...but go to the side of the jump. I wanted him to be balancing in the standing position such that his arms and hands were totally relaxed. The lean and position of his body was such that the he was perfectly balanced against the pegs. Then..when he had this feel down..I had him do the same thing and hit the jump face...

#6: Learn to feel the bike loading up (suspension compressing...and storing energy)...and as you get further up the jump face and your front tire clears the lip...feel how the bike is unloading (springs releasing energy). If the bike is endoing...you will feel it BEFORE your rear leaves the jump face...and you can react by adding gas and shifting your body back. Feeling a bike going nose high is harder. A very very MILD endo feeling is what you want. That way your bike will angle in a way that tracks your trajectory. If you feel none of that rear rise at all...you are going to boner air. That is why it is a very subtle feel to catch a loop out / nose high before you leave the jump face. The good thing is if you do the body balance thing...you will rarely jump nose high. Endos are easy to feel. You will be panic reving sometimes before you leave the face.

#7: If you are getting that good mild angle down (slight endo) that tracks your trajectory...you will be coming in flat to slightly nose down. You wil generally want to land slightly rear wheel first unless you are really good...and downsiding a steep landing. So...if you are coming down and the rear is not going to hit first...you will shift your hips forward, pull up on the bars, and "reach" for the ground with the rear tire..and add throttle as you are doing this. It should all be one motion. If you watch good riders coming in for a hard landing and they are nose high...you can often see them tap the rear brake to get the nose down...THEN reach for the ground with the rear and bring the nose up. Why? Because it puts them in a much better position on the bike. If you are back and nose high (boner air), you can do nothing because of your position on the bike. Land hard in this position and you could crash. But if you are forward and a bit nose down..you can reach for the ground...and land HARD on the gas...which will soften the blow a ton.

#8: Never stop adjusting. A jump does not end with the take off. You are continually getting feed back and adjusting...

#9: Assuming your bike is set up well...do not fuss with your suspension to compensate for jumping issues (adding shock rebound damping to stop an endo, or other nonsense). If your bike is balanced front to rear in flat corners, all adjustments necessary to leave the jump face safely can be made with body position and throttle.

Bkutarsky, again a great and informative read. Thanks!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some high points, in my opinion....

 

#1:  Hit the same jump over and over.  Every jump is different...and when you dont have skills...and do the same thing on different jumps...you will get different results.  This will slow your learning.  So try and get a lot of reps in on the same jump.  By lots...I mean hundreds in a day.

 

#2:  Learn to jump standing.  Dont ask why at this point...just do it.

 

#3:  90% of what you need to learn about jumping can be learned on a small jump TO FLAT.  I think 40" tall (vertical height)...with a moderate face (20 degrees = approx 10' long face, 25 degrees = approx 8' long face) is good.  This is about the smallest jump to safely learn on.  Very small jumps are unsafe because the front leaves the face so soon, and you are loading the rear while the front is clear.  Water bars are generally NOT good.  Too small.  Large and very very long jump faces are also not good for learning, because your suspension will load and unload (at least at the speed a novice is going) before you leave the face.  This means you will not learn the skill of adjusting to the bikes motions at the top 1/2 to 1/3 of the face.  Also,  jumping to flat will teach you how to land in the right position on the gas. The benefit is when you case something...or OJ something in the future...you will not panic.  You will know what to do.  Pros can jump 70,80,90 feet to dead flat and ride away easy.  Someone who does not know what to do can take a yard sale over the bars jumping 40' to flat.

