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No-repack muffler? this exists?

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SO!! Repacking mufflers. WHAT ... a chore. Would prefer to never have to do that again.

 

Are there any aftermarket mufflers that don't need packing?

 

How awful is the S muffler? I have a nice fat CRD full system, header/midpipe is probably equivalent to a good Yoshimura. Would the S muffler choke it up horribly?

 

Has anyone done that DR650 exhaust mod on a DR-Z, that GSXR titanium muffler deal?

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Fibreglass is dodgy if not handled correctly. I live near the beach and know people who make surfboards for a living. The ones that are new to it use masks, gloves etc. The ones that have been doing it for decades believe it will come to be viewed similarly to asbestos in years to come. They use protective gear now, but suspect the damage has already been done.

 

I have used it to repair dings on surfboards and repack mufflers and I'm pretty cautious with it - although I wasn't previously. I haven't had that much contact with it so hopefully it won't come back to bite me.

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- Even metal mesh will eventually get clogged up with soot.

- Steel wool is flammable... Seriously look it up.

- If you don't use stainless steel wool, it will rust causing more of a problem.

- The packing also helps prevent the muffler body from overheating and failing. Steel wool will transfer heat to the muffler more then fiberglass.

 

I've only had to repack my exhaust a couple times, not really that big of deal, I'm not sure whats wrong with doing this every so often?

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Muffler packing is the way to go.  It's not hard to do either, and it's not like you have to do it every couple of rides or something.  Stick to the pink fluff and ride on.

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Muffler packing is the way to go.  It's not hard to do either, and it's not like you have to do it every couple of rides or something.  Stick to the pink fluff and ride on.

 

Totally agree, it's not that hard, and it's pretty cheap to buy. Actually sounds better the first few rides.....more throaty.  :thumbsup:

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Considering the amount of contact you will have with fibreglass if all you ever do is repack a muffler for a motorcycle, I wouldn't worry. Still, I would recommend handling it with gloves and repacking in a well ventilated place to be on the safe side. 

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I wish more companies made packing for their mufflers like GYTR does:

 

gytrrebuild6.jpg

 

No loose fiberglass, or guessing how much to pack in there, nice pre-cut, pre-sized, customer fit packing. Which I know is a bit more exspensive, but IIRC I still only paid about $30 shipped to my door for the kit.

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Rubber gloves for comfort, a dust mask or bandana over the nose and mouth for safety. Asbestos, fiberglass , and mdf dust are no good for you.

Just some fabric over your face will help for the simple once in a while repack. Diff than industrial exposure.

Steel wool, as others said is flammable, I use it for fire starters

Edited by BLKRAWB
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I've seen some repacking that rolled the fiberglass up tightly into a roll. OThers that used it much more loosely and still others that tore off pieces and dropped them into the can (seemed pretty odd). Does it vary by manufacturer or just peoples goofy ways?

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I believe that Staintune makes a no-repack muffler and/or full system for the DRZ400.  Staintune are great products, but they are pricey and they ship from Australia so you would likely get hit with shipping costs.  Well worth looking into though.

 

I had a GSXR muffler on my DR650 when I had it.  It had a great sound and saved a lot of weight, plus it never needed repacked.  Quite frankly, I don't think it would work very well on the DRZ400 though due to it's size.  It looks alright on the DR as it's porkier than the DRZ, but even there it is quite big. 

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thanks all!

 

I saw some references to a non-repack Staintune muffler but judging from their site it looks to be out of production ... I'll try to dig one up when I get the bug! thanks!

 

I've seen some repacking that rolled the fiberglass up tightly into a roll. OThers that used it much more loosely and still others that tore off pieces and dropped them into the can (seemed pretty odd). Does it vary by manufacturer or just peoples goofy ways?

 

In my last repack I used a deft combination of the abovementioned approaches :)

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The 2008 US model of Yamaha YZ450F had a mechanical shorty muffler ... !

 

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some reviewer seemed to like it, others not ... damn, this would be interesting to try.

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Fibreglass is dodgy if not handled correctly. I live near the beach and know people who make surfboards for a living. The ones that are new to it use masks, gloves etc. The ones that have been doing it for decades believe it will come to be viewed similarly to asbestos in years to come. They use protective gear now, but suspect the damage has already been done.

 

I have used it to repair dings on surfboards and repack mufflers and I'm pretty cautious with it - although I wasn't previously. I haven't had that much contact with it so hopefully it won't come back to bite me.

 

Fiberglass itself isn't a big deal, especially the stuff you should be putting in your muffler. Fiberglass DUST on the other hand, bad news.

 

Use the stuff that is like a thick mat, super easy to do. Takes well under 15 min

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