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Memories. You have any?

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2 of my earliest memories of riding motorcycles...besides riding up and down my driveway 1,347,078 times per weekend.

1) My 1st bike. 1982 Honda xr80L, yup a dual sport. Although, by the time I got it there weren't any signals or lights left on it. For that matter, it didnt even have a clutch cable. I paid a hard earned $100+20 for a gold metal flake 3/4 helmet. My twin brother and I cut our 2 wheel teeth on this beauty (eye of the beholder). I was about 9 or 10. Without a clutch cable we just gave it a push and slammed it in gear. It was a trooper.

2) My 1st 2 stroke and the time I "found the powerband". My 2nd bike was a 1986 or 1987 (cant remember exactly) Yz80. I rode it for at least 4 or 5 months, yes months. The one evening I was cruising up my driveway (long gravel uphill) and all of a sudden it surged onto the pipe and really came alive to my surprise. Of course I had to try a few more times to make sure what I had just experienced was real. Btw, ever since that day I have been a die hard 2 smoker. I immediately ran into the house to show my brother my new found experience. Gotta love a smoker.

What kind of old school memories are out there of learning to ride?

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Way too long ago. ;)  All those memories from that time have been purged to make room for new memories.  (At least that is what I tell my wife when she says I have CRS :goofy: )

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Riding a 1976 KV75 at age 4, the bike handled like absolute shit but was super fun. I rode with my dad on the back and tried to do a no hander on flat and ended up in the bushes :lol: He was not too impressed. 

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I was on a Briggs and Stratton mini bike with a touque converter and the neighbor kids with the rich dad were on Honda XL70's.  That was a hard couple years. 1970 and 1971.

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Went to a another friends cabin where my cabin was and he had a friend down that brought 2 pw50's down with him. We rode those things around the bay all weekend in nothing but helmet, shorts and tshirts. I remember taking one corner dragging my foot and losing my shoe around it.

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I got my first two bikes the same day, gifts from a good friends dad. A 1963 Benelli scrambler, seized and missing parts, bottom end rusted solid and a 1948 Vincent Black Shadow. (800 miles on it) with totally split/cracked tires, oil that had not been changed in 30 years and an inch of dust. The deal was I had to get them out of his barn and to my home. No returns. Three miles, slightly up hill. Took all day. My parents were not pleased. There were worried I'd become a Hells Angel. Almost did......

The Benelli, I pulled the engine, welded in part of a mini bike frame and put in a 5hp Tecumseh engine. Bike would do an indicated 50 mph, ripping fast for a 10 year old. I did not get the Vincent started for another 10 years. Terribly scary bike. First 'normal' bike was a 1969 Yamaha AT1

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I got my first two bikes the same day, gifts from a good friends dad. A 1963 Benelli scrambler, seized and missing parts, bottom end rusted solid and a 1948 Vincent Black Shadow. (800 miles on it) with totally split/cracked tires, oil that had not been changed in 30 years and an inch of dust. The deal was I had to get them out of his barn and to my home. No returns. Three miles, slightly up hill. Took all day. My parents were not pleased. There were worried I'd become a Hells Angel. Almost did......

The Benelli, I pulled the engine, welded in part of a mini bike frame and put in a 5hp Tecumseh engine. Bike would do an indicated 50 mph, ripping fast for a 10 year old. I did not get the Vincent started for another 10 years. Terribly scary bike. First 'normal' bike was a 1969 Yamaha AT1

 

And I hope you still have the Vincent.  Those are as cool as it gets in vintage bikes. ;)

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I got my first two bikes the same day, gifts from a good friends dad. A 1963 Benelli scrambler, seized and missing parts, bottom end rusted solid and a 1948 Vincent Black Shadow. (800 miles on it) with totally split/cracked tires, oil that had not been changed in 30 years and an inch of dust. The deal was I had to get them out of his barn and to my home. No returns. Three miles, slightly up hill. Took all day. My parents were not pleased. There were worried I'd become a Hells Angel. Almost did......

The Benelli, I pulled the engine, welded in part of a mini bike frame and put in a 5hp Tecumseh engine. Bike would do an indicated 50 mph, ripping fast for a 10 year old. I did not get the Vincent started for another 10 years. Terribly scary bike. First 'normal' bike was a 1969 Yamaha AT1

No way, I don't believe.  That's a total of 12 miles of walking....................... WITH A BIKE.  

 

*edit*  Wait.  That's actually 9 miles of walking with the bike, and 3 miles of walking to your friend's place without a bike.  Well, unless you got dropped off their by your parents or whatever.  Still, 9 miles of walking WITH A BIKE.  Wait, that's 6 miles with a bike.  What's wrong with me today, hahaha.  STILL though.

Edited by Cute2strokeBoy

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And I hope you still have the Vincent.  Those are as cool as it gets in vintage bikes. ;)

Yup, still have it.

I plated it for just one year (77?), never rode it much. Something was always failing. When it ran, it was a real arm ripper. Only 4S bike I ever rode that had a power curve like a 2S. You'd have to goose the gas, feather clutch to get going and suddenly the revs would shoot to the moon, valves float and you'd shift. It has flat tires once again and the oil has not been changed in probably 20 years. Sitting in my dads barn (much to his chagrin) Seems to be the bikes destiny.

I learned long ago, never get rid of an old bike, even if it is trashed. You will not get much money for it and the $100~$200 dollars compared to memories, there is no comparison. Provided of course, you have a place to store them. I have just four bikes where I am living now. All my other bikes are under sheets in the barn. My siblings and I and near filled the building with our crap.

