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2-stroke wish list

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how about a cvt system?

if you mean a CVT transmission il pass i like banging down gears, it's one of my favorite things about dirtbiking and riding in general.

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DI is a good thing.

 

except it's pretty unreliable on cars,  high pressure pump failures,  valve deposits after 50k miles will be required from now until you get sick of the car,  every DI car has this problem you have to pull off the intake manifold and walnut blast the intake valves 

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except it's pretty unreliable on cars,  high pressure pump failures,  valve deposits after 50k miles will be required from now until you get sick of the car,  every DI car has this problem you have to pull off the intake manifold and walnut blast the intake valves 

 

 

 Intake valve deposits are nothing new in engines, and since two-strokes don't have valves it's irrelevant.

 

And the high-pressure pumps have shown to be about as reliable as non-DI pumps, with the exception of BMW, which is having a terrible time with pump failures.

 

The positives outweigh the negatives for DI in my opinion. Your mileage may vary.

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except it's pretty unreliable on cars,  high pressure pump failures,  valve deposits after 50k miles will be required from now until you get sick of the car,  every DI car has this problem you have to pull off the intake manifold and walnut blast the intake valves

Damn. I've had the thing for years now and its just let me down that many times. :lol:

If it breaks for some reason, I'll pay someone to drop in an LS3.

But unfortunately, its proven to be reliable. As for the build up, yes I've heard of this, because there is no fuel to wash the crud off.

Most people use some kind of chemical cleaner. Edit: Subaru Upper engine cleaner is a favourite.

The build up is due to the PCV, so many fit a catch can

http://forums.justcommodores.com.au/ve-holden-commodore-2006-2013/227308-using-carbon-cleaner-sidi.html

 

Intake valve deposits are nothing new in engines, and since two-strokes don't have valves it's irrelevant.

 

And the high-pressure pumps have shown to be about as reliable as non-DI pumps, with the exception of BMW, which is having a terrible time with pump failures.

 

The positives outweigh the negatives for DI in my opinion. Your mileage may vary.

On my car its a mech pump driven off the camshaft, I imagine yours is similar.

http://www.superchevy.com/features/sucs-1048-v6-camaro-engine-bolt-ons/?__federated=1

If I remember from previous discussions, MrBlahh spends lots of time with BMWs.

Edited by BushPig
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 As for the build up, yes I've heard of this, because there is no fuel to wash the crud off.

Most people use some kind of chemical cleaner.

 

 

Toyota has actually begun adding secondary port-injectors to their DI engines that will function periodically (based on sensors) specifically to put fuel on the backsides of the intake valves to clean them when needed.

 

But yes, an occasional intake tract cleaning is all that's necessary, and is something cars have pretty much always needed. It's not new to DI engines.

 

 

And like I said, deposits on valves is irrelevant for two-strokes... :lol:

Edited by Chokey
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Toyota has actually begun adding secondary port-injectors to their DI engines that will function periodically (based on sensors) specifically to put fuel on the backsides of the intake valves to clean them when needed.

 

But yes, an occasional intake tract cleaning is all that's necessary, and is something cars have pretty much always needed. It's not new to DI engines.

 

 

And like I said, deposits on valves is irrelevant for two-strokes... :lol:

 

yeah this is normal on a non DI engine,  you wont get a check engine light from this,  and most probably dont even know its there.   I'm not sure how a chemical could get in there to clean it

 

This is what they look like, on this engine the air has to go through an intercooler down in the bumper before it gets back up to the manifold 

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=574704&d=131

Edited by MrBlahh

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On normal EFI engines, you simply inject the chemicals in through the injector rail. You have a good point though, I don't know how you would introduce the chemicals in a DI engine.

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On normal EFI engines, you simply inject the chemicals in through the injector rail. You have a good point though, I don't know how you would introduce the chemicals in a DI engine.

What about diesels their DI and run yay longer than than the lifespan of a gas engine.

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What about diesels their DI and run yay longer than than the lifespan of a gas engine.

Big diesels run at 1000-1500 rpm their entire lives, and diesel fuel doesn't create the deposit issues that gasoline does.

Automotive diesels don't last much longer than a well cared for gasoline engine does unless the gas driver has a heavy foot all the time, again, because of the rpm range.

Edited by Chokey

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Big diesels run at 1000-1500 rpm their entire lives, and diesel fuel doesn't create the deposit issues that gasoline does.

Automotive diesels don't last much longer than a well cared for gasoline engine does unless the gas driver has a heavy foot all the time, again, because of the rpm range.

I was thinking about bigger diesels and work trucks. Pickups that live hooked to a trailer all it's life the diesel will always last longer. But just riding around you are right theirs not much difference In lifespan. I was just talking about chemicals into the intake valves to clean deposits would it not be the same as a DI car?

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why does heavy foot matter?  I drive my cars hard and I've not had any trouble getting 250k miles out of them

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why does heavy foot matter? I drive my cars hard and I've not had any trouble getting 250k miles out of them

What kind? I need what you've had my Chevy and dodge trucks have always needed babied one the miles got over say 130000

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why does heavy foot matter? I drive my cars hard and I've not had any trouble getting 250k miles out of them

Friction increases by the square of rpm. Twice the rpm means four times the friction, with an equivalent increase in wear. Keep your engine screaming all the time and it WILL wear out sooner. I can't belive you're even arguing that point.

However, you are reinforcing what I said on proper care. Like I said, a properly cared for automotive gas engine can last almost as long as an automotive diesel.

Edited by Chokey

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What kind? I need what you've had my Chevy and dodge trucks have always needed babied one the miles got over say 130000

The 4.7 in my Dakota is pretty much shot with 150k on it. I've cared for it well too, pretty disappointed with Chrysler/Mercedes on that one.

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What kind? I need what you've had my Chevy and dodge trucks have always needed babied one the miles got over say 130000

 

BMW's I'm on my 9th now the current one only has 60k miles I plan on keeping it to 200k  I try to redline it as often as I can.   I think part of bmw's longevity is the large quantity of oil they hold, and over engineered parts

Edited by MrBlahh

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I was thinking about bigger diesels and work trucks. Pickups that live hooked to a trailer all it's life the diesel will always last longer. But just riding around you are right theirs not much difference In lifespan. I was just talking about chemicals into the intake valves to clean deposits would it not be the same as a DI car?

Like I said, carbon deposits on valves is not an issue with diesels.

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Like I said, carbon deposits on valves is not an issue with diesels.

I see what your saying I've never had a problem with a diesel building up. I'm just having a hard time wrapping my head around why a diesel builds up less carbon than a DI gas engine. Their both pulling in clean air and maybe a little oil from pcv. Just wondering why theirs a difference. Maybe the hotter engine temps from the diesel.

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