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Plastic skids plates vs rocks?

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Would love to switch over to a full coverage poly skid plate. I ride in CT where there's a lot of rocks. Has any body had good luck with them?

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I've always had aluminum skid plates, but have recently been looking at replacing my al. with a plastic skid. The ones that have caught my eye have been the tm design works skid plates. I've had tremendously great experience with their chain guides and that sort of stuff, so I figure that they have to have good skid plates. Another thing that has me curious is the sound absorption vs. deflection/reverberation with the plastic compared to the aluminum skid plates. If I keep my aluminum skid, I might try putting a couple of coats of plastidip on the upper side that mounts to the frame of the skid plate to see if that helps. The can of plastidip is a ton cheaper than a skid plate.

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For rocky areas I would stick with an ally plate. I ride a lot of rocks too and just couldn't imagine feeling confident with a plastic SP.

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The plastic skid/glide plates are nice. They slide right over anything, other than sharp pointy edges. The drawback...once it's damaged, it's that way permanently. At least the alloy skid plate can be repaired easily.

Edited by bowhunter007

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there's a product called UHMW that is awesome. It's slippery yet strong and can flex when needed. Guys use it under jeeps to help them slide over rocks better with their belly pans. Only thing is I've never seen it curved only flat sheets or milled parts. But a 1/8" sheet that was counter sunk and added to a skid plate may be the cats meow if your getting hung on rocks.

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I run an acerbis plastic skidplate on my crf250r. I ride in mass so pretty much the same riding conditions as ct. No vibrations, nice and light and looks good. I've had it on for a good 2 months or like 25 rides and it's been great. And I put my bike through hell and there are no signs of weakness anywhere. Would definitely recommend one.

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there's a product called UHMW that is awesome. It's slippery yet strong and can flex when needed. Guys use it under jeeps to help them slide over rocks better with their belly pans. Only thing is I've never seen it curved only flat sheets or milled parts. But a 1/8" sheet that was counter sunk and added to a skid plate may be the cats meow if your getting hung on rocks.

I work with all uhmw sheets and have made a skid plate with a for his xr250. We used a scrap piece of 1/2" and drilled it for his bolt holes. After it was drilled we put it in the oven to make it pliable, bolted it on and used a torch to finesse it. UHMW is incredibly resilient, but is pretty easy to form with heat and a jig because it's considered a fractional melt. We machine skid plates for snow groomers too. Machine flat, heat and bend in a press. Works really slick Edited by Elkstalker77
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I've been wondering about the plastic ones too. Seems the price of aluminum plates has went through the roof lately. Last one I got a few yeas ago for the KDX was around $50-$60, now looking for one for the YZ I'm finding everything is $100 and up.

Edited by OLHILLBILLY

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Which would you rather have? A plastic one that is quite literally plastic, as in will return to its natural shape, doesn't reflect as much engine noise, will not deform or have sharp edges... or an aluminum one that reflects a lot of engine noise, will not return to normal shape after an impact, will have sharp edges and will bend into something expensive and stay there. Or a carbon one that will look nice for only a few rides, will shatter and splinter after a few hard hits, will not return to shape after impact and will cost a lot to replace.

 

 

I'll take the plastic one. I have a TMD full coverage on my bike and will never go back.

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Plastic all the way.  They can be formed to fit the contours of the bike better, doesn't permanently deform if hit hard, slides very well, less noise, and are lighter.  

 

I love rocks, the rockier the singletrack, the better it is.  I run a zip ty plate for my husky like this one:

 

http://enduro360.smugmug.com/Bikes/EX-bikes/i-zL6ZgKB/0/L/P1000234-L.jpg 

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I have the Moose HDPE plate on one of my bikes and it's great. Many hits and it's still in good shape.

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I notice a few people mentioned bending ally plates. I haven't seen any US made skid plates, but I can assure you if you bent the ally skid plate I use you have much bigger concerns than repairing the plate. As for weight savings, 35% lighter for the plastic SP would not be a valid point to buy one IMO. 

Flexing of the plastic plates is mentioned a lot as well. If they flex a lot, where does the flexing stop? When the rock/log is hitting frame rails or engine cases? 

Not looking to argue with anyone, just my thoughts and feelings on Plastic SP.

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I've been wondering about the plastic ones too. Seems the price of aluminum plates has went through the roof lately. Last one I got a few yeas ago for the KDX was around $50-$60, now looking for one for the YZ I'm finding everything is $100 and up.

Look one up for a KTM 990 Adventure...

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....now looking for one for the YZ I'm finding everything is $100 and up.

I have an Enduro Eng one on a 13 ZY250 and it works adequately.

 

Only prob was the hole to access the oil drain plug wasn't big enough; first 2 times I changed the oil I got some in the skid plate.

 

Took the Dremel and a file to it and made it about 3/8" longer and now it works fine.

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Or a carbon one that will look nice for only a few rides, will shatter and splinter after a few hard hits, will not return to shape after impact and will cost a lot to replace.

.

I've had my CF skid plate at least 5 years and it has held up through harescrambles, many years of riding in a rock garden known as Chadwick, and even Colorado recently.

It's the perfect skid plate.

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I've always had aluminum skid plates, but have recently been looking at replacing my al. with a plastic skid. The ones that have caught my eye have been the tm design works skid plates. I've had tremendously great experience with their chain guides and that sort of stuff, so I figure that they have to have good skid plates. Another thing that has me curious is the sound absorption vs. deflection/reverberation with the plastic compared to the aluminum skid plates. If I keep my aluminum skid, I might try putting a couple of coats of plastidip on the upper side that mounts to the frame of the skid plate to see if that helps. The can of plastidip is a ton cheaper than a skid plate.

i personally don't find plastidip cushions enough... i had the same problem with an old skid plate... switch to a scorpion... not trying to sell you but they used strips of the canopy tape used to mount a canopy to your pickup... you can get it anywhere and with a well mounted skid plate you wont feel a thing!  The noice and vibration just stop!  Good luck

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