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Wooden jumps?

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I cannot haul in dirt or move existing dirt on my property, long story, so has anyone ever built wooden jumps? I can build them, no issue there, more curious as to what I could put on them so they had some traction, any ideas?

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I cannot haul in dirt or move existing dirt on my property, long story, so has anyone ever built wooden jumps? I can build them, no issue there, more curious as to what I could put on them so they had some traction, any ideas?

 

What you going to make them from?

 

I'd like to see how your jumps end up. Had little tiny ones made out of pallet pine as a kid.

 

We never had issues with traction, unless they were wet. Could you get glue, apply it to the face of the jump and through dirt and rocks on it?

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Not sure yet about what to use, first thought was to use 2x6's and build the crap out of them so they can handle the abuse. Being wet is my concern, be pretty slick.

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Ive seen alot of fmx jumps that they use icegaurd on. Its the stuff that goes under shingles on the edge of a roof. More ir less like skateboard grip

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I cannot haul in dirt or move existing dirt on my property, long story, so has anyone ever built wooden jumps? I can build them, no issue there, more curious as to what I could put on them so they had some traction, any ideas?

 

Why can't you build dirt ramps?

 

If you can't build dirt ramps because of local zoning or building codes, those codes will also apply to wooden ramps, as they will also be considered a structure.

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Why can't you build dirt ramps?

If you can't build dirt ramps because of local zoning or building codes, those codes will also apply to wooden ramps, as they will also be considered a structure.

Cmon man i thought i had found a way around my problem....flood plain is the issue im having.

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Cmon man i thought i had found a way around my problem....flood plain is the issue im having.

 

 

I'm not sure how flood plain codes and regulations would impact building wooden structures. But as it's government, I'm sure they would find a way to shoot down your solution. The structures would interfere with natural water flow or some such nonsense...

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I think i should build a 20' wall around my property so they can't see what im doing and i can use my land the way i want to. I live on a busy road otherwise I'd just say screw it and use dirt anyway.

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Why can't you build dirt ramps?

 

If you can't build dirt ramps because of local zoning or building codes, those codes will also apply to wooden ramps, as they will also be considered a structure.

I don't believe the wooden ramps would be considered a "permanent structure". Good idea with the chicken wire, maybe use a 2.5 expanded metal.

Edited by 2012 450 xc-w

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I don't believe the wooden ramps would be considered a "permanent structure". Good idea with the chicken wire, maybe use a 2.5 expanded metal.

 

 

What you believe and what Code Enforcement believes will be, I assure you, very different.

 

I don't consider piles of dirt (jumps) to be "structures". Code Enforcement certainly does though.

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What you believe and what Code Enforcement believes will be, I assure you, very different.

 

I don't consider piles of dirt (jumps) to be "structures". Code Enforcement certainly does though.

General Contractor for the last 20 years. Locally (I have first hand experience with this) anything that does not have a concrete foundation is not considered a "permanent structure".

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General Contractor for the last 20 years. Locally (I have first hand experience with this) anything that does not have a concrete foundation is not considered a "permanent structure".

 

 

Yes you are right, things like that will be a local issue. Here, building jumps and ramps on your property are considered to be building "structures". :thumbsup:

 

Your code seems odd though. If you put  storage shed in your back yard and set it on the ground, it wouldn't be a structure? Or does your local government force you to put a little 4 x 8 shed on a slab? 

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The differentiation here is not between what is a structure and what is not, it's between the permanent and temporary types of structures. We are not forced to put slabs under sheds as they are temporary, even if you did it would still be considered temporary. Not much construction around here is slab on grade, which is probably ok in Florida and considered a foundation. Here all foundations are dug into the ground w/ footers or caissons below the frost line- ergo "permanent".

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The differentiation here is not between what is a structure and what is not, it's between the permanent and temporary types of structures. We are not forced to put slabs under sheds as they are temporary, even if you did it would still be considered temporary. Not much construction around here is slab on grade, which is probably ok in Florida and considered a foundation. Here all foundations are dug into the ground w/ footers or caissons below the frost line- ergo "permanent".

 

 

Yeah, no frost line here... :smirk:

 

The big thing here (since Hurricane Charley) is anchorage for hurricane codes. Everything must be anchored with approved hurricane anchors. A/C units, sheds, pool cages...anything that could become a flying missile. Shingles have to be hurricane-approved and be secured properly, trusses have to be tied to the walls with steel straps, exterior doors that open in instead of out have to have exterior shields, etc...

 

The house I lived in during Charley came through it remarkably unscathed (except for most of the shingles and some resulting water damage, and destroyed hurricane shutters in the back) because I had hurricane shutters for all exterior openings, hurricane garage door, no gables or hips on the roof, etc.

 

I watched concrete roof tiles fly through the air as 160 mph missiles. There was a 16 foot aluminum strut from somebody's pool cage driven four feet into the ground in my back yard. After the eye passed over us and the wind reversed direction on the other side, one of the palm trees in our yard ripped loose and slammed into the power roll-down shutters that protected our screened lanai, destroying them, but they prevented the tree from entering the house, so they did their job. There was a port-a-john in front of the house being built next door to us. Before the storm, I turned it on its back and filled it full of cinder blocks to keep it from becoming a missile. After the storm, it was nowhere to be found.

Edited by Chokey

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Put semi functional wheels on the ramps. Then you built trailers even if they aren't moved in and out when you ride.

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