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Bike that improves technique


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I want a 4t bike that I will ride trails that will build my riding skill I know a 125 2t is perfect but my dad will not let me get a 2t I can't really argue I am only 12 almost 13 and I currently ride a crf230 and my skills don't seem to be improving. I weigh about 50 kg if that helps

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think riding a bike that is considered  too small for you is a great way to gain confidence and learn new techniques. With a small bike, you can throw it around and pick it up easier afeter a fall.  I'm an old guy that got back into dirt bikes after 25 years, I'm 195 and six foot and I started back up with a crf 230 ( considered too small for me). I can still go places on this bike I wouldn't dare try with my klx 250. The low seat height and tractable power with good off idle snap but nothing explosive is soo forgiving. Even if you want to be fast, try to master the slow stuff like log crossings etc. before you move to a bigger more powerfull bike. Have fun!

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The best way to improve is to ride ride ride . Study videos and read tips. Them practice what you have studied. No bike will magically improve you ability. Granted smaller bikes are easier to ride, you still need to learn proper technique.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Go bigger and faster with your bike. You are a kid and kids don't see a stand still in their progress...your bike is too slow now. Especially kids willing to get on a dirt bike. When I was 13 I couldn't lift my kdx200 off the ground without help but humungous improvement in skill after the yz80. Your dad is right about the four strokes and you are talking to someone who once thought the kx500 was the meanest bike out there. Oil in gas hassle is gone, you can't foul a plug when that trail takes you way up high into the mountains, they don't vibrate very bad and bolts don't rattle out much. Oh ya...if you get a big bike it must have a push button start...just trust a short guy like me on that one. Thumpertalk thumpertalk thumpertalk - ask how to do things. You cannot learn things by just riding all the time. Examples: grip the tank with your knees and before you get to a really tough spot in a trail leave a finger or two out for clutching...if it isn't out already it won't come out when you are fighting to stay on, and one more- rotate your handlebars back a bit from center and try to ride elbows out...you won't get bad forearm pump again. I guess one more...never ever regrip...that is reaching for more throttle while riding. When you take off from a stand still that hand stays where it is or you will get the dreaded panic throttle. Hope this helps and if you don't like my answers there are hundreds of people that will enjoy advising you and maybe their answers are better. Later Ese

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I am a long time 4 stoker that has recently went back in time to the age old technology of the 2 stroke... My personal thoughts, are a 4 stroke is a great bike easy and forgiving to ride...The power is smooth and consistent and can get you out of trouble when you need it... When I switched to a 2 smoke I was somewhat disappointed, especially coming off a fuel injected 4 stroke bad boy.. But after a month or two on the smoker I realized how much my riding and technique (clutching) had improved.. I believe the two stroke makes you a better rider, and you learn to respect the power and learn to control it... I am not one to sway you against your father, but I think he should be open to your thoughts and proud of a son with ambition to get better... I have two boys and when they say they want to ride and learn... I drop whatever I am doing to help them with their riding... Keep up the drive and focus on making yourself better all the time, 2 or 4 stroke its all good and ride ride ride....

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  • 4 weeks later...

The skills you will get from riding one of these will further your riding faster than most anything out there. Best hard enduro riders in the world most all started with one and developed their skills and low speed control first, the transition to speed and a bigger bike and winning is way faster. If only I had it to do all over again and had this advice, I'd be unstoppable today. Jarvise, Walker and Taddy Blazusiak are just a few super stars that became the talented riders they are today in just this very way. 

 

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Edited by Pittbull
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 If only I had it to do all over again and had this advice, I'd be unstoppable today. Jarvise, Walker and Taddy Blazusiak are just a few super stars that became the talented riders they are today in just this very way. 

 

 

Hell, there's Colton Haaker, Geoff Aaron, Cody Webb amongst others that started on trials bikes..

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Seat time is one thing for sure but IMO there is no replacing the skills you will learn on a trial bike. Balance, clutch control, self confidence, slow speed obstacles / hill climbs / braking all this is so much easier to learn and once mastered the offroad world will be your oyster. 

 

+1, I always considered myself a decent technical rider, but once I starting riding the trials bike, everything just seemed to click. Really technical trails are a great equalizer for some of us. I occasionally ride with some AA and A guys that give me fits in the faster sections, but once we go up a creek bed or a nasty hillclimb, I can turn the tables on them a bit.

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