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Rekluse clutch : what are the good and bad points? ..and also for what kind of terrain?

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I ride technical trail and I was trying to explain how for radical super steep downhills I don't like rekluse and think that it works great for a lot of situations but not for some.. one other being charging up a super steep hill and you don't make it..so now what. .. then you don't have the bike dead engine and with the rear wheel locked up..There's that chance of rolling backward etc..  Anyway I know it's a great product but I think the pro's and cons aren't very well defined.. and it also depends on the terrain.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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I know rekluse is used in like endurocross .. I do not see it used as much in extreme enduro.. unless I'm wrong.

..more stock with cooling and tires..

http://www.redbull.com/cs/Satellite/en_INT/Video/extreme-enduro-bike-setup-video-021243184656521

 

http://vurbmoto.com/blogs/bike-breakdown-cody-webbs-factory-endurocross-beta/20460/

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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Here's some related threads but not exactly clear..but very much related.

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1059997-do-all-the-extreme-enduro-rider-use-a-rekluse/

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1066603-how-come-none-of-the-pros-use-rekluse-clutches/page-2

 

I know also that the rekluse covers are used with the stock clutches also just for the larger volume of oil .. Sometimes you have to dig deeper to see what each guy is using.

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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Couldn't you just summarize and say that the rekluse allows the bike to roll in gear and removes a little engine braking depending on engagement setup.  That is your two points isn't it?

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Only negative is no bump starting the bike. But you can do it in an emergency with an easy adjustment. I see no real negatives at all. It's best features come out in technical terrain!

Edited by DR.billZ
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Couldn't you just summarize and say that the rekluse allows the bike to roll in gear and removes a little engine braking depending on engagement setup.  That is your two points isn't it?

That's barely enough to me. I know for example in super steep technical downhills on a ridge for example I want the motor dead engine in first gear going super slow to not give any momentum at all. A rekluse is still too freewheeling in those situations for me and that's just one point that I'm bringing up. Lots of guys have their reasons to use and not to use a rekluse and this thread hasn't even started yet . I think that also may be part of the reason I see lots of top guys are going manual trans in extreme enduro.. just my guess.. but it's far from being easily summarized at what the good and bad points and for what terrain. I mean if it is so good all of the best riders would have this for mx, extreme enduro.. everything. I can see it being great in more flat rocky riverbeds or endurocross for ex . That's a no brainer but I don't like it for a few situations that I've already mentioned. ...but you did summarize your view of it and that's ok. 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider
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Only negative is no bump starting the bike. But you can do it in an emergency with an easy adjustment. I see no real negatives at all. It's best features come out in technical terrain!

I didn't know there was no bump starting.. That sucks to me. I thought some could be adjusted so that it could be..?

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I didn't know there was no bump starting.. That sucks to me. I thought some could be adjusted so that it could be..?

A lot of the extreme guys do use the Rekluse Webb and Taylor used them at the Erzberg they made a big deal about it on the Redbull TV

show and they finished 9th and 10th I know that Mullins and Russell the top two GNCC guys use them as well.They give you an advantage

when going into a tight corner,and if you fall they don't stall. They really help in tight twisty gnarly stuff one less thing to worry about.They

do freehweel on big downhills that is why they install the handlebar rear brake levers to offset that.And you can adjust it so that it is just like

a normal clutch if you need to very quickly on the new ones it is done with a 4mm hex on the slave cylinder.

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I just noticed that you had a 430 husky a friend of mine retro fitted a rekluse to his 430 and loves it.

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Yea here's the free wheeling part that is a concern to me.. even with a left hand rear brake.

 

SAFETY WARNINGS 

Doc ID: 192-290 

Doc Revision: 081211 

Since any Rekluse auto clutch will make your bike appear to be in neutral when in fact it is in 

gear, it can move suddenly and unexpectedly if the operator applies the throttle with the bike in 

gear. Do not apply excessive throttle to the bike until you are certain the transmission is in 

neutral. When putting the bike in gear, make sure the engine has reached idle speed and the 

brake is applied. 

If your throttle sticks open, use the kill switch to stop the engine. 

Downhill riding with higher auto clutch engagement speeds requires adjustments to your riding 

style. For example, coming over the top of a hill in first gear and slowing to the point that the 

Rekluse auto clutch disengages the clutch, your motorcycle will now be “free-wheeling” down the 

hill. With higher auto clutch engagement speeds, engine speed engages the Rekluse auto clutch, 

not wheel speed. It may be possible to reach very high speeds coming down a hill in a very low 

gear. When throttle is applied, the Rekluse auto clutch will engage suddenly. In this situation, 

severe compression braking could cause an accident or engine damage. 