 

#4:  Learn to balance your body against the forces of acceleration and deceleration, and be in balance prior to and as you load into the jump face.  Advice about how you should be in a certain 'position' is wrong.  You should be in balance.   If you are accelerating...you will be in a forward position.  If you are accelerating hard...you will be really forward..head out past the plate.  If you are coasting (2 stroke trailing throttle for instance)...you will be mid position.  If you are engine braking or actually braking...your hips will be back.  The idea is that your body should be positioned such that it is balanced in a stable way on the pegs.  The pegs are pushing on you...or you are pushing on the pegs.  You arms are NOT to be pushing or pulling on the bars.  That means the position will be what it needs to be.  If you hit a jump face like this...with your arms loose and relaxed...you are 90% of the way to a safe take off.  Not sure if you are technically inclined, but you want your center of mass to be located such that the net acceleration (acceleration of the bike...combined wiht gravity) is parallel to a line drawing between your center of mass and the bikes!  If this is not true, then any acceleration will create a rotational moment (endo or boner air).

 

#5:  That all said..the best way to learn to jump is standing with a moderate throttle all the way into and off the jump.  Leave jumping coasting..or even braking...till much later.  I built a single like I described at my practice track..and was helping a buddy learn to jump.  I had him do the approach to the jump 20 times...but go to the side of the jump.  I wanted him to be balancing in the standing position such that his arms and hands were totally relaxed.  The lean and position of his body was such that the he was perfectly balanced against the pegs.  Then..when he had this feel down..I had him do the same thing and hit the jump face...

 

#6:  Learn to feel the bike loading up (suspension compressing...and storing energy)...and as you get further up the jump face and your front tire clears the lip...feel how the bike is unloading (springs releasing energy).  If the bike is endoing...you will feel it BEFORE your rear leaves the jump face...and you can react by adding gas and shifting your body back.  Feeling a bike going nose high is harder.   A very very MILD endo feeling is what you want.  That way your bike will angle in a way that tracks your trajectory.  If you feel none of that rear rise at all...you are going to boner air.  That is why it is a very subtle feel to catch a loop out / nose high before you leave the jump face.  The good thing is if you do the body balance thing...you will rarely jump nose high.  Endos are easy to feel.  You will be panic reving sometimes before you leave the face.

 

#7:  If you are getting that good mild angle down (slight endo) that tracks your trajectory...you will be coming in flat to slightly nose down.  You wil generally want to land slightly rear wheel first unless you are really good...and downsiding a steep landing.  So...if you are coming down and the rear is not going to hit first...you will shift your hips forward, pull up on the bars, and "reach" for the ground with the rear tire..and add throttle as you are doing this.  It should all be one motion.  If you watch good riders coming in for a hard landing and they are nose high...you can often see them tap the rear brake to get the nose down...THEN reach for the ground with the rear and bring the nose up.  Why?  Because it puts them in a much better position on the bike.  If you are back and nose high (boner air), you can do nothing because of your position on the bike.  Land hard in this position and you could crash.  But if you are forward and a bit nose down..you can reach for the ground...and land HARD on the gas...which will soften the blow a ton.

 

#8:  Never stop adjusting.  A jump does not end with the take off.  You are continually getting feed back and adjusting...

 

#9:  Assuming your bike is set up well...do not fuss with your suspension to compensate for jumping issues (adding shock rebound damping to stop an endo, or other nonsense).  If your bike is balanced front to rear in flat corners, all adjustments necessary to leave the jump face safely can be made with body position and throttle.

 

Copy and Paste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some high points, in my opinion....

 

#1:  Hit the same jump over and over.  Every jump is different...and when you dont have skills...and do the same thing on different jumps...you will get different results.  This will slow your learning.  So try and get a lot of reps in on the same jump.  By lots...I mean hundreds in a day.

 

#2:  Learn to jump standing.  Dont ask why at this point...just do it.

 

#3:  90% of what you need to learn about jumping can be learned on a small jump TO FLAT.  I think 40" tall (vertical height)...with a moderate face (20 degrees = approx 10' long face, 25 degrees = approx 8' long face) is good.  This is about the smallest jump to safely learn on.  Very small jumps are unsafe because the front leaves the face so soon, and you are loading the rear while the front is clear.  Water bars are generally NOT good.  Too small.  Large and very very long jump faces are also not good for learning, because your suspension will load and unload (at least at the speed a novice is going) before you leave the face.  This means you will not learn the skill of adjusting to the bikes motions at the top 1/2 to 1/3 of the face.  Also,  jumping to flat will teach you how to land in the right position on the gas. The benefit is when you case something...or OJ something in the future...you will not panic.  You will know what to do.  Pros can jump 70,80,90 feet to dead flat and ride away easy.  Someone who does not know what to do can take a yard sale over the bars jumping 40' to flat.

