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Fender Improvements / Mud Protection and Prevention


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I don't like mud.

I don't go looking for it.

I try to avoid it when possible.

 

However, there will always be some where I ride.

Mud Puddles, wet soil, etc.

 

I'd like to figure out how to improve my fenders or add to what I have to keep mud out of the hard to reach spots, the sensitive areas and even off of me.  Mud is going to get on it but I'd like to make the surface flatter, maybe with no hardware, no nooks and crannies.

 

I'm in the process of making a much longer and wider skid plate, not only for engine protection but also for mud protection for the motor from the front tire.  It will extend up to where my CRF450R front fender stops.

 

For the rear, I was considering making a thin flat fender liner that would extend from the top of the swingarm in front of the rear tire clear back to the back edge of the rear fender.

I'd like to keep mud away from the shock, the muffler, the inside surface of the number plates, etc.

The OE shock guard does a great job and I'll definitely keep it in place.

 

I was also wondering if some sort of rear swing arm mounted "hugger" fender would work/fit/help.

I don't think I've ever seen a hugger type of fender on a dirt bike.

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You are wasting your time. The mud is still get everywhere. Then you will need to take all the protection off just to clean under it.

Spray your bike down with WD40 or Pledge to help make it easier to clean.

We spray the whole bike with Lemon Pledge to make it shiny and so the mud sticks far less to the under sides of fenders and motor.

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A little early for April fools isn't it?

Maybe "dirt" is a harsh word. Maybe to be a little more politically correct you could call it a 'soil bike " or maybe even an" earth bike". You could even write a letter to Honda and ask them just what the big idea is with all the "nooks and crannies" and how they sould be eliminated in production... I mean nooks and crannies belong in English muffins not earth bikes! ; ^ )

Tech25

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You are wasting your time. The mud is still get everywhere. Then you will need to take all the protection off just to clean under it.

Spray your bike down with WD40 or Pledge to help make it easier to clean.

We spray the whole bike with Lemon Pledge to make it shiny and so the mud sticks far less to the under sides of fenders and motor.

 

A little early for April fools isn't it?

Maybe "dirt" is a harsh word. Maybe to be a little more politically correct you could call it a 'soil bike " or maybe even an" earth bike". You could even write a letter to Honda and ask them just what the big idea is with all the "nooks and crannies" and how they sould be eliminated in production... I mean nooks and crannies belong in English muffins not earth bikes! ; ^ )

Tech25

 

Thank you so much for your insightful input.

Looks like both y'all ride in the desert or drier climates so I don't expect your sympathy or understanding.

I've tried the WD-40 route, might need to try Pledge next.

 

Up front, it's necessary to keep mud from collecting on the front of the cylinder head.

My special new custom designed skid plate will fix that issue.

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I used to live and ride in Maryland and Pennsylvania, so I'm no stranger to the slop you ride in. What I did was purchase a pressure washer, I covered the intake and exhaust and I avoided the obvious areas. I figured it would make life easy seeing as how every off road machine I've ever owned had those pesky nooks and crannies.

Tech25

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Dirt bikes are easy to clean IMHO

Try cleaning a quad or a side by side after a day of mud riding .....

You won't mind cleaning your little dirt bike as much after that.

I refuse to ride my quads in anything but sand since 1986 just for that reason alone.....

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  • 1 year later...

You are wasting your time. The mud is still get everywhere. Then you will need to take all the protection off just to clean under it.

Spray your bike down with WD40 or Pledge to help make it easier to clean.

We spray the whole bike with Lemon Pledge to make it shiny and so the mud sticks far less to the under sides of fenders and motor.

 

 

A little early for April fools isn't it?

Maybe "dirt" is a harsh word. Maybe to be a little more politically correct you could call it a 'soil bike " or maybe even an" earth bike". You could even write a letter to Honda and ask them just what the big idea is with all the "nooks and crannies" and how they sould be eliminated in production... I mean nooks and crannies belong in English muffins not earth bikes! ; ^ )

Tech25

 

Well I just tried out my new "anti-mud" device and it worked very well.

