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brake job oem vs. aftermarket


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Need to do rear brakes on my 97xr4....oem rear pads are so expensive. What alternative aftermarket brand do you use and which type do u suggest (carbon, metallic, sinister??). A little overwhelmed w options!

Thx

 

Hi mate, I've bought these ones off Ebay just need to get round to fitting them..

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Honda-XR-400-RT-1996-Rear-Sintered-Disc-Brake-Pads-/200813708178?pt=UK_Motorcycle_Parts_13&hash=item2ec16e0392 

 

Can't complain with the price and I think I was told to go sintered on the back, still not quite sure what it means lol.

 

It says on the ad they are suitable for everyday road/off road riding so happy days.

 

Hope this helps mate.

Edited by Sam Foster
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I would just go with normal sintered pads. Any expensive racing pads will be useless to anyone not racing competitivley. Racing pads are better.... when theyre hot, from cold theyre crap! So unless youre keeping alot of heat in your brakes then youre just losing performance by fitting performance pads (ironic eh).

I have heard though, cheap pads have a harder material so they wear out the disc quicker.... wether there is much truth to that i dont know

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Buy OEM unless you have a special requirement.

A lot of aftermarket pads are high performance with a higher coefficient of friction that reduces pedal/lever effort but they grabby at low speeds, not good for low traction situations. 

 

Pads sold in the USA must have a two letter performance code on the edge of the lining, commonly referred to as "Edge Codes",  I've also found the codes on dirt bike pads.  The coeficient of friction for the different grades can be 2 to 1 so a big difference in grabby.

http://faculty.ccbcmd.edu/~smacadof/DOTPadCodes.htm

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Got oem....can't I just squeeze piston then insert new pads?

 

 

Yes, you can. These guys just state what is usually the prudent thing to do at the same time as replacing the pads, but doesn't mean its a must.

 

Watch your fluid reservoir when you push the pads in. You'll be pushing fluid back into it and you don't want it completely topped off when you're done installing the new pads and have them seated to the rotor after pumping the brake pedal back up. If you have too, take a little out, as you want a little air at the top to allow for expansion.

 

I recommend setting it to just below the upper fill line on the reservoir.

Edited by Trailryder42
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