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Correct me if i am wrong. I have always been told to use antiseize on virtually everything you dissasembly regularly on a motocross bike. I mostly take off the plastics and seat at cleaning and reassemble using antiseize. Will this affect torque? Is it better to no use antiseize and just clean the bolts?

Thank you

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Correct me if i am wrong. I have always been told to use antiseize on virtually everything you dissasembly regularly on a motocross bike. I mostly take off the plastics and seat at cleaning and reassemble using antiseize. Will this affect torque? Is it better to no use antiseize and just clean the bolts?

Thank you

 

Or just use a little bit of grease works just as well.

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Anti-seize is the greatest thing since sliced bread!

I work on pumps and turbines everyday in a major refinery and never skip a day of using it on anything that I may have to take apart again.

Especially equipment that sees hot and cold cycles.

Torque values are given with the assumption that thread lubricant is being used.

If you are "torquing" bolts for Plastic, I would definitely not torque to spec, only metal to metal. 

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Anti-seize is the greatest thing since sliced bread!

I work on pumps and turbines everyday in a major refinery and never skip a day of using it on anything that I may have to take apart again.

Especially equipment that sees hot and cold cycles.

Torque values are given with the assumption that thread lubricant is being used.

If you are "torquing" bolts for Plastic, I would definitely not torque to spec, only metal to metal. 

BS

 

Use anti-seize with discretion. It will affect torque values if you use it on the bolt threads and not affect torque if you use it on the bolt shoulders. You can find torque calculators that will address wet vs. dry

Why are you using it in areas that are routinely removed and serviced on a regular basis? There is no time for a bolt to seize.

Using grease on the shoulders of the swing-arm/ linkage and engine mounting bolts is a great thing to do but there is no need to use it on the bolt threads. These bolts will not seize unless you leave your bike in salt water while you’re not riding it.

Use the torque guidelines of your OEM service manual.

Torque values are always given dry unless noted otherwise

Edited by AXAxiom
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Published torque specs for fasteners are for clean dry threads, any lubricant requires a reduction in torque values.

Antiseize compounds are designed for high temperature applications which I haven't found a need for on dirt bikes.

I've found common grease easier to use on shank and shoulders than anti-seize compound, plus anti-seize is messy to use. 

JAS Metric thread forms seem much better than SAE for resistance to loosening and ease of removal.

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Some commonly used cleaners, Spray Nine, Super Clean etc. can leave some sort of 'galvanic corrosion'

(not sure if proper term) when they seep into certain areas. I service a couple of friend's dirtbikes not usualy 

treated with anti-seize and often notice small bolts like radiator shrouds or gas tank mountings etc. that have

a dry crusty-like white coating on them, sometimes making them harder to remove due to resistance in the threads.

 

My bike is washed with the same cleaners as them and never gets that build-up on bolts that are *lightly* coated with anti-seize.

 

I service my bike religiously but I'd rather not risk any stripped or damaged fasteners, a light coating is a bit of 'insurance' to me if you will.

 

( I am a licensed electro-mechanic in automated industrial systems for close to 20 years, if that matters to you)

Edited by mlatour
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Some commonly used cleaners, Spray Nine, Super Clean etc. can leave some sort of 'galvanic corrosion'

(not sure if proper term) when they seep into certain areas. I service a couple of friend's dirtbikes not usualy 

treated with anti-seize and often notice small bolts like radiator shrouds or gas tanks mountings that

have a dry crusty-like white coating on them, sometimes making them harder to remove due to resistance in the threads.

 

My bike is washed with the same cleaners as them and never get that build-up on bolts that are *lightly* coated with anti-seize.

 

( I am a licensed electro-mechanic in automated industrial systems for close to 20 years, if that matters to you)

 

Lots of cleaners are corrosive when used on aluminum. also sealants such as RTV is extremely corrosive when used on aluminum.

I would suggest using a different cleaner because the dry crusty white sounds like aluminum corrosion.

That could also be from "difference of metals" corrosion, aluminum bolts into steel retainers, that would be a case to use a touch of anti-seize

Edited by AXAxiom
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Antiseize is good for wheel nuts never felt the need to use it on my bike... Just my 2 cents

 

Careful with your wheel studs,

 

a long time ago before I knew about torquing principals I used to put a few drops of oil

on my pick-up's wheel studs each spring/fall when switching over from winter/summer tires

maybe you'll end up like I did with 20 slightly stretched wheel studs that the lugs nuts

had difficulty threading on, and were then of questionable intergrity.

 

About 5 years ago I was working for a company which by coincidence tested and calibrated

torquing tools, testing equipment always prooved this theory right. Adding lube to a fastener

reduces friction, using the same torque values as specified for a dry bolt always ends up over-tightening it.

 

Trucking companies are often sued for loosing wheel assemblies on the highway,

over-torqued wheel studs are prone to shearing off.

Edited by mlatour
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 I strip/over tighten enough nuts and bolts without the help...

 

Try using a tool with a shorter handle / less leverage if you have the habit of snugging down small bolts too much.

Last summer I've started using only my 8,10 & 12mm T-handles instead of a ratchet/socket on smaller fasteners and I haven't damaged any since.

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Try using a tool with a shorter handle / less leverage if you have the habit of snugging down small bolts too much.

Last summer I've started using only my 8,10 & 12mm T-handles instead of a ratchet/socket on smaller fasteners and I haven't damaged any since.

Good idea, i have been just tryng to remember to not even use the handle on smaller stuff, i will just grab it directly above the socket thus doing pretty much what you explained.

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You have no problems, is that why it's completely tore apart?

Hey smart guy, First I never said I don't have any problems, second do you really think what's going on here has anything to do with what we are talking about here.

I don't really care about what you think is a smart comment but so other people her don't take your comment wrong.

This is my sons old track bike. This means it was ridden hard and put away wet.... Anyway, we had a valve spring break and I don't have the tools to replace the damaged guide. I rebuilt the top end the last 2 times and I knew the crank was close to out of spec. So I took the motor out and brought it to a friend that has the tools and the time to fix the valves and check the bottom end. So, I'm cleaning and repacking all the suspension and axles bearings. And guess what Rooster72 not 1 seized nut or bolt. I do regularly maintain my bikes so that could be why I don't have any seized nuts or bolts.

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Careful with your wheel studs,

a long time ago before I knew about torquing principals I used to put a few drops of oil

on my pick-up's wheel studs each spring/fall when switching over from winter/summer tires

maybe you'll end up like I did with 20 slightly stretched wheel studs that the lugs nuts

had difficulty threading on, and were then of questionable intergrity.

About 5 years ago I was working for a company which by coincidence tested and calibrated

torquing tools, testing equipment always prooved this theory right. Adding lube to a fastener

reduces friction, using the same torque values as specified for a dry bolt always ends up over-tightening it.

Trucking companies are often sued for loosing wheel assemblies on the highway,

over-torqued wheel studs are prone to shearing off.

Well haven't had any wheel studs shear off yet aside from the time after we took one of our trucks to the tire shop haha
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Anti-sieze.... lmbo.. i use thread lock for anything i dont have to take off often. Its what the manual tells me. I like anti-sieze for the large 3/4" bolts that sit in crap for years. The head of the bolt will rust to crap but weld on a stud bolt and it backs out like butter after all the years. Little heat helps too. 😉

I suppose there's a few spots on the bike it wouldn't hurt but nothing regular moly grease wouldnt work just as well.

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