tonybike

Plastic Oil Pump Gear Replacement

86 posts in this topic

That's a nice tutorial. The only thing I'll add is that a penny or similar soft metal between the basket and crank gears makes removing the basket nut a simple job.

Edited by sandlvr69
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That's a nice tutorial. The only thing I'll add is that a penny or similar soft metal between the basket and crank gears makes removing the basket nut a simple job.

 

For some reason the Core 2 Rekluse clutch hub is a real bitch to remove. I needed a puller to get mine out. The penny trick is a really good way to ease clutch basket removal. I'm almost due for another oil pump gear replacement myself. 

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Thanks for the nice comments - glad to hear it might be useful. Now - I would like to add the suggestion about jamming the gears with a penny in the right place - I can't figure out how to edit the post. I did it before, but maybe too much time has elapsed? I am using an ipad.

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Excellent job tonybike!

You deserve a case of beer (or maple syrup?) for your effort.

I've been putting off this job for 50h just because of that clutch basket nut.

I've put your posts in a .pdf file for easier viewing and sharing. I hope you don't mind.

https://www.sendspace.com/file/3cru7m

Cheers.

That PDF thing is very cool. I will definitely use that. I kept a copy for myself. Thanks!

PS - haha maple syrup only if fermented then distilled.

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For some reason the Core 2 Rekluse clutch hub is a real bitch to remove. I needed a puller to get mine out. The penny trick is a really good way to ease clutch basket removal. I'm almost due for another oil pump gear replacement myself.

Chris - I read about that - even saw a picture I think - but I was still worried I might damage something but I know many swear by this method. Sure sounds easier. Does the penny get scarred up or bent? Any ugly sounds? Is it easy to unwind? Thanks for any thoughts on this.

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Chris - I read about that - even saw a picture I think - but I was still worried I might damage something but I know many swear by this method. Sure sounds easier. Does the penny get scarred up or bent? Any ugly sounds? Is it easy to unwind? Thanks for any thoughts on this.

The penny gets destroyed. Just back the basket off though and it falls out. The little block of brass I have made for this job is a little better because it doesn't get sucked in as far as the penny and doesn't seem as crude.

You can see the marks on it from the gear teeth, they are much harder than the brass.

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The penny gets destroyed. Just back the basket off though and it falls out. The little block of brass I have made for this job is a little better because it doesn't get sucked in as far as the penny and doesn't seem as crude.

You can see the marks on it from the gear teeth, they are much harder than the brass.

Thanks, good information. I'll try that next time. That brass block looks like a good idea. I have some old brass fittings.
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tonybike

 

Check out Boano's website I think they now have steel oil pump gears for your bike.

 

http://www.beta.boano.com/ita/foto.asp?prd=1700

 

Is there any reason not to use the metal gears? I don't really understand the choice for plastic gears when their failure could cause serious problems. And, I know some people consider this an "easy" job, but it looks like a major PITA to me.

 

Thanks for the thread, tony.

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http://www.beta.boano.com/ita/foto.asp?prd=1700

 

Is there any reason not to use the metal gears? I don't really understand the choice for plastic gears when their failure could cause serious problems. And, I know some people consider this an "easy" job, but it looks like a major PITA to me.

 

Thanks for the thread, tony.

 

It's actually not that hard at all. It's about a 2-3 hour job taking your time. The hardest part is getting the kickstarter pawl and spring positioned correctly when reassembling. I'm not sure why Beta uses plastic gears. I imagine it's a "fuse" to prevent worse things from happening. Or rotating mass is reduced.

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http://www.beta.boano.com/ita/foto.asp?prd=1700

 

Is there any reason not to use the metal gears? I don't really understand the choice for plastic gears when their failure could cause serious problems. And, I know some people consider this an "easy" job, but it looks like a major PITA to me.

 

Thanks for the thread, tony.

I agree. No compelling engineering reason for plastic and a three hour job for no good reason is not a plus to me.  If I actually ever see a Beta I will probably get weak in the knees but little things keep holding me back. If only I could fondle one of those 390 RR's like Chilly had,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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I agree. No compelling engineering reason for plastic and a three hour job for no good reason is not a plus to me.  If I actually ever see a Beta I will probably get weak in the knees but little things keep holding me back. If only I could fondle one of those 390 RR's like Chilly had,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

Better not buy a Yamaha,Suzuki,Thriump,KTM,Mercury,BRP,BMW,Kawasaki etc and list goes on and on to who runs plastic gears.

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Better not buy a Yamaha,Suzuki,Thriump,KTM,Mercury,BRP,BMW,Kawasaki etc and list goes on and on to who runs plastic gears.

 

I'm quite surprised at how many bikes run plastic gears. Not a big deal at all to me. Just part of maintenance schedule. 

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Do all the other bikes that use plastic gears require replacement as often as Beta specs? I've owned many different brands, and have never heard of any concerns for replacing oil pump gears. Especially after only a few thousand miles.

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At 100 hours I took the major clutch cover off,had a look and took a measurement of the one lower gear and buttened it all back up again. I'll check again in another 40 or so hours.Change your oil often especially if riding in watery  stuff and you'll be ok.

Edited by widebear
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I'm quite surprised at how many bikes run plastic gears. Not a big deal at all to me. Just part of maintenance schedule. 

