Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

How often to rebuild top end?

Recommended Posts

I bought myself a brand new 2014 crf 150r that i worked all summer for (totally worth it). Wondering on how often i should replace the top end, And also how hard that is. I'm about 6 foot and 200 pounds. Dont race but dont ride it easy either. Any tips on how to set up shocks and how often to change oil/clean air filter would be appreciated.  pretty new to race bikes so anyone with expirence that has insight please leave a response. I want to do the top end myself. Have worked on motors before but not one this expensive. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow 6'/200lbs that's a little big for a CRF150R, don't you feel cramped at all riding it?

(I'm 5'8"/170lbs and feel way too cramped on my friend's 150)

 

The stock suspension spring rates are very likely way too soft for your weight

(that bike is mostly set-up for smaller riders in the 120-140lbs range)

The current springs might be ok for mild trail riding but limits the suspension/handling performance for

some faster paced riding and jumping. You should really consider upgrading your fork and shock springs to match your weight.

 

If you don't race and mostly trail ride, you won't have to worry about any engine work

for many seasons just by doing regular maintenance like air filter and oil changes and valve adjustments.

 

I suggest you buy the Honda service manual, and read it over and over.

It will have the answers to 90% of all your current and future questions about the bike,

plus basic suspension and carburation adjustment tips.

 

Also search for tuning/maintenance tips on YouTube.

Edited by mlatour
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow 6'/200lbs that's a little big for a CRF150R, don't you feel cramped at all riding it?

(I'm 5'8"/170lbs and feel way too cramped on my friend's 150)

 

The stock suspension spring rates are very likely way too soft for your weight

(that bike is mostly set-up for smaller riders in the 120-140lbs range)

The current springs might be ok for mild trail riding but limits the suspension/handling performance for

some faster paced riding and jumping. You should really consider upgrading your fork and shock springs to match your weight.

 

If you don't race and mostly trail ride, you won't have to worry about any engine work

for many seasons just by doing regular maintenance like air filter and oil changes and valve adjustments.

 

I suggest you buy the Honda service manual, and read it over and over.

It will have the answers to 90% of all your current and future questions about the bike,

plus basic suspension and carburation adjustment tips.

 

Also search for tuning/maintenance tips on YouTube.

 

This is a very well-considered response. I would add two things.

 

You can ride hard without hitting the rev-limiter, and I encourage you to do so. Then you won't have to worry about frequent rebuilds. 

 

Also, have a look at Paul Olesen's Moto Mind blog on TT. He's currently doing a series on shop setup, tool selection, and 4-stroke rebuilding. It is seriously good stuff:

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/blog/7-moto-mind/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow 6'/200lbs that's a little big for a CRF150R, don't you feel cramped at all riding it?

(I'm 5'8"/170lbs and feel way too cramped on my friend's 150)

 

The stock suspension spring rates are very likely way too soft for your weight

(that bike is mostly set-up for smaller riders in the 120-140lbs range)

The current springs might be ok for mild trail riding but limits the suspension/handling performance for

some faster paced riding and jumping. You should really consider upgrading your fork and shock springs to match your weight.

 

If you don't race and mostly trail ride, you won't have to worry about any engine work

for many seasons just by doing regular maintenance like air filter and oil changes and valve adjustments.

 

I suggest you buy the Honda service manual, and read it over and over.

It will have the answers to 90% of all your current and future questions about the bike,

plus basic suspension and carburation adjustment tips.

 

Also search for tuning/maintenance tips on YouTube.

no. Dont feel cramped its a lot different  from riding my crf70 so maybe thats why. But i mainly trail ride and go to the occasional track. I was looking at a crf250r but it was 2 grand more and i couldn't bring myself to spend the extra money.

This is a very well-considered response. I would add two things.

 

You can ride hard without hitting the rev-limiter, and I encourage you to do so. Then you won't have to worry about frequent rebuilds. 

 

Also, have a look at Paul Olesen's Moto Mind blog on TT. He's currently doing a series on shop setup, tool selection, and 4-stroke rebuilding. It is seriously good stuff:

 

http://www.thumpertalk.com/blog/7-moto-mind/

Thanks for the tips and links. Looking through them right now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6'7" and rode a crf150r big wheel for a few years, it's a great bike.  I replaced my engine oil every other ride and the filter every other oil change.  I cleaned my air filter after every ride and I never had problems with my 08, I had it 5 years.  Just get the suspension done for your weight and you will be fine.  For me it was the ultimate pit bike, I'd take another just for a pit bike if I came across a nice one.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6'7" and rode a crf150r big wheel for a few years, it's a great bike.  I replaced my engine oil every other ride and the filter every other oil change.  I cleaned my air filter after every ride and I never had problems with my 08, I had it 5 years.  Just get the suspension done for your weight and you will be fine.  For me it was the ultimate pit bike, I'd take another just for a pit bike if I came across a nice one.

When you say get the suspension done like go somewhere and have it redone? Or just adjust as much as i can? And if you mean take it somewhere do you have any idea on pricing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can start by putting stiffer springs, you would have to talk to a honda dealer to find what spring rate you would need.  If you wanted to go to the next step you would get it revalved.  You could revalve it yourself if you are pretty mechanically inclined and do some research, this is what i'm gonna do on my next bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In short it tunes the damper for different riding conditions by changing the setup of the piston and shim stack that oil flows through to dampen your suspension.  There are plenty of write ups on google that go into detail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×