Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Coming faster into the jumps

Recommended Posts

Last week I went back to a local small track where I used to ride about a year ago. Back then I was just clearing the jumps. 

 

So I went back and thinking those where big jumps I gave it a full throttle and over-jumped more than half of the jumps! I now feel confident jumping, can land the bike the way I want it (back wheel first for flat landing, tap the back brake to get the front down...) but still not playing with sideways movement.

 

What is the next technique I should learn to be able to ride faster through the jumps? So far from all the threads and videos I've read/seen there seems to be 2 choices:

 

1) Learn do scrub. I want to try it, but don't feel ready yet. Sometimes when I get a jump out of a turn and the back kicks sideways it scares me and I don't feel in control. 

2) Absorb the jump and drag the back brake or something like that. The difficulty seems to be to get the right timing.

 

Any more advice would be very appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could try accelerating hard up to the jump then getting on the brakes before the face of the jump so you don't over jump it. but make sure you get back on the gas a little as you go up the face so you don't go over the bars

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't exactly say I know how to scrub, but I know how to hit jumps faster by basically absorbing the face so you don't have as much pop. I just kinda bend my knees as I go up the jump face and keep them bent, and try to stay as low as possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will try CR250_182's advice, as I read before it seems hardest part is to get the timing right to absorb.

 

Getting on the brakes before the face is not really an option as the jumps are all either one after the other (rythm) or coming out of a turn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you should get really good at absorbing before you try to learn to scrub.  A scrub is a more complex way to absorb.  When you absorb conventionally, you do the following:

1.  Hold your normal position approaching the jump.

2.  You may consciously get a little taller / more extended BEFORE you start loading into the jump.  This gives you more height on your body CG to work with.

3.  At first you load into the face normally, but as the bike starts to rebound...you suck up the rebound with your legs/arms/body.  You collapse down on the bike, trying to cancel rebound.  In physics terms, the trajectory of flight is determined by the path of your combined bike and rider Center of Mass at the instant you leave earth.  By collapsing into the bike quickly, at the last bit, you are changing the path of your net Center of MAss...which gives you a lower trajectory.

4.  Ideally...you should be on the seat just  a thousanth of a sec AFTER the rear tire leaves the jump.  Timing is key.  Collapse too early...and you could end up spiking the suspension, and doing an OJ/endo. If you start collapsing too early, you do not change your trajectory enough.

 

With a normal absorb technique, you are limited to the amount of mass you can move to absorb rebound, because you are staying straight up and down.  Eventually...the bike gets in your way.  With a scrub, you add lean (bike one way, you the other), which is much more complex and dangerous to do well.  The timing aspect is what you must really get good at before you think about scrubbing.  Get the timing wrong with a conventional absorb...and you OJ.  Get it wrong scrubbing...and all sort of thing can happen, few of them good. 

 

I can not scrub a bit, because I have never really tried...but I think I can reduce jump height and distance better using a conventional absorb which I do well...than some people who can scrub half assed.  A well exectued absorb is pretty effective.  Dont dismiss it.

 

The scrubbing technique I see used more today is where you really only lean the bike enough to get your butt over the side.  You see this in SX where they have very little time to manipulate their body/bike, and on smaller jumps.  Watch Mookie at the RBSR event.  The full footpeg dragging scrub before you are even near the top seems to be more of an outdoor thing due to the arc the riders have to take up the face.

 

To go really fast, you also need to learn to chop the throttle before the jump.  Most of the really fast guys I watch up close all absorb or scrub with the throttle chopped about 5-10' before the jump face, to give the bike time to take a set before you load into the face.

Edited by Blutarsky
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great advice, I like to get 100% confident step per step, so will start to get this really like a automatic reflex. Once I got it I'll start reading about scrubbing and whipping.

 

Thank a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you should get really good at absorbing before you try to learn to scrub. A scrub is a more complex way to absorb. When you absorb conventionally, you do the following:

1. Hold your normal position approaching the jump.

2. You may consciously get a little taller / more extended BEFORE you start loading into the jump. This gives you more height on your body CG to work with.