WARNING 

Clutches are subject to fail during normal use. Clutch failure could cause the rear wheel of the 

motorcycle to lock up while the vehicle is in motion. Should this happen, it may cause the 

operator to lose control of the motorcycle causing property damage, personal injury, or loss of life. 

Always take appropriate safety precautions when riding your motorcycle, including, but not limited 

to, proper training to handle emergencies, proper safety gear, and proper motorcycle 

maintenance. 

WARNING 

Improper installation, service or maintenance of this product can cause injury or property 

damage. Read these directions thoroughly before installation. Only a trained and qualified 

mechanic should install this product. For assist

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Yea here's the free wheeling part that is a concern to me.. even with a left hand rear brake.
 
SAFETY WARNINGS 
Doc ID: 192-290 
Doc Revision: 081211 
Since any Rekluse auto clutch will make your bike appear to be in neutral when in fact it is in 
gear, it can move suddenly and unexpectedly if the operator applies the throttle with the bike in 
gear. Do not apply excessive throttle to the bike until you are certain the transmission is in 
neutral. When putting the bike in gear, make sure the engine has reached idle speed and the 
brake is applied. 
If your throttle sticks open, use the kill switch to stop the engine. 
Downhill riding with higher auto clutch engagement speeds requires adjustments to your riding 
style. For example, coming over the top of a hill in first gear and slowing to the point that the 
Rekluse auto clutch disengages the clutch, your motorcycle will now be “free-wheeling” down the 
hill. With higher auto clutch engagement speeds, engine speed engages the Rekluse auto clutch, 
not wheel speed. It may be possible to reach very high speeds coming down a hill in a very low 
gear. When throttle is applied, the Rekluse auto clutch will engage suddenly. In this situation, 
severe compression braking could cause an accident or engine damage. 
WARNING 
Clutches are subject to fail during normal use. Clutch failure could cause the rear wheel of the 
motorcycle to lock up while the vehicle is in motion. Should this happen, it may cause the 
operator to lose control of the motorcycle causing property damage, personal injury, or loss of life. 
Always take appropriate safety precautions when riding your motorcycle, including, but not limited 
to, proper training to handle emergencies, proper safety gear, and proper motorcycle 
maintenance. 
WARNING 
Improper installation, service or maintenance of this product can cause injury or property 
damage. Read these directions thoroughly before installation. Only a trained and qualified 
mechanic should install this product. For assist

 

I'm not sure how big your downhills are but I haven't had a problem so far I've had mine since August on my  2014 TE300

We ride a lot of tight woods not unlike a lot of the stuff that you've posted Mine will get it's really BIG hill test this November

in Colorado but I really don't expect it to be a problem,I tend to lock up the rear going down big hills and slide the backend

then as I approach the bottom I let her rip.

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The good: 

 

1.  Traction control when climbing, riding techincal stuff, etc.

 

2.  You can ignore the clutch lever.  Very nice feature when you gotta walk your bike, fall over and it won't stall, etc.

 

3.  With the Core that I have, I can use the clutch lever and the entire thing behaves and feels (lever pull) just like a regular clutch.  If I really want to launch out of a corner I'll use the lever - just like the way that works as compared to letting the Core automatically engage.

 

4.  Fibers seem to have a long service life.

 

The bad:

 

1.  No bump starting.  What happens in these threads is folks don't state which bike they have.  Yes, if you have a clutch slave cylinder you can adjust it, and get bump starting rather quickly.  On a YZ with a Core, you have to remove the clutch cover and then adjust.  If you have just the EXP ring, you can back off the adjuster at the clutch lever which lowers the pressure plate...as far as I know.

 

2.  You do have engine braking, but you have to "start" it by blipping the throttle just a bit to engage the EXP ring.  It works, I do it all the time. Although I almost have to say it's not as strong as when using a normal clutch.  Guess maybe there's some slipping going on in there.

 

3.  Mine is picky about oil; it doesn't like Rotella which is recommended by Rekluse.  I use Maxima MTL 80W and it works fine.

 

For me the benefits far outweigh the probs.

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hawaiidirtrider, have you tried an autoclutch on a steep downhill?

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Yea here's the free wheeling part that is a concern to me.. even with a left hand rear brake.

