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Wowah these Ultra HD tubes are Heavy!

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I ordered up some Bridgestone ultra HD tubes a assumed they would be heavy.........but holy sheet!

I wonder how noticeable they'll be.

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I ordered up some Bridgestone ultra HD tubes a assumed they would be heavy.........but holy sheet!

I wonder how noticeable they'll be.

 

That's what I have in my bike, and I can't tell, but I have buddies that have complained about them, and that they can tell the difference.  I think that they are easier to feel if you're someone who spends a lot of time picking your front end up as your going over obstacles...

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I used them for years....and years....... And I know not will agree but I'm liken TubLiss

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All I run are Ultra HD tubes and I don't notice the weight difference when riding. While anything can get popped, pinch flats are minimized with them significantly. Only time I've seen or heard of a flat on one is by a nail. Which obviously would pop any tube. 

 

 

Thats why I run BIB`s now :)

 

BIB's are nice if its an off road bike only. They are not rated for street use as they heat up and break apart at speed. So for those of us that ride dual sports, I think UHD tubes are golden. 

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All I run are Ultra HD tubes and I don't notice the weight difference when riding. While anything can get popped, pinch flats are minimized with them significantly. Only time I've seen or heard of a flat on one is by a nail. Which obviously would pop any tube. 

 

 

 

BIB's are nice if its an off road bike only. They are not rated for street use as they heat up and break apart at speed. So for those of us that ride dual sports, I think UHD tubes are golden. 

 

 I believe that if you contact the manufacturers you will find that UHD tubes aren't rated for street use either.

 I've seen tire failures that were attributed to UHD tubes. The engineers say that the tire can't dissipate heat adequately with the thick tube holding heat against the inside surface of the tire.

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I believe that if you contact the manufacturers you will find that UHD tubes aren't rated for street use either.

 I've seen tire failures that were attributed to UHD tubes. The engineers say that the tire can't dissipate heat adequately with the thick tube holding heat against the inside surface of the tire.

On a light weight bike like this , heavy tubes don't have the heat issue, a 500 plus lb bike, is different story.

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I believe that if you contact the manufacturers you will find that UHD tubes aren't rated for street use either.

I've seen tire failures that were attributed to UHD tubes...

Hummmm...

That's what I've had in my bike for 1000's of street miles, and as near as I can tell, it's never been an issue...

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All I run are Ultra HD tubes and I don't notice the weight difference when riding. While anything can get popped, pinch flats are minimized with them significantly. Only time I've seen or heard of a flat on one is by a nail. Which obviously would pop any tube. 

 

 

 

BIB's are nice if its an off road bike only. They are not rated for street use as they heat up and break apart at speed. So for those of us that ride dual sports, I think UHD tubes are golden. 

The guy I bought the 13 450xcw from has run nothing but BIB`s on his dual sport bikes for years. He just balances the wheels. So I dunno know either :)

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On a light weight bike like this , heavy tubes don't have the heat issue, a 500 plus lb bike, is different story.

 

 The instance I'm thinking of, where the separated tire was inspected by the engineers at Michelin, the bike involved was a WR400 or 426 Yamaha ridden on the street with a knobby tire. The tube didn't fail the tire did. The tire was replaced under warranty with directions not to use heavy duty tubes for dual sport applications.

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was it a dot complaint knobbie and at proper road pressures?

I put over 40,000 miles on a drz400 with heavy tubes on the road(the rear), never an issue At all (zilch) at speeds that routinely sought up to 100 mph.

Im sure an issue can be created by factors, but how many engineers at michlelin actually ride dual sports with heavy tubes. Not many Id say.

Edited by Spud786

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was it a dot complaint knobbie and at proper road pressures?

I put over 40,000 miles on a drz400 with heavy tubes on the road(the rear), never an issue At all (zilch) at speeds that routinely sought up to 100 mph.

Im sure an issue can be created by factors, but how many engineers at michlelin actually ride dual sports with heavy tubes. Not many Id say.

 

 It was an off road tire. I don't know what "proper road pressures" are but the tire was inflated within the manufacturers recommended pressure range.

 I wouldn't expect a tire engineer to use a non recommended tire/tube combination.

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Proper road pressures would be in the 20+ psi range with the weight of an offroad bike, for any kind of extended period of time.

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Went for my first ride with the UHD bridgestone's. No flats!....but I can honestly say that I could feel them robbing power out of my 350w. Also noticeably heavier in the front.

I'm gonna try the tubliss route.

I didn't pay 10k for a nice light nimble bike to add 5-6lbs of unsprung rotating weight

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Went for my first ride with the UHD bridgestone's. No flats!....but I can honestly say that I could feel them robbing power out of my 350w. Also noticeably heavier in the front.

I'm gonna try the tubliss route.

I didn't pay 10k for a nice light nimble bike to add 5-6lbs of unsprung rotating weight . The worst kind of weight to add!

They definitely do what there designed for. I might not have noticed the power loss with a 500.

You will notice more than weight with Tublis. You will also be able to run the tires with very little air, which means better traction.

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Proper road pressures would be in the 20+ psi range with the weight of an offroad bike, for any kind of extended period of time.

 

 What benefit do you think you get by running HD tubes at those pressures?

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What benefit do you think you get by running HD tubes at those pressures?

Heavy tubes are just more puncture resistant, longer life and wear a lot less( or more reliable in general), compared to typical oem types on Japanese models or anything comparable , I find the ktm oem tubes are much heavier than Japanese oem, and I consider them a fairly heavy tube for oem, mine are Pirelli brand.

I do have an STi heavy tube for the rear (bought before I actually saw oem ktm tubes) , for when ever I need it. I find the stock ktm front tube is more than heavy enough, I may just get an oem for the front when I need it.

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