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What was it Hunter Thompson said about the Vincent, something like if you ride one for very long you WILL die.  Cool bike, was the fastest in the world at the time.

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What was it Hunter Thompson said about the Vincent, something like if you ride one for very long you WILL die.  Cool bike, was the fastest in the world at the time.

When they were made, they were state of the art. In 1948. By the mid 60's, they were old tech. A Norton in proper condition could beat a Vincent easy. A Norton ran better, longer and started somewhat reliably. Never owned a Norton though. Both bikes had sexy engines, just the Vincent was a total slut.

I do have a 1968 Triumph Bonneville in storage. All bastardized with incorrect suspension wheels, pipes, wiring, carbs, drag bars.When a pal of mine redid the engine, he did it so meticulously that it never leaked any oil. I made a new wiring harness and used Yamaha switch gear and ignition coil. I do not recall the brand but a 'pointless transistorized ignition and a battery eliminator. Mikuni carbs. Bike started first kick every time. Road like a tank compared to say a RD350. Not fast, but seemed like it. Very comfortable (seat like a couch) for long rides. Worthless bike except for nostalgia.

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The first bike I rode I was 12 and my dad had his new 86 250-R. I didn't get to ride that again for a while but  my dad got me a 200x. Probably a wise decision on his part. My second bike was a 81ish Honda Elsinore Cr-250R with stereo Fox air shocks. That bike was fun, gobs of top end power.

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Lots of great memories. The best is watching my two boys and daughter learn to ride a 50cc. I have 3 month old boy now and looking foward to showing him the ropes. Everyone has to start eating dirt sometime in their life. With them being so young, they can a bounce back fast and they are fearless. Loving every moment !!!!!

G

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In 1970 I got a 1970 Honda CL-70, which I still have.  I was 13 and in love. We lived in the city on a small 50 by 200 lot. I was to young at the time to get a license, you had to be 14 and I was 13,  so I rode it around the yard. One Saturday I rode that bike 60 miles in that 50 by 200 foot lot. I can only imagine what the neighbors were thinking. Those were the days.

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I remembered yesterdays ride? Past that...cannabis has stolen all the memory sensors...

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My first memory was a Honda 50cc bike that I'd ride around my grandparents' farm and orchard, around the age of 5...?

I got terrified once and forgot how to brake. Lucky for me, the side of a barn stopped me pretty quickly!

 

Next time I'd ride a motorcycle was when my dad bought a street bike and told me I was getting my M endorsement, that I had no choice.

I mean, at 15 years old can you say "no" to something like that?

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lcmx023.jpg

 

Memories........................

hardrock37075.jpg

My Bro and me........... days gone by.

Ride On!

Edited by EarthCruzn
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No way, I don't believe. That's a total of 12 miles of walking....................... WITH A BIKE.

*edit* Wait. That's actually 9 miles of walking with the bike, and 3 miles of walking to your friend's place without a bike. Well, unless you got dropped off their by your parents or whatever. Still, 9 miles of walking WITH A BIKE. Wait, that's 6 miles with a bike. What's wrong with me today, hahaha. STILL though.

I believe it. Back then people walked. Laziness wasn't an option. I pushed my bike 2 miles to the edge of town to ride the country since i had a neighbor call the cops every time i tried to putz out of town. You didnt need a car to go a quarter mile down the road. And im not even that old....
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One of my most vivid dirt bike memories was back in 1990, or 91 my dad and uncle took me for a ride while we were camping remotely at Surrey Lake, which is a remote lake in the mountains outside of Kamloops B.C.

 

I was on my 1984 Honda Z50, and my dad and uncle both had Yamaha IT 250's. I wasnt wearing the best helmet, in fact I'm pretty sure it was not intended for motorized use lol.

Anyways, we were putting along through the woods and came up to an extremely dry logging road and headed up one to find some better riding. We came up to quite a steep hill on this road, and I remember my dad taking off to get a good run at the hill and my uncle followed suit. When my uncle passed me he cut in front of me about 40 feet ahead and I was instantly blinded by dust. Being young, and in a panic.. I pinned it, thinking that they would leave me behind. I remember that poor 50 bouncing off the rev limiter in 3rd (top gear ha!) and not being able to see anything. Turns out I was riding in a clean tire track on this road and as I was blind, scared and just going too fast, I unknowingly veered off of this tire track and the bike disappeared from underneath me. I remember landing face first into the gravel, and skidding quite a distance to a stop. The helmet I was wearing had a button on lower face shield, and a button on visor, which were torn off instantly. I stood up, saw them ride off into the distance and fell back on my ass.. I was hurt, and my bike had slid off the road and down a 20 foot revine. 

 

After a few minutes I saw my uncle racing back down the hill and my dad following suit. I was still in shock, but when my dad took his jersey off and started using it to wipe the blood off of my skinned face I started to panic, but it was when he told me "you have two options son..be a man and get back on that bike and ride it back, or leave it in the bush, admit defeat and walk back to camp to the ladies" I instantly snapped out of my daze, hopped on the bike that my uncle retrieved and rode back.

 

When we got back to camp, I remember my mom flipping on my dad once she saw my face and the other lost skin on my chest and arms. It was kind of funny, a typical reaction from a mother when her only son is visibly hurt. Somehow, it was his fault.

I didnt realize it at the time, but I learned a pretty valuable life lesson from that accident. Every time I think I am defeated, or unable to move on with anything in life, I remember what he told me on that road and it inspires me to move forward, despite the odds not being in my favor.

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