Mastering Rutted Corners

I need to work on my cornering in rutted turns. Normally I avoid them like plague! Probably one of my worst habits. I always feel like I'm fighting the bike, and I'm going to get cross rutted, feels so awkward. After all they are just small burms with slots in them! Watched some videos but could use some input on how to get more comfortable and not fight the bike so much. What are some good progressive learning techniques?

Good to hear you watched some videos ... Try and take what you learned from the video and practice, practice, practice. Couple of things to think about. At first try working on approaching the rut and a slow speed and exit the rut at a slow speed as well. Try to develop good a 'feel' as you increase your speed a little at a time. Keep you horizon high and look through the corner ... Hope this helps.

I find it best for me to start outside the rut and turn into it. If you try and enter the rut straight on you'll most likely be slightly off line. This will upset the bike and you'll likely end up high-siding or falling over. It's really all about commitment, just like everything else in riding. I wouldn't advise starting out too slow or you'll probably end up stabbing with your foot or "pedaling the bike along" which just upsets the bike leading to you being kicked out of the rut or falling over. Approach at a nice medium speed, look ahead, lean the bike over, and just flow with the rut. Works every time. The real key is to look ahead. Spot the rut entrance before you get to the corner. Spot the apex of the rut as you enter it. Spot the exit as soon as you hit the apex. At this point you're rolling on the throttle and looking down-track for your next obstacle. 

 

Just keep practicing and you'll be loving ruts in no time! I hated them at first too, they were the bane of my existence. Once I realized that it just took some commitment and practice it came naturally. Now I can corner much faster in a rutted turn then a flat one.

Sit in middle of the seat and pull slightly on the bars.leg up and forward as it weighs th bike to the Side better and keeps your leg from catching on other ruts. Try entering slow and being quick out, Then increase entry speed gradually. Alot of people say look ahead but I always follow the rut with my eyes to make sure there is nothing to upset te bike when I'm coming through.

Good input, watched more video to. Going riding tomorrow I'm going to pick a couple turns and focus on this.

Get forward on the bike. As soon as you enter the corner turn your head and spot your exit line. The bike will go where your head/eyes goes. Never look down at the rut. Outside elbow UP! Weight the outside foot peg.

 

Concentrate on that and you won't think about the rut. I have trouble making fast corners without a rut. The bike will normally hook up much better in a rut

 

You can do it in your car to get into the habit (Spotting your exit line). It'll feel weird at first. It's actually the correct way to take a turn in a car anyway and how any race car driver does it.

They also teach you the technique here when you do your P's test (2nd licence test) for a bike.

Edited by AddictedToBling

Good advice here.  Ease in to the rut and accelerate out.  The one thing that gets me thru the smoothest/fastest is once I'm lined up for the entrance I force myself to look to the exit.  It helps me commit better.  If I look where I'm at I try to make corrections and end up bouncing side to side thru the rut. JMHO....

I rode tonight, worked on ruts the whole day/night.

Feels so unnatural to not look at the rut, I find myself looking ahead but not far enough as you guys suggest, then end up looking at the rut right In front of me. I do think it's more distracting when your looking straight down at the rut in front of you. I will try and focus looking way ahead on my next ride. Also need to focus on really getting the bike leaned over to match the angle of the rut face.

I picked a few turns that were not to deep and just tried to get the feel for it and focus on getting comfortable. I gotta say when you do it right it's WAY cool, and how you can launch out of the end of the corner. Looking forward to getting this right, and getting more aggressive with it something I've avoided for way to long.

Thanks for the input guys.

My biggest thing is stay loose and let the bike do its thing. It will want to follow the rut on its own. Its when you try and make the bike stay in that you have trouble.

There's some good answers here but some are opposite of others, like one guy says to sit in the middle of the seat and another says to sit far forward. The main keys to riding ruts are as follows. I call them berms when referring to corners, ruts when in a straight line. 

 

- inside leg needs to be high enough so it doesn't get in the way of learning the bike over. 

- inside knee needs to be locked against the shroud. 

- lean upper body a little toward the inside before entering the berm. Then pull the bike over to the inside as you enter the berm and adjust your upper body as needed in order to maintain lean of the bike and the center of balance. 

- control the rear and/or front brakes until you begin to control the clutch and throttle. 

- In right hand berms the front brake is used longer because you have to put your left foot out early so you can lean the bike over in the berm. 

- look up around the berm not right in front of the bike. 

- Practice, practice, practice. Repetition is the mother of skill. Make sure you're doing the repetition correctly. 

 

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Those are most of the important points of cornering in ruts (berms). If your serious about improving your rutted corning skills get my "Motocross Bermed Corners Techniques DVD or Stream". 

