Cleaning OEM clutch steels

Im replacing clutch parts with OEM fibers and OEM springs but my steels are straight and I plan to reuse them.  They have some minor browning from slipping in 4th and 5th gear.  Any recommendations for cleaning?  my plan scotch brite and brake cleaner.  thoughts? 

 

The whole story:

Stock clutch was slipping in 4th and 5th after a major engine build, replaced everything (fibers, steels and springs) with Barnett dirt digger parts and somehow fried the whole thing after like ~ 150 miles... See here if interested        http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1130172-clutch-help/

 

Thanks!

Todd

 

That's fine, as long as their still in spec (thickness, flat and not burnt).  A red scotchbrite pad or wet/dry paper on a piece of glass, lapping block or surface plate will work well too.

Your plan sounds good.

Saw the below video a while back (foul mouth and heavy metal alert...to those that have issues with that) when I was going to pull my clutch (decided it didn't need it yet). He uses random orbital sander with high grit (I'm thinking 220 or so would work well).  Seems like he's done this more than once,  and it fixed his slipping issues as you can see at the end. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPdqvaaW_Bs

Im replacing clutch parts with OEM fibers and OEM springs but my steels are straight and I plan to reuse them. They have some minor browning from slipping in 4th and 5th gear. Any recommendations for cleaning? my plan scotch brite and brake cleaner. thoughts?

The whole story:

Stock clutch was slipping in 4th and 5th after a major engine build, replaced everything (fibers, steels and springs) with Barnett dirt digger parts and somehow fried the whole thing after like ~ 150 miles... See here if interested http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1130172-clutch-help/

Thanks!

Todd

Here's the best way that I know of.  Use a stone like this, can buy one at any precision tool store ($10).  If you don't have access to a magnetic tool chuck, lay the plate(s) on a firm rubber mat.

Rub stone over plates in circular motion till they clean up (both sides).  Use the fine side of the stone.

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Edited by Throttle5

Saw the below video a while back (foul mouth and heavy metal alert...to those that have issues with that) when I was going to pull my clutch (decided it didn't need it yet). He uses random orbital sander with high grit (I'm thinking 220 or so would work well).  Seems like he's done this more than once,  and it fixed his slipping issues as you can see at the end. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BPdqvaaW_Bs

Holy Sh!#, that was wild.... not even new friction plates OR OIL.... I would never get away with that.

 

My steel plates have dimples all over them... are they OEM or are the OEM steels flat?

Im replacing clutch parts with OEM fibers and OEM springs but my steels are straight and I plan to reuse them.  They have some minor browning from slipping in 4th and 5th gear.  Any recommendations for cleaning?  my plan scotch brite and brake cleaner.  thoughts? 

 

The whole story:

Stock clutch was slipping in 4th and 5th after a major engine build, replaced everything (fibers, steels and springs) with Barnett dirt digger parts and somehow fried the whole thing after like ~ 150 miles... See here if interested        http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1130172-clutch-help/

 

Thanks!

Todd

 

 

a drz hopped up engine should not fry a good clutch. if the springs are weak, or the cable/puller out of adjustment, yes, it will fry quickly. 

 

 

the clutch lever has to have slack, and the arm needs to be perpendicular to the cable's pull. 

 

as far as the metals, yes, you can refinish them with a swirl pattern to get some grip back. a rougher grain would be better for grip, but don't remove too much metal in the process ;-) 

Pretty sure the OEM have the dimples, at least on the 2001 "S" model we just did. Bike has 10K miles but clutch looked practically brand new (took out to replace oil pump)...bought bike used by pretty damn sure it's the stock clutch and it had the little dimples you describe. 

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