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The Sprocket, To Change or Not To Change?

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We used to carry two extra counter sprockets to each event.  If the track was short or we could not run out a gear in a certain section we went down one tooth.  If the track was long or we ran out of gear in a certain section we went up one tooth.

 

There is never any one sprocket that is best or right.  It depends upon the riding context.  If you never use fifth or sixth gear there is little point in gearing up.  We used a smaller 12-tooth counter sprocket for our two-mile enduro track.  When we rode in fast long open areas we simply started out in second and used first for billy goat trails.

 

Overall gear ratio also depends upon body weight and riding style.  Our two CRF230s are identical but I weigh 150 and my buddy weighs 200.  He runs two extra teeth on the back due to the extra weight he carries.

 

Ideally you want a gear ratio that allows you to top out in a certain gear in a certain section or type of section.  You never want to be caught in between gears as your lap times will suffer.  After I installed Frank Nye's PoweRing and dyno-tuned main jet I was running out of gear on the straights on my track.  I had to go up one tooth on the front so I would use up the gear until the very end of the straights.

 

When it comes to changes and modifications lap times are what counts.  I put an XR250 carb on my CRF230F and it felt faster.  It seemed to pull a lot harder in the middle.  On the two-mile enduro track, however, my lap times increased.

 

Also remember as you increase overall gear ratio spacing between gears becomes larger.  As you decrease overall gear ratio spacing between gears becomes smaller.

 

In general I agree the CRF230F and TT-R230 come with a very low overall gear ratio but if you are not topping out in fifth or sixth it matters little.

Edited by VortecCPI

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We used to carry two extra counter sprockets to each event. If the track was short or we could not run out a gear in a certain section we went down one tooth. If the track was long or we ran out of gear in a certain section we went up one tooth.

There is never any one sprocket that is best or right. It depends upon the riding context. If you never use fifth or sixth gear there is little point in gearing up. We used a smaller 12-tooth counter sprocket for our two-mile enduro track. When we rode in fast long open areas we simply started out in second and used first for billy goat trails.

Overall gear ratio also depends upon body weight and riding style. Our two CRF230s are identical but I weigh 150 and my buddy weighs 200. He runs two extra teeth on the back due to the extra weight he carries.

Ideally you want a gear ratio that allows you to top out in a certain gear in a certain section or type of section. You never want to be caught in between gears as your lap times will suffer. After I installed Frank Nye's PoweRing and dyno-tuned main jet I was running out of gear on the straights on my track. I had to go up one tooth on the front so I would use up the gear until the very end of the straights.

When it comes to changes and modifications lap times are what counts. I put an XR250 carb on my CRF230F and it felt faster. It seemed to pull a lot harder in the middle. On the two-mile enduro track, however, my lap times increased.

Also remember as you increase overall gear ratio spacing between gears becomes larger. As you decrease overall gear ratio spacing between gears becomes smaller.

In general I agree the CRF230F and TT-R230 come with a very low overall gear ratio but if you are not topping out in fifth or sixth it matters little.

I don't race, and Im sure you have much more riding experience then me, so take my response for what it's worth.

I've rode many motorcycles, dirtbikes, and quads throughout my life, and I have a general idea what the low gears are supposed to feel like. When I first had my brand new TTR arrive at my house (prior to ever test driving one), my immediate thought was "What the hell?? Something isn't right here".

1st and second gear were simply useless. By the time I was in 3rd gear, I think I was up to about 8 mph in speed!

Regearing the bike fixed this. My first gear is still pretty 'meh', but my second gear actually allows me to get up some speed now. I still feel that it needs to be geared just a little taller so that that 'meh' feeling for first gear goes away.

The purpose of doing the regearing for the TTR, in my opinion, is primarily to make 1st and 2nd gear more usable. The higher gears on that bike are fine.

Edited by Irishman301
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I don't race, and Im sure you have much more riding experience then me, so take my response for what it's worth.

I've rode many motorcycles, dirtbikes, and quads throughout my life, and I have a general idea what the low gears are supposed to feel like. When I first had my brand new TTR arrive at my house (prior to ever test driving one), my immediate thought was "What the hell?? Something isn't right here".

1st and second gear were simply useless. By the time I was in 3rd gear, I think I was up to about 8 mph in speed!

Regearing the bike fixed this. My first gear is still pretty 'meh', but my second gear actually allows me to get up some speed now. I still feel that it needs to be geared just a little taller so that that 'meh' feeling for first gear goes away.

The purpose of doing the regearing for the TTR, in my opinion, is primarily to make 1st and 2nd gear more usable. The higher gears on that bike are fine.

 

It's all about riding context.  We often ride in rocky areas that require first gear no matter what you do.  My bike has a cam and piston and reverse cone megaphone exhaust and I still need first for some of the insane slow short tight terrain we encounter.

 

It also depends upon what you are used to.  Al my MX-riding buddies used to say the same thing when they jumped on our XRs.  They were used to close-ratio gearboxes with a very tall first gear.  They didn't know what to make of our XRs but they didn't ride where we rode either.  You will never encounter fallen trees and rocks and roots on an MX track!

 

Speed also has everything to do with gearing.  A typical average speed for one of our rides is 10-15 MPH and a typical top speed for one of our rides is 40-45 MPH.  Zero need for tall gearing as the top of fourth is about the best we will ever see and even that is rare.  Nothing is flat, open, and wide.

 

Like I stated above, I agree 100% these bikes are geared very low but I doubt you could ever top out sixth gear even as low as they are.  Now if you find yourself often near the top of sixth gear that is a different story.  Also keep in mind these engines are weak from the factory and the lower overall gear ratio helps.