 

SAFETY WARNINGS 

Doc ID: 192-290 

Doc Revision: 081211 

Since any Rekluse auto clutch will make your bike appear to be in neutral when in fact it is in 

gear, it can move suddenly and unexpectedly if the operator applies the throttle with the bike in 

gear. Do not apply excessive throttle to the bike until you are certain the transmission is in 

neutral. When putting the bike in gear, make sure the engine has reached idle speed and the 

brake is applied. 

If your throttle sticks open, use the kill switch to stop the engine. 

Downhill riding with higher auto clutch engagement speeds requires adjustments to your riding 

style. For example, coming over the top of a hill in first gear and slowing to the point that the 

Rekluse auto clutch disengages the clutch, your motorcycle will now be “free-wheeling” down the 

hill. With higher auto clutch engagement speeds, engine speed engages the Rekluse auto clutch, 

not wheel speed. It may be possible to reach very high speeds coming down a hill in a very low 

gear. When throttle is applied, the Rekluse auto clutch will engage suddenly. In this situation, 

severe compression braking could cause an accident or engine damage. 

WARNING 

Clutches are subject to fail during normal use. Clutch failure could cause the rear wheel of the 

motorcycle to lock up while the vehicle is in motion. Should this happen, it may cause the 

operator to lose control of the motorcycle causing property damage, personal injury, or loss of life. 

Always take appropriate safety precautions when riding your motorcycle, including, but not limited 

to, proper training to handle emergencies, proper safety gear, and proper motorcycle 

maintenance. 

WARNING 

Improper installation, service or maintenance of this product can cause injury or property 

damage. Read these directions thoroughly before installation. Only a trained and qualified 

mechanic should install this product. For assist

Wouldn't coasting down the hill with the clutch in do the same? We all manage that one by rubbing a few brain cells together and upshifting if necessary.

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hawaiidirtrider, have you tried an autoclutch on a steep downhill?

Once when trading bikes with a ktm 300 rider but it wasn't  a dangerous critical type trail.. just steep and a little technical. That's part of what bases my decision to not have one... The other information is just basic. I've ridden lots of techical trails and know how dangerous certain situations are just with the manual clutch. If going down  a hill in  first gear and dead  engine going very very slow with a manual clutch is sketchy why would I want to go down that same hill freewheeling or at least more free wheeling than manual the way I'm describing it.. and I'm not even talking about walkdown , bulldoging more aggressive type downhills. That's another thing.  Also does anyone here charge any steep hillclimbs and not make it with a rekluse here? .. so you don't make it and how do you stop the bike from not rolling down the hill backward or even to manage to stay on the bike where you can barely stand on the hill? In steep hillclimbs I've relied on the bike being in gear and dead engine to help hold the bike in place while slowly turning the bike around. How do you keep the bike in place and maneuver your way around the bike stuck on a steep hill in that situation? It's not like one can hold on to the left hand rear brake the whole time.. because lots of times you can barely walk up hills sometimes. Now it's hard to compare for everyone because everyone rides different kinds of trails with different soil.  I'm just looking at how a rekluse works and the good and bad. It's great in the not as critical sections. I have no qualms about that.. It's great there but I'm concerned about the not as often but way more dangerous sections that I could get hurt and..or have my bike get damaged bad because I wont have as good control of it especially in sections where there are cliffs that I can go over.. and we have a bunch of those in different sections. I'll try to give some examples but I don't have vids to show that well. I have a couple but of course gopro vids sometimes are lacking in showing the true angles..

Here's a couple of hills for example that we ride.. How do you think a rekluse would work in these situations.. From what I can see so far having one in these situations are kind a recipe for disaster.. but I don't know. What do you guys do? These 2 examples are actually done pretty clean compared to how some bikes get busted up rolling back down the hill.. with manual clutch.. and everyone tries to not get hurt of bust up yur bike..

 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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Now this is an example of a real steep downhill that I'd rather go in gear and dead engine.. and usually just kick start for the not so hairy parts then go dead engine again. To me I don't want to have to have my left hand on the left hand rear brake.. but that's just how it rolls with a rekluse.. and that's ok.. It's just my concern. I'd be scared to go down this with a rekluse. If others want to use a rekluse in these situations it's up to them. This rider is very good and I and the majority of others would be going much slower . There's cliff on both sides at some sections.. just can't see with the grass sometimes..  Actually it's hard to see with the gopro sometimes. I guess I'll have to video some other stuff to show what I mean..but it's hard to see how steep and how slow you have to go.  I'm sure there are some of you out there that have rekluse and go down some steep stuff. What are your thoughts on it?

 

 

For more flat stuff ..riverbeds etc.. like this kind I figure the rekluse is great.

 

Edited by hawaiidirtrider

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