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When mounting new rubber for the first time..


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And you need at least 3 spoons...4 is better! Some great vids online that helped me a lot on the first couple tires. Just you-tube changing dirt bike tires.

 

Some hard lessons learned: 

1) Always start new tire install at the rim lock (nut barely started), and make sure it's fully inside tire.

2) Soapy water in squirt bottle works better than windex (especially for setting bead). 

3) It may take at least 45 or more psi to set the bead (keep removing stem, and then refilling).

4) Fully tighten rim lock while tire has lots of psi (just after bead is set on both sides)

5) New RimShield II from motion pro good for anodized/colored rims to keep from scratching (get 4).

6) lightly fill new tube to keep from pinching and damaging during spoon-on. 

7) When spooning on, try not to go past 90 degrees up with spoons to avoid pinching tubes.

8) Take small "bites" when needed, too large bites make it impossible.

9) pinch opposite side of tire (knee works good) into rim "valley", for more "give" on spooning side.

 

Well there are more, but those are good things to think about. And please, for the love of everything holy, don't use your large screwdrivers to change tires! 

 

Peace!

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Some one on this site said that it doesn't work on 21 in rims.

That was me, it works but needs more teeth on the rack part to make it useful on 21 inchers.

I do use my no pinch all the time, its better than nothing, but far from a perfected tool.

If you can mount it, the harbor freight tire changer is fastest ive ever used. I used to change tires every 2-4 weeks.

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I have 3 spoons but end up using just two 8" motion pro polished ones. I watched a bunch of videos, etc, too, and one thing that stuck: if it's too hard, you're doing something wrong. Any time I started to struggle, I'd push the rim back down into the body of the tire and it would give me enough room to work.

Anyone have opinions on tire grease that they can pack in their tool kit?

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I have 3 spoons but end up using just two 8" motion pro polished ones. I watched a bunch of videos, etc, too, and one thing that stuck: if it's too hard, you're doing something wrong. Any time I started to struggle, I'd push the rim back down into the body of the tire and it would give me enough room to work.

Anyone have opinions on tire grease that they can pack in their tool kit?

I've got a little leak proof bottle with flip top squirter spout (maybe 4 oz. or so) that I'm filling with water and a good squirt of dawn detergent for "on the trail" spooning needs. Of course, on trail, you only need to do one side of the tire to get the tube out for repair or replace...so less work than tire "change". I shy away from grease,  wd40, etc. for rim lube, as I only use one rim lock and don't want to rip a valve stem off. By the way,  you  should never tighten supplied nut on tube valve stem against the rim....back it up against the valve stem cap.  This way you can see if your tube is slipping and fix it before you rip the valve stem off. Even better, get the cool honda style valve stem rubber grommets like they sell at rocky mt atv. They look cool and keep water/mud/dirt our of your rim. 

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