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Any way to make the 230 climb better?


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My 230 climbs most everything I ask it to like a goat.  With speed and momentum it does great.  On some of the really steep longer climbs (when the momentum goes away)  The motor pulls hard, the rear hooks up, but I can't get far enough forward to keep the front down.  My 230 is 3 inches shorter (wheelbase) than my buddy's bike, so that is likely causing some of the issue, then there's the short cockpit.   The guys I ride with on the 250's don't usually have the same trouble, nor do I on their bikes.  I already have the bars moved forward, so is there anything else that can be done to the bike to help keep the weight forward and the front down.

 

The bike is so easy to ride everywhere else that I'll try just about anything on it.  I'd just like improve it's ability on those hills, because it's a chore lifting that pig bag up from the low side.

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Motor stock? Simple wiseco piston, small cam and jetting will help keep momentum. Also you may check to see if you have room to slide wheel further back in swingarm??? Check preload and possible lower forks in triple clamps. You will be amazed what a tad more preload in rear and dropping forks will do when it comes to climbing hills.

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I was having the same problem and noticed that after I added a tooth to the rear that it got worse. Not because of the tooth but the fact that the rear wheel was all the way forward. Got a new chain and slid the rear as far back as I could get it and still have some adjustment. Made a big difference on hills. Did make lifting the front require a little more throttle tho.

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Yeah... it's not the motor.  It's the hills.  The long ones are such that I cant hit it with enough speed at the bottom to carry it up to the top.  It's like that point on a roller coaster when the car coasts up the hill as far as it will go, then the chain catches it and pulls it on up.  That point where momentum stops and the motor starts doing ALL the work is when the bike gets light up front.

 

My rear is pretty soft now.  It's got the correct sag and all. 

 

The triple is all the way at the top of the forks.  If that is it, would that cause the front wheel to push out of rutted turns too?  I might try lowering them some. 

 

I went back to the stock chain ring.  I may try a new chain and pushing the wheel back.

 

How far down the forks would you move the triple?

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Yeah... it's not the motor.  It's the hills.  The long ones are such that I cant hit it with enough speed at the bottom to carry it up to the top.  It's like that point on a roller coaster when the car coasts up the hill as far as it will go, then the chain catches it and pulls it on up.  That point where momentum stops and the motor starts doing ALL the work is when the bike gets light up front.

 

My rear is pretty soft now.  It's got the correct sag and all. 

 

The triple is all the way at the top of the forks.  If that is it, would that cause the front wheel to push out of rutted turns too?  I might try lowering them some. 

 

I went back to the stock chain ring.  I may try a new chain and pushing the wheel back.

 

How far down the forks would you move the triple?

One more thing. Did you let off the throttle anywhere. I see a lot of riders not knowingly let off the throttle.

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One more thing. Did you let off the throttle anywhere. I see a lot of riders not knowingly let off the throttle.

 

No.  As a matter of fact there have been a couple of times I couldn't get off the throttle even after it lifted and I looped the bike out... not fun.  I have pretty good clutch control most times, but I haven't even been able to use clutch feathering to keep the front down.

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All of the chassis and engine mods mentioned will help.

 

When on a hill weight transfers aft and more so on a short wheelbase bike. Setting rear sag at the low end or a stiffer rear spring will help keep the back up.  The opposite happens on the front so set the sag at the high end to help keep the front down,  higher rebound damping on the front also helps. 

 

Hill climbing is an aquired skill that takes practice and while a long wheelbase bike makes it easier it is still doable on a shorter wheel base bike.  

 

Body position is important so always stand and attempt to keep your body perpedicular to the earth (not the ground) so your body is alway in a neutral position on the bike.  You'll know when you have the wrong body position when you find yourself gripping the handle bars to stay on the bike. 

 

Too much traction means a more aggressive position on the bike, I have a XR218 (54" wheelbase) with a radial Trials tire and I had to remove the cross bar on the handlebars so I could get my weight further forward on steep high traction climbs.

 

You can reduce traction by increasing rear tire pressure.

 

So a multitude of small changes will improve things.

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One other thing that hasent been mentioned is gearing. You need to gear a bike for hill climbing. Whether you gear for second or third gear there should be a gear that propels the bike with the fastest speed without bogging or running out of power.

Even 450 and 500's need to be geared for hill climbing. I rode a KTM 500 that barley made the hill my WR450 easily made. It wouldn't pull third gear and hit the rev limiter in second half way up the hill.

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Are you sitting or standing when the front end likes to come up too easily?

 

I went to Royal Blue Tuesday and we rode the various loops.  I'm still really amazed at how easy my bike is to ride and how easy it is to climb stuff, the front end never tries to come up.  I do sit most of the time. 

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