Putting an engine in the frame - XR650L

I thought that it might be helpful to somebody out there to go over my experience putting my XR650L engine in the frame this evening.  It was way easier than I expected it to be - maybe even easier than getting that regulator connector apart. :rant:

 

I want to thank Steve for the good hints on how to do it - that's Steve of Steve's House of Honda XR650L parts, or whatever he's calling it lately. :thumbsup:

 

The first hint was to have it at the same height as where it would be in the frame, right next to the bike.  The second hint was to put the shifter on and hold it by the shifter in my left hand and the right exhaust port in my right hand.  I just kind of stood above it and lifted it over to the frame.  I had put a rag across the bottom frame rails for protection and Steve recommended a piece of cardboard on the front downtube, but I zip-tied a rag there to minimize scratching.  The bottom of the engine was closer to the center while the top was bumping into the frame.

 

I used a large crowbar to work the engine around a bit and get the rear motor mount to line up.  The top had to get under the frame rail before it lined up right, but a little lifting with the crowbar and a little pushing had it fall into place in a few minutes.  I had all of the engine bolts laid out where they would be handy and slid all of the big ones in from the left side.  Lifting up a little with the crowbar had the hole lined up good enough to get the bolt most of the way through, then a little pushing from the other side had it through.  I used a plastic hammer a couple of times to get bolts all the way in.  Note that I had each set of bolts and/or spacers in separate marked ziploc bags so that there would be no confusion at all as to which bold went where.

 

The front motor mount was easy enough to line up, but it has those two metal spacers and the weight of the engine was keeping me from getting the left one (the first one) into place.  I grabbed a big screwdriver, in addition to the crowbar under the engine, and sort of pried the engine to the right until I could slip the spacer in there.  Once the bolt was half-way in, the other spacer was easy to get into place and now I had the two lower motor mounts in place.

 

The other three mounts were all brackets that required virtually no adjustment at all.  I just had to figure out which side should be the outside on each of them.  The brackets at the front that connect to the downtube are marked with L and R to get them in the right place.  Those two bend in about 1-2 mm and have to be put in the right position.  If you can see the R on the right side and the L on the left side it's in there correctly.

 

So now I have all of the bolts and brackets holding the engine in place.  I didn't tighten any of them yet and won't until all of the oil lines are in place.  Who knows if I might have to loosen something before I'm done.

 

My goal is to be riding it by the weekend, but I'm trying to take my time and get everything else done right.

 

I was going to photograph the whole process and ended up not even thinking of the camera until it was all in place.  That wooden thing on the other side of the motorcycle is where the engine was sitting when I moved it to the frame.

 

Once I have all electrical connections in place and all oil lines where they go, the rest will be easy, since I've dealt with all the rest multiple times in the past.

 

If you have other useful hints, please post them here.

 

 

EngineInstall_zpsgtxnsjuv.jpg

Crowbar??? Animal...

Now how is that Pulse Generator wire routed???

Crowbar??? Animal...

Hey, I'm not as strong as you.

 

I haven't started with any of the wiring.  I'm going to have to get the manual out to check routing.  Any hints you can share about the Pulse Generator wire routing?

 

I'm hoping to gather useful hints here that others might find useful.  It would be nice if a knowledgeable person or two could write up what they know. ;)

Pulse Generator cable routing was covered yesterday over on ADV Rider. Here is my post:

 

http://advrider.com/forums/showpost.php?p=26477511

 

XRL thread, page 5514, post #82710

Thanks for the hint.  I'm pretty sure that I would not have run that wire around the front of the downtube.

 

I guess I should start reading that thread.  Are all 83,000 posts worth looking at? :lol:

Not all 83,000. Just the 10.000 or so of my posts...

I got the engine started! :banana:

 

But no oil pressure after 20 seconds. :(:thumbsdn::rant:

 

 

I guess tomorrow I'll go through all of the known tricks to get the oil pump primed.

 

I was sort of surprised at all of the rubber stuff that didn't want to work quite right after sitting for five months.  It was tough to get the carburetor boot on that goes to the air cleaner.  My fuel tank leaked because the rubber seal on the petcock had dried out.  The line from the gas tank to the carburetor was real tough to get into place.  The float needle was letting gas overflow and dump out of the carburetor.  Even the rubber seal on the gas tank cap fell out of the cap.  Oh well.

 

I'm close to having a running bike once again.  I plan to put about 600 miles on it right away, then do an oil and filter change and start using it a lot more than I did last year.

Pull the hose from the top of the valve cover going to the frame resevoir,,crack the lower banjo bolt loose...apply air pressure to that hose and into the oil resevoir while crank the engine over...kill switch on to prevent it from starting.....when oil squirts out the banjo tighten the bolt,,put the hose back on the valve cover,start the bike and recheck oil flow at the banjo when she`s running..........done like dinner..