 

#4:  Learn to balance your body against the forces of acceleration and deceleration, and be in balance prior to and as you load into the jump face.  Advice about how you should be in a certain 'position' is wrong.  You should be in balance.   If you are accelerating...you will be in a forward position.  If you are accelerating hard...you will be really forward..head out past the plate.  If you are coasting (2 stroke trailing throttle for instance)...you will be mid position.  If you are engine braking or actually braking...your hips will be back.  The idea is that your body should be positioned such that it is balanced in a stable way on the pegs.  The pegs are pushing on you...or you are pushing on the pegs.  You arms are NOT to be pushing or pulling on the bars.  That means the position will be what it needs to be.  If you hit a jump face like this...with your arms loose and relaxed...you are 90% of the way to a safe take off.  Not sure if you are technically inclined, but you want your center of mass to be located such that the net acceleration (acceleration of the bike...combined wiht gravity) is parallel to a line drawing between your center of mass and the bikes!  If this is not true, then any acceleration will create a rotational moment (endo or boner air).

 

#5:  That all said..the best way to learn to jump is standing with a moderate throttle all the way into and off the jump.  Leave jumping coasting..or even braking...till much later.  I built a single like I described at my practice track..and was helping a buddy learn to jump.  I had him do the approach to the jump 20 times...but go to the side of the jump.  I wanted him to be balancing in the standing position such that his arms and hands were totally relaxed.  The lean and position of his body was such that the he was perfectly balanced against the pegs.  Then..when he had this feel down..I had him do the same thing and hit the jump face...

 

#6:  Learn to feel the bike loading up (suspension compressing...and storing energy)...and as you get further up the jump face and your front tire clears the lip...feel how the bike is unloading (springs releasing energy).  If the bike is endoing...you will feel it BEFORE your rear leaves the jump face...and you can react by adding gas and shifting your body back.  Feeling a bike going nose high is harder.   A very very MILD endo feeling is what you want.  That way your bike will angle in a way that tracks your trajectory.  If you feel none of that rear rise at all...you are going to boner air.  That is why it is a very subtle feel to catch a loop out / nose high before you leave the jump face.  The good thing is if you do the body balance thing...you will rarely jump nose high.  Endos are easy to feel.  You will be panic reving sometimes before you leave the face.

 

#7:  If you are getting that good mild angle down (slight endo) that tracks your trajectory...you will be coming in flat to slightly nose down.  You wil generally want to land slightly rear wheel first unless you are really good...and downsiding a steep landing.  So...if you are coming down and the rear is not going to hit first...you will shift your hips forward, pull up on the bars, and "reach" for the ground with the rear tire..and add throttle as you are doing this.  It should all be one motion.  If you watch good riders coming in for a hard landing and they are nose high...you can often see them tap the rear brake to get the nose down...THEN reach for the ground with the rear and bring the nose up.  Why?  Because it puts them in a much better position on the bike.  If you are back and nose high (boner air), you can do nothing because of your position on the bike.  Land hard in this position and you could crash.  But if you are forward and a bit nose down..you can reach for the ground...and land HARD on the gas...which will soften the blow a ton.

 

#8:  Never stop adjusting.  A jump does not end with the take off.  You are continually getting feed back and adjusting...

 

#9:  Assuming your bike is set up well...do not fuss with your suspension to compensate for jumping issues (adding shock rebound damping to stop an endo, or other nonsense).  If your bike is balanced front to rear in flat corners, all adjustments necessary to leave the jump face safely can be made with body position and throttle.

Possibly the best response I have ever seen to a jumping question! Excellent work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...