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Help! Water in Engine Oil!


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Hello All,

 

I just emptied the engine oil out of my 1998 XR250R to find that it is a milky green/grey/white color. I presume that this means water is in my engine oil. I recently went riding at Tahuya on 2 wet, rainy days, during which I did not once flood the bike or tip it over, etc. The bike has been sitting for 2 weeks with this water/oil in it. What should I do?! How did water get in my oil?! How much damage has been done to my bike!? Thank you all in advance, ANY advice is appreciated. I have NOT put oil back in the bike, but have new oil and a filter ready to go. 

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I had a I/O boat motor (351 W) that got flooded and the oil looked like coffee with a lot of cream in it.

 

I drained the oil/filter and then filled it with diesel and just spun it over a couple of times (not start) and drained that and then did the same with a light weight oil.

 

on 2nd refill with oil I started it and let it run for about 60 seconds and changed oil/filter again, and kept doing it until the oil was no longer creamy looking.  ran good after that.  I had used about 4 gallons of cheap oil but that was still a lot cheaper than a whole motor.

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Alright. I drained the initial water/oil, and I replaced the filter. Refilled with standard engine oil. Rode the bike around on and off for a day all on pavement. Drained the oil, removed the filter. Oil looked very clear, with the exception of the last few drips of oil still being a milky color. I refilled the oil again, and added another new filter. Rode the bike a few times until completely warmed up. Dipstik oil looks clear. Some milky residue is still around the fill neck threads. IS THIS ENOUGH OR DO I NEED TO DO YET ANOTHER COSTLY OIL CHANGE?

 

My '98 XR250R has the crankcase breather running both below the bike and up to under the seat stock. Neither ends of the breather have a filter. I suspect that this copious amount of water came from the lower breather hose, which actually was underwater for much of the time I was riding (up to 2 ft deep puddles). I rerouted the breather so that it only has one hose which runs to a uni crankcase breather filter under the seat. IS THIS ENOUGH OF A PREVENTATIVE MEASURE SO THAT I CAN AGAIN RIDE TAHUYA WITHOUT DAMAGING MY MACHINE? 

 

I while performing the oil changes also noticed lots of small nicks and chips out of the bottom of the crankcase. I also noticed numerous small dents in the bottom of the frame with minor rusting. In your collective experience, HOW MUCH DOES ONE NEED A SKID PLATE? ANY IDEAS FOR CHEAP HOME MADE SKID PLATES/PROTECTION FOR MY CASE?

 

Thank you all so much for the help, I really appreciate all that you TT users have helped me with!

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Your oil should be good. Wipe the residue from the oil filler neck and the dipstick, they should be clean so you can notice any additional moisture.

Getting the motor good an warm will dry it out.

 

A stock skid plate off ebay used at a minimum. Lots of guys have made custom ones also. I used a stock for many years and was just fine.

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I have the stock skid pipe/guard currently on the bike. It seems to do an ok job of protecting against logs/roots but does nothing to stop rocks. I agree trailryder42 I don't really need to ask this question, just really tight on money and not wanting to sink even more into my bike. But that's enduro/dirt biking! And the consequences could be much worse without a skid plate... 

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 But that's enduro/dirt biking! And the consequences could be much worse without a skid plate... 

 

Exactly. Protecting your cases and frame with a real bashplate is not dumping money into it. Dumping money into it is expensive engine and frame repairs when they could have been avoided on the cheap in the first place.

 

With money being tight for such expensive repairs, you can't afford not to put a bashplate on it. That or quit riding the bike off road until such time you can afford to eqiup it properly.

Edited by Trailryder42
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Exactly. Protecting your cases and frame with a real bashplate is not dumping money into it. Dumping money into it is expensive engine and frame repairs when they could have been avoided on the cheap in the first place.

 

With money being tight for such expensive repairs, you can't afford not to put a bashplate on it. That or quit riding the bike off road until such time you can afford to eqiup it properly.

Ordered an MSR Aluminum Bashplate today. Should do the trick. Going to install it once it arrives and also install a new nitrogen bladder and clips+seals on my rear shock, then back to riding!

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