 

B

Another method I've found that works pretty well is to place a jack with a suitable wooden block on top of it to fit up between the frame rails.  I use a K&L screw jack and a 2x4 block.   Once the jack and block is in place, the engine can be set into the frame and rested on the wooded block.  It can then easily be walked around and into alignment without straining or trying to keep it up off that new powder coat.  The jack can be lowered slowly and the engine eased around as needed to align bolt holes.

Air pressure, at least from my wimpy compressor, wasn't enough.  My next attempt will involve filling the oil filter cavity completely full of oil and putting as much oil as I can in the oil pump, then try air pressure until oil comes out the banjo bolt.

 

I took the spark plug out to go easy on the starter motor, so no concern about it starting.

Since you didn't get oil flow when you started the bike just remove the spark plug and crank the engine until oil shows at the banjo bolt. Sometimes it takes a bit longer for the oil to flow. I won't tell you about the time my XR600 refused to flow oil.

It lives!  Just in time for Easter.

 

I figured that the 20 psi of air pressure from my little compressor wasn't enough, so I bought a relatively low cost compressor with an air tank.  I needed one anyway.  With 120 pounds of pressure my next issue was air going right out the overlow thingy at the back of the engine.  So I pulled the hose off, pushed against it with a finger and an old piece of inner tube, held the air to the line at the top, and had my wife crank it.  Now there is an oil mist all over that section of my garage.

 

I tightened things up and started it again, then loosened the banjo bolt to be sure oil was really flowing and managed to let an ounce or two of nice clean oil out all over my cement floor.  Looks like we have oil pressure.

 

So I put it all back together, realized I didn't have a chain on there, put that on and went for a ride for about two miles.  The engine seems fine.  I'm going to have to clean up my front brakes so they don't squeak so much and might have to take the carburetor apart again because the float needle wasn't shutting off the fuel.  I didn't have any leaks while riding it.  I had that issue when I first bought it, so maybe it just needs a little bit of fuel run through it.

 

I won't trust the bike for at least 100 miles, but it's good to have it back again.  The second gear sure feels different.  It's much better not having that big jump anymore.

 

So I think I'm done here - finally.

:ride:

 

 

B

I thought that it might be helpful to somebody out there to go over my experience putting my XR650L engine in the frame this evening.  It was way easier than I expected it to be - maybe even easier than getting that regulator connector apart. :rant:

 

I want to thank Steve for the good hints on how to do it - that's Steve of Steve's House of Honda XR650L parts, or whatever he's calling it lately. :thumbsup:

 

The first hint was to have it at the same height as where it would be in the frame, right next to the bike.  The second hint was to put the shifter on and hold it by the shifter in my left hand and the right exhaust port in my right hand.  I just kind of stood above it and lifted it over to the frame.  I had put a rag across the bottom frame rails for protection and Steve recommended a piece of cardboard on the front downtube, but I zip-tied a rag there to minimize scratching.  The bottom of the engine was closer to the center while the top was bumping into the frame.

 

I used a large crowbar to work the engine around a bit and get the rear motor mount to line up.  The top had to get under the frame rail before it lined up right, but a little lifting with the crowbar and a little pushing had it fall into place in a few minutes.  I had all of the engine bolts laid out where they would be handy and slid all of the big ones in from the left side.  Lifting up a little with the crowbar had the hole lined up good enough to get the bolt most of the way through, then a little pushing from the other side had it through.  I used a plastic hammer a couple of times to get bolts all the way in.  Note that I had each set of bolts and/or spacers in separate marked ziploc bags so that there would be no confusion at all as to which bold went where.

 

The front motor mount was easy enough to line up, but it has those two metal spacers and the weight of the engine was keeping me from getting the left one (the first one) into place.  I grabbed a big screwdriver, in addition to the crowbar under the engine, and sort of pried the engine to the right until I could slip the spacer in there.  Once the bolt was half-way in, the other spacer was easy to get into place and now I had the two lower motor mounts in place.

 

The other three mounts were all brackets that required virtually no adjustment at all.  I just had to figure out which side should be the outside on each of them.  The brackets at the front that connect to the downtube are marked with L and R to get them in the right place.  Those two bend in about 1-2 mm and have to be put in the right position.  If you can see the R on the right side and the L on the left side it's in there correctly.

 

So now I have all of the bolts and brackets holding the engine in place.  I didn't tighten any of them yet and won't until all of the oil lines are in place.  Who knows if I might have to loosen something before I'm done.

 

My goal is to be riding it by the weekend, but I'm trying to take my time and get everything else done right.

 

I was going to photograph the whole process and ended up not even thinking of the camera until it was all in place.  That wooden thing on the other side of the motorcycle is where the engine was sitting when I moved it to the frame.

 

Once I have all electrical connections in place and all oil lines where they go, the rest will be easy, since I've dealt with all the rest multiple times in the past.

 

If you have other useful hints, please post them here.

 

 

EngineInstall_zpsgtxnsjuv.jpg

Thank you for the info, I'll be doing my 600 soon.

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