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Washington Tire change

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Any ideas of a cheap place to get tires swapped  ? i am in the Kitsap area but willing to drive if need be . Thanks , Josh . 

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Do you know how to change them yourself or just hate doing it enough to take them to someone else?  If you don't know how, it is a worthwhile skill to learn.  The closest place to me is about 40 minutes and the time involved in driving there and back makes it quicker to change my own and saves me about $30 a tire.  In a couple changes you will pay for the basic tools required.

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i do agree that doing it yourself is beneficial in more than one way . Currently i have little extra time and have no spoons ordered . I was hoping someone had an idea where i could take my wheels and new tires to be installed . Also i fear that Dunlop d606 tires will be a little harder than tires i have installed in the past .  

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i do agree that doing it yourself is beneficial in more than one way . Currently i have little extra time and have no spoons ordered . I was hoping someone had an idea where i could take my wheels and new tires to be installed . Also i fear that Dunlop d606 tires will be a little harder than tires i have installed in the past .

D606 can b a little challenging, but easier if you leave it out in the sun a few hours. I usually go to my nearest cycle gear, their prices are pretty reasonable. Sorry, no clue about service on the penninsula.

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Thanks for the info . I will call cycle gear and see if they are cheaper that the local dealership . Anyone else ? 

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I think Cycle gear charges $40 if you don't buy a tire from them. I want to say Redline cycle off of 6th Ave in Tacoma is only $22. Don't quote me on that though.

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Thanks for the reply . I will call Redline and check on prices . Anyone have the tools to do it at home ? Easy way to make some extra cash if you have the tools . Thanks , Josh . 

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I have a harbor freight tire changer. You can try it if you would like. I've done 4 tires with it so far. It sort of works but you still have to spoon it on the last 3rd. I hate changing tires myself and have no desire to do others but your more them welcome to try.

Send me a pm if you're interested.

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I have Spoons and have changed a ton of them. I'm in tacoma near cycle gear. I would be more then happy to help you change your tire and mount it , how ever instead of paying me to do it i think a better investment would be to buy 2 pairs of spoons from cycle gear and let me guide you through the process :)

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Do you know how to change them yourself or just hate doing it enough to take them to someone else?  If you don't know how, it is a worthwhile skill to learn.  The closest place to me is about 40 minutes and the time involved in driving there and back makes it quicker to change my own and saves me about $30 a tire.  In a couple changes you will pay for the basic tools required.

I think you pretty well pay for the tools on the first tire. I had to buy tire spoons, and that was about it. Soapy water and an empty garage floor rounds out the rest of my equipment.

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I have Spoons and have changed a ton of them. I'm in tacoma near cycle gear. I would be more then happy to help you change your tire and mount it , how ever instead of paying me to do it i think a better investment would be to buy 2 pairs of spoons from cycle gear and let me guide you through the process :)

I am worried that a D606 with the thick sidewall might cause me an issue . What do you think ? 

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I just put a Motoz Hybrid on fri I like to just use the tools I have in my pack find a patch of dirt to do the job. Just for practice. Plus some adult beverages!!

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TRY WILDCAT CYCLE IN KITSAP COUNTY.HE HAS A TIRE MACHINE AND IS LOCATED ABOUT A 1/4 MILE FROM THE WILDCAT LAKE TRAILHEAD AT GREEN MTN. 360-830-5547 HIS TIRE MACHINE WILL NOT MARK UP RIMS IF THAT MATTERS.

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TRY WILDCAT CYCLE IN KITSAP COUNTY.HE HAS A TIRE MACHINE AND IS LOCATED ABOUT A 1/4 MILE FROM THE WILDCAT LAKE TRAILHEAD AT GREEN MTN. 360-830-5547 HIS TIRE MACHINE WILL NOT MARK UP RIMS IF THAT MATTERS.

 

Robin and Wildcat will always have a place in my heart as he rebuilt my first dirtbike, a 1984 XR 80.  It was the beginning of an addiction.  

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Burton motorsports in suquamish.

$20 bucks for a rear tire a few months ago

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I put a 606 on my KLR last summer. A bit challenging but nothing worse than what you would have to attempt out on the trail. Granted the KLR is a 17" rim not an 18". Just the same, no matter who mounts them initially you will have to be equipped to swap a tube in that tire on the trail.

 

3 Spoons. I suggest at least one spoon be the following:

 

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/4482/i/motion-pro-spoon-tire-iron

 

It is a larger spoon that gives a little more leverage to get the tire initially started and finished.

 

Also, highly recommend the bead buddy (makes putting the tire back on much easier).

 

http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/28479/i/motion-pro-bead-buddy-ii-aluminum-tire-tool

 

I hate changing tires too, but force myself to do it, so I know how. This is my favorite YouTube howto:

 

 

Pay attention to the technique of pushing the bead down into the dish of the rim instead of letting it rest on the bead seat. This helps get the tire back on.

 

Later

 

Danny

Edited by dkenck

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Take little bites with your spoons, if it feels really difficult, thats the sign you are spacing too far apart. Take your time and you will get it down easy!

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I've got no allusions of fixing a flat on the trail.  I carry zip-ties and mule tape to keep the tire on the rim to get me back to the truck.  Iprobably do about 6-8 changes a year between three bikes so I invested in one of the $100 tire changing stands for my garage and wouldn't go back.  It gets the rim off the ground and really saves on the back and knees.  It's also handy for tightening spokes, bearing changes, etc.. Plus one on the bead buddy.  I've used it a few times now and it does the job of keeping the tire in the trough pretty well.  After numerous swaps, I've perfected the technique of never changing a tire the same way twice. One thing I can say is that in 3 years of riding nearly every weekend running 10-12 up front and 6-8 in the rear, I've never flatted out. 

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I've perfected the technique of never changing a tire the same way twice.

This is hysterical!! I thought I was the only one... LOL!!!

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