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I have to replace the gaskets on my YZ85 since it's leaking. I've done some research and see some people using things like Permatex silicone gasket maker as a sealant. Should I do this just in case? Maybe it's not needed, but it can't hurt right?

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A sealant is not a Gasket , you don't need it when you use the correct gaskets , decent surfaces and the correct torque on the bolts .

In some application's sealant can be used , but just a tiny amount .

 

Okay, so no sealant. Do I put the gaskets on dry? Don't need oil or anything? Sorry for the ignorance. I'm learning. :thumbsup:

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I would put on a very small amount, just incase. I do it just incase the gasket has a small imperfection, and just to be safe.

 

Don't try to use silicone as a gasket.

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You can spray your gaskets with the stuff in the copper colored can and it seems to help make sure it seals well. 

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Gasket sealant is a good cure for a 1971 Slant 6. Paper gaskets (un-broken of course) will keep everything where it's supposed to be and won't "blow out" due to high(er) pressures that a motorcycle motor will create. If you have a leak, replace the gasket, if that doesn't work, find and sand/file the part flat again, then reseal using a good gasket. The really, truly, HORRIBLE thing about gasket sealers is; WHEN (not IF) you use to much, it gets sucked into the moving parts of the motor/transmission that don't have clearances to let this stuff "go by" and it will ruin parts.

 

Again, gasket sealer is OK for an old school, low pressure, motor...NOT for a high performance dirt bike engine!

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You can buy rolls or sheets of gasket paper for about $15.00 or so.

An exacto knife and you're set.

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Make all mating parts 'surgically clean. Remove all traces of the old gaskets. DO NOT gouge the soft alloy surfaces.Wipe with contact cleaner/benzine or other mild solvent. With clean hands, install the gasket and put the cover on. Tighten the bolt evenly and snug, do not crank down on them.

Read your service/owners manual for information about where sealant (and which type) is needed. Less is more.

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A guy I used to know raced and was sponsored by Honda.  They paid for the parts and fluids and such, as usual.  He showed me a trick probably 25 years ago that I still use today.

 

On your case gaskets, or really any paper gasket, first make sure the mating surfaces are clean and smooth.  Then take your new gasket and lay  in on a sheet of cardboard and spray it with Pam.  Flip the gasket and spray the other side.  Install and torque as you normally would. Just a light spray is all that is needed.  If the gasket is dripping, wipe some off with a paper towel.

 

When it comes time to disassemble the part, the gasket falls off, no scraping needed.  In the 8 or 9 years he did this there was never a gasket failure or leak, and the gasket never failed to come off with just your fingers.

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I have to replace the gaskets on my YZ85 since it's leaking. I've done some research and see some people using things like Permatex silicone gasket maker as a sealant. Should I do this just in case? Maybe it's not needed, but it can't hurt right?

One reason not yet mentioned about using paper gaskets is that they are often used in areas where the motor has been designed with the thickness of the gasket added in. If you were to use a liquid gasket in these critical areas instead of a paper gasket then you would mess up these clearances. Some have tried this and ended up on a forum asking why their bike won't start and stuff like that.

Popular rookie mistake with the Aprilia RXV 5.5. If you glue even something as innocent as the side cover on with sealant instead of using a paper gasket it won't turn over, at all. 

If you are going to make a gasket just bear in mind that gasket paper comes in different thicknesses. Either choose the correct thickness or make sure that the part you are putting together doesn't need a specific clearance.

Some people like to use a bit of RTV sealant or copper spray-a-gasket or the like on the surfaces of paper gaskets. This should not be necessary but in reality many of us have second hand bikes that have been rebuilt a few times and surfaces are not always in the best condition. Using liquid gasket can fill minor imperfections but it's something that shouldn't need to be done if things were pulled apart properly in the first place and inspected before reassembly.  If you are going to use it just bear in mind that it squashes down to nearly nothing when assembled so when they say a thin bead, they really mean it. As mentioned before people have put too much on and had blobs of it ending up in critical components inside the engine. Some have actually used so much it's glued up something that then won't move. The other option is to assemble without it and if there is a problem with sealing then pull it apart again and lap the surfaces. This is a whole other topic, but basically means sanding the surface until it's perfectly true, using a sheet of glass and some lapping paste. There is a technique to do it right, so if you want to learn how then look it up or ask the forum for a link. 

Another thing that was mentioned was the correct torque. Using the a torque wrench and the specified torque from the repair manual you torque the critical areas up in a criss-cross pattern so that there is an even amount of tension on the parts being bolted together. This is also critical to ensure things seal properly. Engine cases, cylinder to bottom end, and the head are critical and often the side cover and water pump cover. Best to follow the repair manual. 

 

At least now you won't be the be the guy who prises all his stuff apart with screwdrivers, whacks it together with no torque wrench and then gets on the forum to complain about the quality of aftermarket paper gaskets. Good luck :)

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At least now you won't be the be the guy who prises all his stuff apart with screwdrivers, whacks it together with no torque wrench and then gets on the forum to complain about the quality of aftermarket paper gaskets. Good luck :)

 

Hey you're describing my RGV!

 

Nah just kidding. Those use Silicone RTV as the main crank case gasket!

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Hey you're describing my RGV!

 

Nah just kidding. Those use Silicone RTV as the main crank case gasket!

Yes, when I found that on mine I checked just to make sure it wasn't just someone before me doing it wrong, but nope, really is just RTV. 

I think it's the same on the Aprilia RXV 5.5 but then they get ya with the side cover, the thing no-one suspects will matter. 

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Yes, when I found that on mine I checked just to make sure it wasn't just someone before me doing it wrong, but nope, really is just RTV. 

I think it's the same on the Aprilia RXV 5.5 but then they get ya with the side cover, the thing no-one suspects will matter. 

 

I would never own an Italian made motorcycle or car. Beautiful to look at, and go well when they run. The hard bit is keeping them running.

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I like to use the copper spray or brown Permatex goo - but only on ONE side.  That way, it hold gasket in place during assembly.  Also,  you can disassemble and reassemble without tearing gasket. 

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Seems as if there's a bit of a risk involved in using sealant. I don't want anything screwing up my engine. I'll try the copper coat spray if I still have problems. Is there any particular brand that's good to use?

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Seems as if there's a bit of a risk involved in using sealant. I don't want anything screwing up my engine. I'll try the copper coat spray if I still have problems. Is there any particular brand that's good to use?

Permatex Copper Spray-A-Gasket. Not sure who else makes a version of this.

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