3. At first you load into the face normally, but as the bike starts to rebound...you suck up the rebound with your legs/arms/body. You collapse down on the bike, trying to cancel rebound. In physics terms, the trajectory of flight is determined by the path of your combined bike and rider Center of Mass at the instant you leave earth. By collapsing into the bike quickly, at the last bit, you are changing the path of your net Center of MAss...which gives you a lower trajectory.

4. Ideally...you should be on the seat just a thousanth of a sec AFTER the rear tire leaves the jump. Timing is key. Collapse too early...and you could end up spiking the suspension, and doing an OJ/endo. If you start collapsing too early, you do not change your trajectory enough.

With a normal absorb technique, you are limited to the amount of mass you can move to absorb rebound, because you are staying straight up and down. Eventually...the bike gets in your way. With a scrub, you add lean (bike one way, you the other), which is much more complex and dangerous to do well. The timing aspect is what you must really get good at before you think about scrubbing. Get the timing wrong with a conventional absorb...and you OJ. Get it wrong scrubbing...and all sort of thing can happen, few of them good.

I can not scrub a bit, because I have never really tried...but I think I can reduce jump height and distance better using a conventional absorb which I do well...than some people who can scrub half assed. A well exectued absorb is pretty effective. Dont dismiss it.

The scrubbing technique I see used more today is where you really only lean the bike enough to get your butt over the side. You see this in SX where they have very little time to manipulate their body/bike, and on smaller jumps. Watch Mookie at the RBSR event. The full footpeg dragging scrub before you are even near the top seems to be more of an outdoor thing due to the arc the riders have to take up the face.

To go really fast, you also need to learn to chop the throttle before the jump. Most of the really fast guys I watch up close all absorb or scrub with the throttle chopped about 5-10' before the jump face, to give the bike time to take a set before you load into the face.

You always explain things quite well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats good advice.  The way it was explained to me is pretty simple and everyone can relate.  When your jumping on a trampoline and on your last jump you decide your all done so you absorb the rebound with your legs so you stop jumping and can walk off. Thats exactly what you do on the face of a jump, soak up the rebound with your legs. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's already a lot of good advice posted here. I'm adding my take on it as well. 

 

First you should learn how to "Absorb" a jump before working on "Scrubbing" a jump. In order to Absorb a jump you stand tall (just before your knees lock) on the pegs while approaching the jump,. Continue standing tall as the bike loads into the compression part of the jump. Then as the suspension begins to rebound flex in your knees and elbows which allows the bike to come up under you, hence absorb. This also happens when Scrubbing but there are 3 more things going on.

 

Only smooth faced jumps can be scrubbed, not jumps that are soft, rutted or real tacky. This is because the front and rear tires have to slide off the jump. In order to do this you have to lean the bike over as you are going up the jump. The sooner you lean it the better but this also ups the difficulty level. Keep your body position tall, just before your knees lock, as you lean the bike going up the jump. Then at the top of the jump drop your body position in order to absorb the take off. Always drop your body to the opposite side of the way the bike is leaning. Example: if you're leaning to the right you would turn the handlebars to the right and drop your body to the left.

 

This is a very advanced move so start off very easy. If you really want to learn how get my Volume 3 DVD #8 DVD or Stream (Absorbing, Scrubbing and Whipping Jumping Techniques). See free preview before you order:  http://www.gsmxs.com...hniques-preview

 

http://www.gsmxs.com...hniques-preview

scrub Canard sized.jpg

Edited by Gary Semics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a difficult time explaining this to some people. I really like the trampoline analogy. Thanks.

In addition to that on some jumps when I absorb at the last second I flick my bars. It doesn't scrub or lean the bike but it does slow you down just a touch helping to not over jump. Think of it like the most lame attempt of a scrub. The same elements are there you just did them all at a infant newbie level.

Edited by motojunkiedan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×