Hey my coaching helped McGrath and Villopoto win multiple AMA National and SX Titles. Now you can learn the same techniques they use. TT members get a 10% discount with this code: TTGSMXS58. 

 

GS and MC 1996 1.jpg

Gary; thanks for your personal help throughout my career. Your methods and strategies made my practice and training time much more effective. (Jeremy McGrath)

 

Gary & Ryan home page.jpg

I'm very excited about training with Gary; I think his training and workout programs have a great deal to offer. When I first met Gary he pointed out the simplest things about my bike set up, once we made those changes there was a huge difference in my riding. He also has helped me with the positive mental thinking side of riding. That has helped enormously!
I think my future will no doubt include
Gary Semics, I think who else would I have train me other than the man that trained McGrath!
Ryan Villopoto #615

My biggest thing is stay loose and let the bike do its thing. It will want to follow the rut on its own. Its when you try and make the bike stay in that you have trouble.

Good point and so true but easer said than done. I will work on that next time.

There's some good answers here but some are opposite of others, like one guy says to sit in the middle of the seat and another says to sit far forward. The main keys to riding ruts are as follows. I call them berms when referring to corners, ruts when in a straight line.

- inside leg needs to be high enough so it doesn't get in the way of learning the bike over.

- inside knee needs to be locked against the shroud.

- lean upper body a little toward the inside before entering the berm. Then pull the bike over to the inside as you enter the berm and adjust your upper body as needed in order to maintain lean of the bike and the center of balance.

- control the rear and/or front brakes until you begin to control the clutch and throttle.

- In right hand berms the front brake is used longer because you have to put your left foot out early so you can lean the bike over in the berm.

- look up around the berm not right in front of the bike.

- Practice, practice, practice. Repetition is the mother of skill. Make sure you're doing the repetition correctly.

Those are most of the important points of cornering in ruts (berms). If your serious about improving your rutted corning skills get my "Motocross Bermed Corners Techniques DVD or Stream".

Hey my coaching helped McGrath and Villopoto win multiple AMA National and SX Titles. Now you can learn the same techniques they use. TT members get a 10% discount with this code: TTGSMXS58.

Gary; thanks for your personal help throughout my career. Your methods and strategies made my practice and training time much more effective. (Jeremy McGrath)

I'm very excited about training with Gary; I think his training and workout programs have a great deal to offer. When I first met Gary he pointed out the simplest things about my bike set up, once we made those changes there was a huge difference in my riding. He also has helped me with the positive mental thinking side of riding. That has helped enormously!

I think my future will no doubt include Gary Semics, I think who else would I have train me other than the man that trained McGrath!Ryan Villopoto #615

Thanks for the input Gary. I do have a few of your DVDs can't remember if I have # 5 I'm going to look.

Edited by Bill_B

The biggest problem i ever had with ruts was staring at it. Lol. I was so worried about cross rutting or coming out of it. Once i forced myself to look ahead it came a lot easier. Felt a lot more natural.

I'm a little rusty on my rutted corners, also.  The tracks I ride don't get too many throughout the day. 

 

I just wanted to throw in there that bike setup can also play a role.  While not as important as technique, if the bike isn't balanced front to rear, or the suspension isn't dialed in, that could kick you out of a rut, too.  And make it difficult to enter one.

Some awesome tips here, cornering is the difference between c rider and a rider obviously. Most c riders do all the jumps the a guys do its what links them together that matters! We all gotta work on it!

Some awesome tips here, cornering is the difference between c rider and a rider obviously. Most c riders do all the jumps the a guys do its what links them together that matters! We all gotta work on it!

 

I can't jump a bike for shit these days :blush: . My balls dropped when I was younger and then retreated later in life. Sometimes I can feel them in my throat. Mental brick wall. Kills me!! 

I had to be fast in the corners. I came 2nd outright in my regional C-Grade 450 class ;) . 42 competitors and I was the oldest at 36. Next oldest was 21.

Hole shotting the first 9 races in a row didn't hurt  :ride: . Only won one Moto for the yr but   :facepalm: .

Edited by AddictedToBling

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Make one of these in the open, and just practice. On my CR144 I enter in with 2nd gear, clutch in. This next part requires confidence. You have to put your leg up, sit up on the bike a little, and lean it. Like a BMX bike. Steady throttle and towards the end, WFO and shift up with clutch.

My knee hits the handle bars. I'm assuming it's because I sit as far forward as possible.. I'm going to try sitting in the middle of the seat

I was watching dean Wilson ride (fast I might add) at lake elsinore mx and I noticed his toe was on the rear brake while going through a pretty deep rut atleast halfway through the rut like he drug it through . I have been told before it helps settle the rear end. I notice that hadn't been mentioned much here.also I see people feathering the clutch through the rut. Can we get some imput on why and when these tequniques should be used???

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