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do I need take apart my engine?

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I have a 95 KTM 300 exc. I'm just getting into riding and so I'm inexperienced. I'm hoping y'all could give me some input.

My bike started up and then died 50ft later.. I then got it started again and it did the same thing... I took it home and checked the air filter (first time checking it this summer, yes I know now how important it is..). I found that a mouse had eaten half the filter (I found seeds, foam peices and grass)... I've only ridden it a hand full of times (3-4 hrs total) and it was always on grass.

So my question is, what do I need to do to make sure my engine doesn't get toasted from this? I'm planning on cleaning the carb and replacing the air filter (with oil :).. Do I need to take apart my engine? Thanks

Edited by ktmdb

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You really need to check the air boot and carb to see if any debris got down that far. I'm willing to bet much of it passed through the engine.

 

I'm also in Iowa, welcome to Thumpertalk!

Edited by 97wr250

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Check the reeds. Likely propped open with foam chunks. There could be debris down by the crank bearings. Are you due or near due for a top end? This would be a great time to freshen it up and look for debris. This is one case where a fourstroke would be advantageous.

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Most of it got stuck either in the carb slide or the reeds. If any tiny bits of debris got thru to the piston, one, youll never retrieve it, and two, itll burn up and youll never find it. The big thing will be to take the reeds out and service them. Depending on how much shit is packed under the petals they could be bent/warped/cracked.

Clean it out and run the hell out of it! Have fun!

This happened to me two years ago after taking a bike out of storage and being anxious to start it. Id also change the oil after each ride for the first couple rides just to be safe.

Edited by dbart250
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The biggest potential issue will be sand in the crank, rod and wrist pin bearings. Sand will kill them quick. My advice is to at least rinse it out. If it were a race motor then disassemble, but if you're just beginning then you'll probably be fine if you just rinse it out. Remove the motor from the frame, remove the reed block and pour some premix into the the hole where the reed block goes. Shake it all around and pour it out. Do that a couple times, then remove the spark plug put in some more premix and slowly turn the motor over a couple times to help get anything out of the bearings, then pour it out. Do that a couple times, put it back together and you should be good to go. Let it air out and it will be easier to start the first time, or just hold the throttle open while you kick (or push). You'll most likely be fine after that. Good luck!

Edited by sirthumpalot
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replace the filter, check your gas tank vent (if using one of those shorty oneway things ditch it). Check fuel flow out the carb drain.

 

Bruce

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 Id also change the oil after each ride for the first couple rides just to be safe.

Which oil might that be?

 

 

 

The biggest potential issue will be sand in the crank, rod and wrist pin bearings. Sand will kill them quick. My advice is to at least rinse it out. If it were a race motor then disassemble, but if you're just beginning then you'll probably be fine if you just rinse it out. Remove the motor from the frame, remove the reed block and pour some premix into the the hole where the reed block goes. Shake it all around and pour it out. Do that a couple times, then remove the spark plug put in some more premix and slowly turn the motor over a couple times to help get anything out of the bearings, then pour it out. Do that a couple times, put it back together and you should be good to go. Let it air out and it will be easier to start the first time, or just hold the throttle open while you kick (or push). You'll most likely be fine after that. Good luck!

You beat me to it. I've done this a number of times with no ill effects.

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Wow lots of good responses! Thankyou, I'm at work right now so I will respond when I get time.

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You really need to check the air boot and carb to see if any debris got down that far. I'm willing to bet much of it passed through the engine.

I'm also in Iowa, welcome to Thumpertalk!

Thanks, I will check the reed and clean the carb.. Go iowa

Check the reeds. Likely propped open with foam chunks. There could be debris down by the crank bearings. Are you due or near due for a top end? This would be a great time to freshen it up and look for debris. This is one case where a fourstroke would be advantageous.

What do you mean "Are you due or near due for a top end?"..

Edited by ktmdb

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The biggest potential issue will be sand in the crank, rod and wrist pin bearings. Sand will kill them quick. My advice is to at least rinse it out. If it were a race motor then disassemble, but if you're just beginning then you'll probably be fine if you just rinse it out. Remove the motor from the frame, remove the reed block and pour some premix into the the hole where the reed block goes. Shake it all around and pour it out. Do that a couple times, then remove the spark plug put in some more premix and slowly turn the motor over a couple times to help get anything out of the bearings, then pour it out. Do that a couple times, put it back together and you should be good to go. Let it air out and it will be easier to start the first time, or just hold the throttle open while you kick (or push). You'll most likely be fine after that. Good luck!