For a Beta, not normal for the others. Maybe time and evolution of the material will lengthen the interval.

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I'm quite surprised at how many bikes run plastic gears. Not a big deal at all to me. Just part of maintenance schedule. 

I totally agree that it's not a big deal. It's not like they are over priced and it's probably a good ideal to take an occasional peek inside the motor anyways. Perfect time to mic. the clutch to head off any problems down the trail.

 

Do all the other bikes that use plastic gears require replacement as often as Beta specs? I've owned many different brands, and have never heard of any concerns for replacing oil pump gears. Especially after only a few thousand miles.

It depends on it's intended use. The higher strung the motor is, the more it will need to be changed. Road bikes will go much longer then dirt models. The last set of plastic gears I replaced was for a water pump on a snowmobile. It was a 09 MY with just over 30,000 miles on it. No problems, just preventive maintenance for a customer. It's not much different then rebuilding super chargers every 100hrs or two years on jet ski's. Loading and unloading the motor at wide open throttle jumping waves is really hard on the trust washers.  I doubt you will hear much on other bikes unless you've owned one or visit their forums. Other then Catfish posting about catching his I doubt you'll find another that went bad. I don't remember his Hrs but it was like 3-4 times past req. but at the same time I'm not sure there was a service interval on them at the time like there is now. At least the factory stepped up to the plate and recommended a time frame instead of waiting till most owners are out of warranty with a failure and your left holding the bag. Overall it's a pretty dam good bike even with the maintance schedule. At least it's better then a motocross bike. 

Edited by Rotax

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Excellent job tonybike!

You deserve a case of beer (or maple syrup?) for your effort.

 

I've been putting off this job for 50h just because of that clutch basket nut. 

 

 

I've put your posts in a .pdf file for easier viewing and sharing. I hope you don't mind. 

 

https://www.sendspace.com/file/3cru7m

 

 

Cheers.

 

Where did the pdf go? I clicked on the link but it says it's gone. Any way someone could send me a copy?

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I noticed this thread recently and it had me thinking I really need to check my bikes gears. It seems like it is a good idea to replace the gears around the 100 hour mark, which makes sense I guess, just in case the plastic teeth are starting to fail - don't want the oil system failing and destroying the engine. So I ordered the new gears and bushes in advance so I would have them on hand to change when I went in.
696c32e8-e980-4019-b82c-ecae4ac4faa1_zps

Now, the engine manual says to remove the whole right side case cover, but others said it is possible to change the gears just removing the clutch cover and internals. So that is the approach I thought I would try first. I did the obligatory dropping of the oil, and given I have 102 hours on the bike (by the stock speedo, though my aftermarket meter says it is actually 118 hours) it was a good time to empty out the old coolant for replacement.

Having installed the Rekluse myself I was fairly confident with removing it, the hub, and the basket. That exposed the gears underneath the clutch. The 3 plastic oil pump gears are pretty easy to see, and at least 2 of the gears are easily removed with just the clutch removed.
Oil%20pump%20gears%20exposed_zpsxlemthai

Removing the clip was easily enough and the gear slid off without any trouble. I inspected the gear closely and to my untrained eye it still looks to be in pristine condition.
Oil%20pump%20gear%201_zps0rbpf2ay.jpg

Similarly, the second gear was easy to remove and it still looks great.
Oil%20pump%20gear%202_zpsba0b37vt.jpg

I didn't actually remove the third gear because it looked like it might be a little tricky. I did turn it and inspect each tooth and it looks great still.
Oil%20pump%20gear%203_zpsqdemkiyc.jpg

Looking at all the other gears in there everything looks very nice and clean.
Gears%20below%20clutch%20basket_zpsdsi5a

 

After putting the plastic gears back in (I'll keep the new set I bought as I will no doubt need them sometime down the line) I then tried to put the clutch basket back in. I thought I had lined up the gears below properly to slip the basket back on, but it did not seat properly. I removed it several times and tried to slightly change the position of the gears underneath, but I just didn't get them to line up properly so the basket seated properly. With it not seated properly, when you put the clutch hub in there is not enough shaft exposed to put the nut on.
Clutch%20basket%20not%20seating%20proper

After a bit of time and frustration I finally figured out that I could use a small flat blade screwdriver to slowly turn the gears under the basket until the lined up perfectly and the basked dropped. You need to work on the gears at the top left of the case first as they are slightly higher than the plastic oil pump gears. With those aligned you need to do the same to the plastic gears at the bottom right of the case under the basket.
Gears%20to%20align%20under%20clutch%20ba


When the clutch basket seats properly the base is just below the lip of the case as you can see in the image below.
Clutch%20basket%20seated%20properly_zpsx

And with the basket in the hub slots down further and exposes the threads you need to put the nut on. As a matter of interest with the nut, the Beta manual says to torque it to 120Nm but the Rekluse installation instructions say to only torque it to 70Nm... and it warns to not to over-torque it otherwise it might result in the clutch dragging and causing damage. I'm not sure why you need to torque it as high as 120Nm as the washer tabs will prevent the nut from coming undone.
Clutch%20hub%20thread%20exposed%20proper

Putting the rest of the clutch back together was pretty simple, and I can now ride without worrying that the plastic oil pump gears aren't about to fail and lunch the engine.

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