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Is there a specific way to do it?

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My bike was recently pulled apart so that the clutch can be fixed, but now that it's together again I need to put coolant in the radiator, the mechanic put water in so that I could ride it home (only 7 kilometers of road riding). This morning I bought some anti-freeze coolant (from Kawasaki) but now I have to drain the water out of the radiator, do I have to bleed the system or something after I put the coolant in? Thanks! 

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My bike was recently pulled apart so that the clutch can be fixed, but now that it's together again I need to put coolant in the radiator, the mechanic put water in so that I could ride it home (only 7 kilometers of road riding). This morning I bought some anti-freeze coolant (from Kawasaki) but now I have to drain the water out of the radiator, do I have to bleed the system or something after I put the coolant in? Thanks! 

 

The rad cap should be the highest point of the system on a dirt bike. I'd drain everything, refill and call it good.

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There's a little 10 or 8 mm screw on one side of the radiator, usually on top on opposite side of the cap. Fill the bike with fluid while the bolt is completely out, and when it starts to come out of the hole, then it's bled

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There's a little 10 or 8 mm screw on one side of the radiator, usually on top on opposite side of the cap. Fill the bike with fluid while the bolt is completely out, and when it starts to come out of the hole, then it's bled

Can't find it on my bike.

The rad cap should be the highest point of the system on a dirt bike. I'd drain everything, refill and call it good.

Ok thanks, I've heard that on some of the KTM's that you need to lift the front wheel 29 inches to get the air out, while on most bikes just shake it so that the air bubbles come out. 

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Can't find it on my bike.

Ok thanks, I've heard that on some of the KTM's that you need to lift the front wheel 29 inches to get the air out, while on most bikes just shake it so that the air bubbles come out. 

 

Maybe on some. But not on mine. I just wobble it around and then run it briefly without the cap. Do it with my Suzuki Sierra (samurai) as well like that.

 

On my street bike I have to bleed it in several places. Do you have the manual for your bike? That would tell you for sure.

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Maybe on some. But not on mine. I just wobble it around and then run it briefly without the cap. Do it with my Suzuki Sierra (samurai) as well like that.

 

On my street bike I have to bleed it in several places. Do you have the manual for your bike? That would tell you for sure.

I have an owners manual:

IMG_30881.JPG

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Does it have this procedure?

Oh, was I supposed to look at my manual? I just drained the bike, but straight petrol in the tank (cuz it had a little pre-mix in already) and revved the snot outta' it. Then I went to the local MX track but the bike seized  :cry:

IT"S ALL YOUR FAULT :foul: 

 

 

 

 

 

LOL!! I'm just joking! :p 

The manual did have a procedure but it was very vague. But everything turned out good, I slowly poured it in, then rocked the bike side to side until no-more bubbles came out, then I started the bike and let it idle for a few mins before putting the cap back on, 30 mins later I went for a 35 min ride and everything's good.

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There's a drain bolt on the side of the cylinder jug on every 2 stroke I have ever seen. Usually a 10mm head with a brass washer underneath. Most of them have another one at the water pump. That's your coolant drains.

 

Refill it, get the engine warm and top it off. There isn't any place for air pockets to form on them so no bleeding required.

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I use one of these for the cars and trucks, I wonder if it would be OK for a bike

CSR201.jpg

http://www.mactools.com/en-us/Battery-and-Radiator/Cooling-System-Pressure-Testers/CSR201/Cooling-System-Refiller

Unnecessary. Fill rads with water from a bucket or hose - don't matter. Don't need high pressure. Remove drain bolt and just let the water run for a few minutes. There's no heater core to flush lol.

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Unnecessary. Fill rads with water from a bucket or hose - don't matter. Don't need high pressure. Remove drain bolt and just let the water run for a few minutes. There's no heater core to flush lol.

 

OK.  I wouldn't know, my bike is air cooled. :smirk:

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