 

We both went from a 13 to a 12 for our two-mile enduro track but I agree that was ridiculous for most other riding.  I now use a 13 and I find it works great with my modifications but 80% of the riding I do is slow short tight work.  If 80% of the riding I did was fast long open work I would definitely run a 14 or more.

 

We often just take off in second gear and leave first for the crazy stuff.  I had a 1979 four-speed Camaro with deep gears and I only used first for parking lots/ramps and racing.  80% of the time I just took off in second.  First was there when I needed it for race duty and it was mean.

No two bikes are the same and no two riders are the same.  We need to choose gearing that makes us happy.

12.png

13.png

14.png

Edited by VortecCPI

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Ya that makes sense. I guess It really does depend where you ride.

Where I ride locally, I find that I'm mostly using my bike as a dual sport more then an actual dirt bike. I'm on the main roads a lot riding from spot to spot. I'm also on train tracks a lot, which are just long straight always. Also, there are a bunch of wide open fields where I do end up getting into 6th a lot. For my purposes, the taller gearing is definitely way better, as it feels more like a street bike. I can definitely see that for the purposes that you are talking about, the stock gearing would be more favorable.

It never hurts to experiment. That's half the fun!

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Ya that makes sense. I guess It really does depend where you ride.

Where I ride locally, I find that I'm mostly using my bike as a dual sport more then an actual dirt bike. I'm on the main roads a lot riding from spot to spot. I'm also on train tracks a lot, which are just long straight always. Also, there are a bunch of wide open fields where I do end up getting into 6th a lot. For my purposes, the taller gearing is definitely way better, as it feels more like a street bike. I can definitely see that for the purposes that you are talking about, the stock gearing would be more favorable.

It never hurts to experiment. That's half the fun!

 

Oh yes.  If you are finding yourself on fast long on sections in sixth gearing up is a good idea.  No sense having that engine turning like mad when it will pull tall gears with such ease.  The TT-R230 and CRF230 make a bunch of very useful low and mid torque.

 

When I lived in WNY we used to ride countless miles of RR tracks.  That is a great example when we would switch up one more tooth  Also a wise idea to increase fuel economy.  We got stranded just outside of Batavia one time and we had to remove one tank and walk to a gas station.

 

Generally speaking the fastest I have ever had my CRF230 on the trails is the top of fourth at about 45 MPH.  This was on a fast long open section of erosion barrier whoops and I was hauling.  I think I may have had it up to 55 MPH while testing my new exhaust system.

 

Used to love those New England RR tracks!

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Location, location, location.  

I'm gearing the TTR for the desert southwest, where you can hit a trail or gravel road and follow it until you run out of gas, frequently into the next state in any given direction.  Almost like a dual sport, but with little or no actual pavement other than to a gas station, or connecting one trail to another.  

 

Someone mentioned using the YZ graphics for extra HP... what size YZ?  Any particular year?   Pics anyone?   Or preferred vendors?  Ebay links??   

I looked up several, but they all have a vent cut-out in the middle for air flow.  If there's one specific model that will fit better, I'll go with that.

I found this graphics set on ebay that looks like it might fit okay:

s-l500.jpg

 

 

I actually have 2 TTR225's.  One runs, and the other is a quadriplegic charity case that is desperate for TLC and attention, but I got it for $350 with a title.  

I can totally work with that, since it starts with a jump and spray starter fluid, and will even idle (kind of) on really old gas.

 

It needs the clutch plates replaced (got the parts already), fork seals replaced (parts arrived yesterday), new battery (ordered), gas tank shrouds (arrived today), carb cleaned and petcock rebuilt (carb and petcock rebuild parts on the way), needs new bars and grips, and it needs a rear fender.  

 

Both bikes are pretty scruffy, but after I get them where I want them mechanically, it would be nice to add some updated graphics.   You know, for those double-jump photo ops.   :)

 

Here's the needy one.  The other (running) one looks similar as far as shine and sheen.

 

20160108_201255.jpg

Edited by ftl900

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Someone mentioned using the YZ graphics for extra HP... what size YZ? Any particular year? Pics anyone? Or preferred vendors? Ebay links??

I looked up several, but they all have a vent cut-out in the middle for air flow. If there's one specific model that will fit better, I'll go with that.

I found this graphics set on ebay that looks like it might fit okay:

s-l500.jpg

]

Yup if you put YZ250F graphics on it, it gains 7 HP!!!

It's gotta be from an '06 or newer, otherwise the HP gains won't be noticeable :).

Edited by Irishman301

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Update!  So I ended up going with a 14t front and a 50t rear sprocket (the front chain guard piece that stops your chain from braking the case had to be modified to accommodate the larger sprocket) .  It paired with the uncorking and re-jetting brought the bike to life.  It will wheelie 1st and 2nd effortlessly and 3rd gear clutch up, with me the 5'11" 130lbs rider that I am.  The top speed vary s from 100-110 kph (60-70 mph).  As for the non-oring chain, I had to replace it near the end of the season.  Its replacement was the did x-ring chain that I got on sale for 75 Canadian pesos and it seems to be holding up nicely.   

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Wait...you can pull power wheelies in first and second??

I can only clutch it up...I didn't think the TTR had enough power, even uncorked, to power wheelie. Maybe it's because I weigh 190.

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I am wih Irishman on that one?..I did an immediate double-take on the "Easily power-wheelie first & 2nd"

I Love my old girl, & have done any/all power/exhaust mods...& mine would NEVER just power-up the front end, with ONLY a fist-full of throttle & no clutch...not even when she was still 'new' ( by 'new' I mean, with the mods, which I did almost immediately...not as in 'bone-stock-new')

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i have a 2008 ttr 125L. mine has a 50t rear sprocket and a 13t front. Is that normally what comes on them from the factory? If so I'd like to try a 14/46 set-up. opinions?

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