 

IMG_20160512_142143921.jpg

 

This is the front of the head prior to any cleaning, stayed mud free all day and I went thru lots.

 

IMG_20160512_142157680.jpg

 

I used to live and ride in Maryland and Pennsylvania, so I'm no stranger to the slop you ride in. What I did was purchase a pressure washer, I covered the intake and exhaust and I avoided the obvious areas. I figured it would make life easy seeing as how every off road machine I've ever owned had those pesky nooks and crannies.

Tech25

 

Pressure washer is wonderful, can't believe I waited so long to try mine on the CRF.

 

Dirt bikes are easy to clean IMHO

Try cleaning a quad or a side by side after a day of mud riding .....

You won't mind cleaning your little dirt bike as much after that.

I refuse to ride my quads in anything but sand since 1986 just for that reason alone.....

 

My friends all ride quads and SxS, they spend hours cleaning.  That'd drive me crazy!

 

Didn't they invent quads in 1986? 🙂

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I may just patent this wonderful idea of mine.

 

Do you think the name "Fender Labia" would offend too many?

 

Are we allowed to use the word labia here in the technical section?

 

You'd spend more money on the patent than you'd make in 10 years. Labia? I said it and it worked, so must be ok.😉

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Well I just tried out my new "anti-mud" device and it worked very well.

 

IMG_20160512_142143921.jpg

 

This is the front of the head prior to any cleaning, stayed mud free all day and I went thru lots.

 

IMG_20160512_142157680.jpg

 

 

Pressure washer is wonderful, can't believe I waited so long to try mine on the CRF.

 

 

My friends all ride quads and SxS, they spend hours cleaning.  That'd drive me crazy!

 

Didn't they invent quads in 1986? 🙂

 

Nice idea to reduce mud on the engine but it also blocks airflow, probly not a problem as the temps aren't too high when there is mud and water.  I've seen 400F+ on my Vapor with a long fender on my XR200 in the mountains on a summer day, but much less when using a Honda air cooled fender. 

 

One idea you might try that will also keep mud off the cylinder is a horizontal extension on the front of the skid plate, with a crescent cutout to clear the tire during fork compression.  Years ago I had one on a BSA 500 for mud scrambles and it worked great. I made mine out of aluminum and used a muffler U clamp to mount it on the downube, but I'm sure there are other mounting options.

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Nice idea to reduce mud on the engine but it also blocks airflow, probly not a problem as the temps aren't too high when there is mud and water.  I've seen 400F+ on my Vapor with a long fender on my XR200 in the mountains on a summer day, but much less when using a Honda air cooled fender. 

 

One idea you might try that will also keep mud off the cylinder is a horizontal extension on the front of the skid plate, with a crescent cutout to clear the tire during fork compression.  Years ago I had one on a BSA 500 for mud scrambles and it worked great. I made mine out of aluminum and used a muffler U clamp to mount it on the downube, but I'm sure there are other mounting options.

 

I'll be making a new ULTIMATE skid plate which will incorporate a horizontal extension.  I believe it was either you or TEAMRUDE who posted one in another thread.  Cooling doesn't seem to be a problem, especially where I ride.  I doubt you would have any issues either from what I've read about how an air-cooled motorcycle head and cylinder cool.  Not to mention this.

 

9088513_ATC250es.jpg

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I'll be making a new ULTIMATE skid plate which will incorporate a horizontal extension.  I believe it was either you or TEAMRUDE who posted one in another thread.  Cooling doesn't seem to be a problem, especially where I ride.  I doubt you would have any issues either from what I've read about how an air-cooled motorcycle head and cylinder cool.  Not to mention this.

 

9088513_ATC250es.jpg

Neat pic, no HP you don't need air flow.🤣

Air flow is what cools, and heat kills.

I've run Vapors on several air cooled bikes and also dyno testing, both with the temp sensor as part of the spark plug sealing washer. That position provides quick response to head temperatures.

On a dyno at full load bad things begin to happen when the cyl head  temp goes above 400F, not so much at part throttle low load. 

So we do have some tolerance for cylinder temps, but oil flows to the head and will absorb heat.

Edited by Chuck.
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