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Battery jumpstarter good idea or not


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I have had several misadventures over the years with the 650 battery , every time I ended up calling road assistance and they would jumpstart the battery in seconds with a big jumpstarter for cars they carry with them . I am thinking about getting one myself so I don't have to fret about being able to start the bike in winter in an emergency, and I don't have to run the bike pretty much every week in the winter otherwise the battery goes dead, neither do I have to remove the battery (which I replaced about two years ago but already makes the starter reluctant if I haven't ridden the bike in two weeks) . 

The 650 is my main transportation and the fickle starter and battery don't make it ultra reliable especially in winter times, not to mention the ew times I left the back light on .  Having a jumpstarter would give me some peace of mind but I read those aren't recommended for bikes,

Edited by firsthumper
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Any 12 volt battery, or jump starter for that matter, can be used to start the bike without damage. What you do not want to do is jump start it from a larger vehicle that is running. A car electrical system generates around 14 volts and has far more current capacity than the small voltage regulator of DR can handle safely. So, if you jump it off from a car do so with the engine off.

Most likely the reason your battery is unreliable is because you have run it dead several times by leaving the tail light on. Lead acid batteries, particularly the small ones used in motorcycles, do not tolerate being run completely dead repeatedly. The plates sulfonate and never quite recover. Bottom line - You need a new battery. I have had excellent experience with the inexpensive AGM batteries sold by chromebattery.com. Their battery for the DR650 is less than $30 delivered in the USA. If the DR were my only transportation I would consider buying a new one every year at that price.

Also, perhaps your riding distance is not sufficient to recharge the battery after starting. Extended use in city traffic will deplete the battery also since they charging system can't keep up with turn signals and brake lights at idle. Sounds to me as if you are a candidate for some type of battery tender or float charger when parking overnight.

Edited by TN2Wheeler
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I am now thinking about just getting cables, the idea is to never find myself stranded in an emergency. Obviously I can't travel with a jumpstarter.  With cables I only need someone else with a car and willing to help. Regarding battery tenders/float chargers (are those the same thing with different name ?)

I almost got a cheap one recently but although I think it said it was good for bikes I wasn't sure it would be good. Anyway it requires plugging it somewhere and taking the seat off every time (plus some monitoring) , About as bothersome as riding the bike at leats once a week.  

Edited by firsthumper
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I have these SAE connectors on all my bikes and use inexpensive float chargers from harbor freight to maintain the batteries when stored. I also discharge the battery slightly from time to time by turning on the light for a few minutes just to cycle it. The connector is wired directly to the battery and doubles as a source for my electric vest when the weather is chilly.

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Sounds like you need to consider plugging your bike into a battery tender when it's not in use.  If that's not possible then jumping it will end up being something that you need to get to be good at doing.  As someone else already posted, it sounds like you do not ride far enough after starting it to fully charge the battery.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Having considerable experience  working on the DR-650 electrical system, i can say that the regulator does not play a part in the jump starting until the engine actually starts. So its' size is pretty much irrelevent.

 

I run a LiIon battery in my 650 and i keep it on a battery tender during the winter when i am not riding,

 

You could buy a LiIon battery and keep it as a spare and jump start with it when required?

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I found out that mine fails to start and everything is dead.  NO horn or turn signals.  I remove the battery and clean the terminals and all connectors with a pocket knife untill i see bright new metal.  Then diielectric grease the fittings and terminals.  bike has started every time.  I think the problem has been a build up of crud on everything.

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Having considerable experience working on the DR-650 electrical system, i can say that the regulator does not play a part in the jump starting until the engine actually starts. So its' size is pretty much irrelevent.

I run a LiIon battery in my 650 and i keep it on a battery tender during the winter when i am not riding,

You could buy a LiIon battery and keep it as a spare and jump start with it when required?

The VR/R capacity IS relevant when jump starting from a larger vehicle because it will try to control the voltage applied to the electrical system from the external source. If that voltage and current is from a high capacity charging system like an automobile it will quickly overheat and destroy itself. That's why you do not want to jump start a motorcycle from a running automobile. If the car engine is off the voltage is only 12.6 volts and is safe.

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"vehicleicon1.png because it will try to control the voltage applied to the electrical system"

 

The connection to the battery is on the 'wrong' side of the regulator.

 

May i respectfully suggest looking at a schematic. I have replaced my voltage regulator with a different unit that is designed to handle larger charging currents than the OEM Suzuki regulator.  The pass transistors in a voltage regulator block the reverse flow of current from the battery ... that is why your battery does not discharge through the regulator while sitting.  Having jump started many bikes over the years from a running engine i have yet to have a failure of the regulator.

 

Hope you have a nice holiday.

 

Cheers

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I think I found what I need. I took a pass on the engine starter a few weeks ago, but have now 

found an automatic battery charger coupled wih an emergency engine starter, it looks very similar

to the Diehard  75/12/2 Amp charger and starter available at Walmart for those who are familiar 

with Walmart and is a much smaller unit which I could even take with me on long trips.

 

http://www.walmart.com/ip/410-Watt-Digital-DC-to-AC-Power-Inverter/15140189

 

It charges at 12, 6 or 2 Amp and helps jumpstart the engine at 75 Amp.

 

However unlike the Diehard unit it makes no mention that it can be used on bikes.

And the instructions are full of warnings about things that can blow up in your face

if you do something wrong (it does have an automatic system to stop the charging

process once the battery is full). 

 

Would that be safe to use on the DR 650 and 350 ? 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I read you should never use a battery charger designed for cars, as the the current is too high and will damage a motorcycle battery, charging current should be 1/10 of the battery capacity so 800 milliamps in the case of the  YTX 9 BS used in the DR 650 . The charger I got charges at 2 6 and 12 A (6/12 Volts). The battery shows two charging methods : 0.9 A for 5-10 hours, or 4 A for 1 hour. Is it OK then to charge at 2 A ?

All this stuff to learn to charge a battery... it  starts to make my head spin ....

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  • 2 weeks later...

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