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First race of the season on my 14 yz250f in the 30b.  I only had 3 practice laps to learn the track I've never ridden before.   Its my first 4 stroke and I'm still learning how to ride it I've only ever raced a two stroke.  I crashed int he whoops on the second lap and my wheel/forks were out of alignment.  Any tips or pointers are appreciated thanks guys,

 

 

 

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Keep having fun and try some inside lines on some of those turns.

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Shouldn't have sold your KTM! LOL

Naaa… but yea, 250F's are challenging at first. Ya gotta keep the thing pinned all the time like a 2 stroke. They loose a lot of speed when you get off the throttle. You still have a lot of the same problems you did on the 2 stroke. You sit way too much and your throttle control isn't good. You need to practice finding edge grip somewhere outside of a race, like on a flat area. Just do huge figure 8's or slide the bike around, that will help you learn how much MORE grip the bike has.

I raised the idle on my 4 stroke, so when I got off the throttle, it wouldn't drag the rear to much. Plus, I sometimes use the clutch going into corners to help prevent the rear from locking up AND it keeps me on the clutch for corner exit. It's rare I exit a corner without the clutch, working it just like the pinger.

Anyway, not bad for a first day out on a new bike.

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You're going from a 2 stroke to a 4 stroke so it's gonna take some time to get used to a different power delivery etc. There's a learning curve, and you'll get faster on it every time you ride it. I'm sure you can tell by now you don't get as tired, or have to work as hard on it. Overall I think you look pretty good on it, especially having ridden a 4 stroke so little.

Shouldn't have sold your KTM! LOL

Naaa… but yea, 250F's are challenging at first. Ya gotta keep the thing pinned all the time like a 2 stroke. They loose a lot of speed when you get off the throttle. You still have a lot of the same problems you did on the 2 stroke. You sit way too much and your throttle control isn't good. You need to practice finding edge grip somewhere outside of a race, like on a flat area. Just do huge figure 8's or slide the bike around, that will help you learn how much MORE grip the bike has.

I raised the idle on my 4 stroke, so when I got off the throttle, it wouldn't drag the rear to much. Plus, I sometimes use the clutch going into corners to help prevent the rear from locking up AND it keeps me on the clutch for corner exit. It's rare I exit a corner without the clutch, working it just like the pinger.

Anyway, not bad for a first day out on a new bike.

Are you gonna be at LL's?

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try shifting up a gear on those long straits, it looks like you could pull some more speed out of them if you went up another gear. 

Edited by The_Vernsker
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That track looks fun! I like those split lanes. You were going good. The 2 leaders were hauling, but u kept them in sight.  Not knowing the track I think was part of the problem.  That 1st rhythm section messed you up a little.  I think you could have been more aggressive with the throttle.  Hold it open longer, brake later... the usual stuff.  you were backing off on some of those long sweepers.  I think that goes back to not knowing the track.   So where is that at?

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That track looks fun! I like those split lanes. You were going good. The 2 leaders were hauling, but u kept them in sight.  Not knowing the track I think was part of the problem.  That 1st rhythm section messed you up a little.  I think you could have been more aggressive with the throttle.  Hold it open longer, brake later... the usual stuff.  you were backing off on some of those long sweepers.  I think that goes back to not knowing the track.   So where is that at?

 

Its by Butte, MT.  Ya not knowing the track was a big part of why I was hesitant especially on the downhills and long sweepers.  The track was a blast :)

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Shouldn't have sold your KTM! LOL

Naaa… but yea, 250F's are challenging at first. Ya gotta keep the thing pinned all the time like a 2 stroke. They loose a lot of speed when you get off the throttle. You still have a lot of the same problems you did on the 2 stroke. You sit way too much and your throttle control isn't good. You need to practice finding edge grip somewhere outside of a race, like on a flat area. Just do huge figure 8's or slide the bike around, that will help you learn how much MORE grip the bike has.

I raised the idle on my 4 stroke, so when I got off the throttle, it wouldn't drag the rear to much. Plus, I sometimes use the clutch going into corners to help prevent the rear from locking up AND it keeps me on the clutch for corner exit. It's rare I exit a corner without the clutch, working it just like the pinger.

Anyway, not bad for a first day out on a new bike.

 

I have a rekluse so it reduces the engine braking some.  Not as much as a two stroke but somewhere in-between.  You use the clutch as much as on your 150?  I rarely use it maybe once or twice a lap.  This bike pulls hard from down low, nothing like my 150sx. 

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I think some more laps on that track and you'll be at the front...just looks like you need some more time to get comfortable

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I have a rekluse so it reduces the engine braking some.  Not as much as a two stroke but somewhere in-between.  You use the clutch as much as on your 150?  I rarely use it maybe once or twice a lap.  This bike pulls hard from down low, nothing like my 150sx.

Yea, I don't much care for the rekluse. It's a cool toy, but I think it's very challenging to setup properly because you no longer have control over your engagement point. Plus, when they wear even slightly, they become very sticky. When you get off the throttle and get back on the throttle, they can jerk and engage harshly.

I use the clutch similarly to riding a 2 stroke; on those tight corners where you need exit drive without down shifting. I'm so use to grabbing it on corner entry to help reduce engine breaking, that I generally feather it always when coming out of corners. However, that's just because I don't like engine breaking. I've kicked my idle RPM's up higher and a lot of times, I come into corners with the throttle open because you loose so much speed the moment you get off it.

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Yea, I don't much care for the rekluse. It's a cool toy, but I think it's very challenging to setup properly because you no longer have control over your engagement point. Plus, when they wear even slightly, they become very sticky. When you get off the throttle and get back on the throttle, they can jerk and engage harshly.

I use the clutch similarly to riding a 2 stroke; on those tight corners where you need exit drive without down shifting. I'm so use to grabbing it on corner entry to help reduce engine breaking, that I generally feather it always when coming out of corners. However, that's just because I don't like engine breaking. I've kicked my idle RPM's up higher and a lot of times, I come into corners with the throttle open because you loose so much speed the moment you get off it.

 

Setting up the rekluse was actually a breeze, I had it on my 150sx too.  You can change when the clutch engages/disengages by changing out the springs.  I've never had it stick or act jerky, maybe when your first warming up your bike on a cold day but that happens with any clutch.

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I think you're not used to the engine breaking. You're shutting the throttle and coasting into turns but losing too much momentum in the process.

 

Gary Semics says, accelerate or brake - never coast.

 

Good luck and please accept my criticism in the spirit it was intended.

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