Jump to content

Necessary to line up banjo bolt hole with brake line hole?


Recommended Posts

In process of replacing my rear brake line, and had a quick question about the master cylinder and caliper connections.  The banjo bolts have holes on the side, and on the bottom.  I'm going to assume this is to direct brake fluid.  As such, do I have to line up the holes on the banjo bolts and brake line?  Or will brake fluid naturally surround this hole to direct through the banjo bolt hole?  I'm hoping so because it'd be pretty damn difficult to line up both holes (that's what she said).  See pictures

 

Also, any tips on bleeding brakes from dry?

20141026_120415.jpg

20141026_120435.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, the holes in the bolt do not have to line up to the hole in the banjo fitting. Good of you to consider it though. Notice the inside of the banjo fitting is machined out with a groove, allowing the fluid to flow.

 

When assembling brake parts, always do so wetting the parts with brake fluid. Dry parts 'grab onto' air bubbles, making it harder to get them out.

Assemble the system. Fill the master. Have the bleeder at the caliper open. Be sure the lever if it has an adjuter, has play at the master. You may see bubbles rise out of the bleed port inside the master res. This is good.

Bleed slowly. You do not want to cause air to be trapped. If the brake line makes a loop higher than the master, you have have to remove the master and hold it to be the highest point. Once it seems bled, let the system rest a little while. Tap on the caliper and  brake line to set up vibrations to dislodge air bubbles. Diddle the brake (work it quickly and just barely press the master cuclinder) lever, this action will suddenly compresse and decompress any air and often free it to then travel up the brake line and out the port in the res. Look for the tiny bubbles. When they stop and regular bleeding is pure fluid, you should be done and can fully assemble the brake system. Pump the lever a few times to ensuer soild feeling. Let it rest a few minutes then press again once. If it is rock solid, you are done.

 

Be wary however, of over analyzing stuff. It gets more people in trouble than not paying attention sometimes.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I really helps to have a friend line up her holes errr I mean help in the process un-less you get something like this.

https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/p/4481/33078/Mityvac-Brake-Bleeder-Kit?v=28

 

I actually have this tool.  Would it be best to use this to bleed the brakes from dry?  I was actually going to try forcing fluid with a syringe from the caliper bleed valve.  Then do the normal bleed procedure

Link to comment
Share on other sites

as posted just snug tighten the bolts at the reservoirs and calibers.

I`m not sure why you want to bleed them dry.

I replace front and rear pad without doing the fluid BUT do check level`s etc. during the process as well as making sure there is not wear on the pins, no damage to the hoses etc.

When I do change the brake fluid I just keep bleeding and adding fluid until I feel comfortable that all the old fluid has been drained and there`s no air in the line. If the old fluid is really dark, it`s obvious when you can see the new fluid come out the nipple on the caliber.

Oh - not to be too obvious but take it for a test ride and check for leaks etc BEFORE you hit the trail

Edited by filterx
Link to comment
Share on other sites

as posted just snug tighten the bolts at the reservoirs and calibers.

I`m not sure why you want to bleed them dry.

I replace front and rear pad without doing the fluid BUT do check level`s etc. during the process as well as making sure there is not wear on the pins, no damage to the hoses etc.

When I do change the brake fluid I just keep bleeding and adding fluid until I feel comfortable that all the old fluid has been drained and there`s no air in the line. If the old fluid is really dark, it`s obvious when you can see the new fluid come out the nipple on the caliber.

Oh - not to be too obvious but take it for a test ride and check for leaks etc BEFORE you hit the trail

Read above.  I'm replacing the brake line (master cylinder too).  Obviously, no fluid in the new system.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Opps missed that.

Regardless don't over think it.

What I would do is put a tube going into a drain bottle on the nipple and loosen. Then pull the cap on the master, disconnect rear brake line at the caliper and let the fluid drain. Your really just trying to get out as much fluid as you can so it's not messy. Remove the old brake line and master, Clean everything.

Put on the new master then Put on the new line at the master first add fluid and GENTELY compress the rear brake till a bit of fluid flows out the line again not making a mess. Basically priming the system. Then attach the line to the caliber. Then bleed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did it the old fashion way and appear to have my brakes bled.  However, the brakes are still very weak!  I believe I have the brake lever/ brake piston positioned incorrectly.  Almost like the piston does not go far enough into the cylinder unless the brake lever is mashed half way to China.  How do I know where this needs to be placed?  I have about 1mm of play

Link to comment
Share on other sites

too little info...are u saying that u now have less-powerful brakes than prior to the new line?

if so, and the line was the ONLY thing u changed, then u either do not have all the air out,or

the new line has either a diff ID and/or made out of rubber vs steel-braid...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did it the old fashion way and appear to have my brakes bled.  However, the brakes are still very weak!  I believe I have the brake lever/ brake piston positioned incorrectly.  Almost like the piston does not go far enough into the cylinder unless the brake lever is mashed half way to China.  How do I know where this needs to be placed?  I have about 1mm of play

So were still taking about the rear cus I now see lever not pedal and you had someone else help you bleed them old school since it's virtually impossible to do it by your self???

As above, if the brakes were fine before you replaced the line, then either not bleed correctly, different line, or something else changed.

I have a shop manual for my Honda which helps me and I'm going at assume you have a KTM.

If you can be more specific about your bike, problem and maybe pics we could help.

If it starts to become KTM specific try posting in that forum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

×
×
  • Create New...