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How to get this out

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I've filed down the top before and was able to get it out with a screwdriver.  Your bolt seems way more stuck though so not sure that would work at all.  You would also have to use a 90 degree screwdriver to get in there.

 

Not sure if this would work but if you can still get a nut on.  What if you put two nuts on it and then using the first nut against the second nut you might be able to back it out.  Just a theory.  Might be able to tighten second nut so much on first nut that when you use first nut it will back out with the pressure of the second nut.

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tried that also

Need to heat the bolt.

Then let cool, while spraying with penetrating oil. then try backing it out after its cool enough to touch.

If you do this too soon it could pull the threads in the swing arm.

However if this does happen let us know. There's a fix for that too.

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Need to heat the bolt.

Then let cool, while spraying with penetrating oil. then try backing it out after its cool enough to touch.

If you do this too soon it could pull the threads in the swing arm.

However if this does happen let us know. There's a fix for that too.

use vice grips to back it out?
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use vice grips to back it out?

Lock vise grips on as the bolt is hot. While spraying penetrating oil you should see the vise grips get the bolt turning as it cools.

The aluminium locks tight with corrosion. The heat and oil will loosen up the corrosion. But don't force it.

Keep heating and cooling.

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That happens because water gets trapped inside the swing arm and then rusts the threads on the end of the bolt. Then, as you try and back it out, the rusted threads seize the bolt in the threaded part of the swing arm. As stated above, weld a nut to the end of it. Then lube the exposed threads really well and then run the nut back in to lube the threads. You will at some point have to back it out using force and hope you don't destroy the threads in the swing arm.

 

On my bike I actually drilled a 1/8" hole on the underside of the swingarm right below where that bolt threads in. When I drilled the holes, I got at least 1 quart, maybe 2, out of each leg of the swing arm. It drained, and drained, and drained.. Now no water can get trapped in there as there is a permanent drain. I also coated those bolts with anti-seize.

 

Good luck with your project.

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I would fill the swingarm with a bit of pb blaster through the chain guide bolt hole and let sit over night, put two nuts on the remaining threads and tighten them together, and heat the swing arm around the bolt for about 2 or 3 minutes with a propane torch work it back and forth to get it out of the swing arm. Aluminium expands mare than steel when heated so the hotter the swing arm is the easier it will be.

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Move it back IN before you try to remove.

 

Heating the bolt may help loosen the corrosion, but you should let it cool, then heat the SWINGARM (not the bolt), and try to remove when hot.  Maybe even put wet rag around bolt when heating swingarm?

 

Oh, and putting the two nuts on there (or 3) before screwing up threads with vice grips is a good idea.

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PB blaster is your friend.  However I have heard that a mixture of auto tranny fluid and acetone works even better..  50:50

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PB blaster is your friend. However I have heard that a mixture of auto tranny fluid and acetone works even better.. 50:50

This and heat will break just about anything loose

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That happens because water gets trapped inside the swing arm and then rusts the threads on the end of the bolt. Then, as you try and back it out, the rusted threads seize the bolt in the threaded part of the swing arm. As stated above, weld a nut to the end of it. Then lube the exposed threads really well and then run the nut back in to lube the threads. You will at some point have to back it out using force and hope you don't destroy the threads in the swing arm.

 

On my bike I actually drilled a 1/8" hole on the underside of the swingarm right below where that bolt threads in. When I drilled the holes, I got at least 1 quart, maybe 2, out of each leg of the swing arm. It drained, and drained, and drained.. Now no water can get trapped in there as there is a permanent drain. I also coated those bolts with anti-seize.

 

Good luck with your project.

 

Hmmm I kind of like this idea, TT'rs lets hear why not?

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