Thanks, what do you mean by premix? Gas and oil?

Also is this instead of taking the top end off? I don't really know what top end means, I only assume its the top of the engine, does it give me more access to more of the engine to clean?

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Premix is the same gas you put in the tank, gas premixed with oil.  The gas goes through your motor this way while you ride, just a lot less of it. ;). Top end refers to cylinder, piston and wrist pin, bottom end basically refers to anything attached to the crank shaft (rod, bearings, etc).  If you remove the top end (cylinder head and cylinder) then you will have easier access to the piston and crank shaft and you might have an easier time rinsing it out, but IMHO it's not really necessary in this case if you're able to rinse it out through the hole that the reed block goes into. 

 

Normally when you take the top end off of a motor, the labor and cost in gaskets is enough that you might as well put in a new piston and rings while you're in there (and inspect the cylinder for wear).  It's not always necessary, but if you've done all the work to get in there then you might as well put it back together with new parts so that you won't have to go back in there anytime in the near future.  This is especially true if you're paying someone to do the work; the labor can easily be the bulk of the price so it typically makes economic sense to use new parts when you put it back together.

 

But it's your first bike, so expect to learn a lot and screw a few things up along the way.  ;)

Edited by sirthumpalot

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Premix is the same gas you put in the tank, gas premixed with oil. The gas goes through your motor this way while you ride, just a lot less of it. ;). Top end refers to cylinder, piston and wrist pin, bottom end basically refers to anything attached to the crank shaft (rod, bearings, etc). If you remove the top end (cylinder head and cylinder) then you will have easier access to the piston and crank shaft and you might have an easier time rinsing it out, but IMHO it's not really necessary in this case if you're able to rinse it out through the hole that the reed block goes into.

Normally when you take the top end off of a motor, the labor and cost in gaskets is enough that you might as well put in a new piston and rings while you're in there (and inspect the cylinder for wear). It's not always necessary, but if you've done all the work to get in there then you might as well put it back together with new parts so that you won't have to go back in there anytime in the near future. This is especially true if you're paying someone to do the work; the labor can easily be the bulk of the price so it typically makes economic sense to use new parts when you put it back together.

But it's your first bike, so expect to learn a lot and screw a few things up along the way. ;)

Awesome! Thanks for explaining...

Im just planning on cleaning the air boot, carb, reeds, and putting a new air filter on. Then putting sea foam into the gas tank and marvel mystery oil in the Tran oil and doing a few oils changes after 5hrs of riding.. I think this should do it... Ive already learned a lot and look forward to learning more.. Thanks everyone for the knowledge.

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Thanks, I will check the reed and clean the carb.. Go iowa

What do you mean "Are you due or near due for a top end?"..

The piston and rings should be replaced periodically to prevent catastrophic engine failure. I install an hour meter on my four strokes so I can keep track of engine hours. When I was riding two strokes I'd typically replace the piston and rings every year.

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Awesome! Thanks for explaining...

Im just planning on cleaning the air boot, carb, reeds, and putting a new air filter on. Then putting sea foam into the gas tank and marvel mystery oil in the Tran oil and doing a few oils changes after 5hrs of riding.. I think this should do it... Ive already learned a lot and look forward to learning more.. Thanks everyone for the knowledge.

 

Fuel and oil additives are a rookie mistake, don't fall for it.  The bike manufacturers recommendations for oil and fuel are good, there's no need to add anything like seafoam or marvel mystery oil.  In particular be careful with oil additives.  Your clutch is in the tranny oil and some additives can make your clutch slip.  Those additives have their place, but that place isn't in your KTM dirt bike.  Just use good fuel, use a stabilizer if you don't ride often (stabil is excellent and will keep your carb gum free) and use the recommended oil in the tranny.  Stick with any name brand oil (Belray, Amsoil, Motorex, Spectro, Silkoline, etc..) and buy the oil that is recommended for dirt bikes (not the outboard motor or weed whacker stuff) and you'll do just fine.  If the stuff in those additives was so great, the oil manufacturers would have already added it in.  Good luck!

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