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I have a 2003 cr125 and I'm determined to learn how to ride wheelies I can get my bike up but I can't ride it out I keep falling to the left any tips

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"Falling to the left"?  Are you in California?

 

Try leaning right?

Edited by Still Bill
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Don't even try it if you ain't really familiar with your bike. And to wheelie you better have up shifting mastered too cause usually I start a wheelie in 2nd gear and wwheelie as long as I want when I reach 5th gear (70mph give or take) is my sweet spot. But I've been obsessed with wheelies since I started riding... When you get good you can wheelie around corners and stuff. But if you really wanna impress people then learn how to do a rolling stoppie, cause not many can do that.

But just keep lifting it up and practicing and ALWAYS cover the rear brake pedal incase you go too far because if u tap the rear brake it can save you big time.

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1. (This isn't the right way to ride, but helps in wheeling) stand up, and make a triangle, with your bum back.

2. Be in the middle of the power range, and give gas, while using your body as a lever, pull in the front, squat / sit down in the back. Then give it a tad more gas , getting it up.

Just practice

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Hate to say this, but you have the ability or you don't. After almost 25 years on a bike I still can't get the brake control down and can only keep it up as long as I can power through.

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Hate to say this, but you have the ability or you don't. After almost 25 years I can only keep it up as long as I can power through.

 

thats-what-she-said-funny-memes-7.jpg

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Clutch it up, catch it with the rear brake and ride the wheelie. It's easiest to steer behind balance point. Stop being a bitch.

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Clutch it up, catch it with the rear brake and ride the wheelie. It's easiest to steer behind balance point. Stop being a bitch.

Everyone I have ever seen learning by dumping the clutch just eats cables non stop. I know getting the bike up by rolling on the throttle as you shift your weight isn't the easiest way to learn, but it is the right way. Learning using throttle control and weight shifting will help with crossing obstacles on the trail, dumping the clutch won't unless a rider has already mastered balance skills, which most new riders asking the wheelie question don't have.

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You need to dump the 125 and get a 450 you wont have a problem getting the front wheel up

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Everyone I have ever seen learning by dumping the clutch just eats cables non stop. I know getting the bike up by rolling on the throttle as you shift your weight isn't the easiest way to learn, but it is the right way. Learning using throttle control and weight shifting will help with crossing obstacles on the trail, dumping the clutch won't unless a rider has already mastered balance skills, which most new riders asking the wheelie question don't have.

It's not dumping the clutch. Slipping it is no more damaging to the bike than a quick start. Clutching it up is more predictable and precise; allowing the rider to put the front wheel at the height they want, in the gear they want, without an increase of speed. Lifting the front without increasing speed is much more useful on the trail, especially for bigger steps, logs etc where hitting the obstacle with the front about 1/3 up the face will use the suspension to help bounce up and over, or splatting undercut steps. Drop offs, obstacles with tight turns after, floater turns for obstacles halfway or immediately after a corner; successive obstacles, are all situations where clutching offers far more control and consistency, especially in slippery conditions, making it safer/easier/faster.

 

Same clutch technique used for different applications such as hopping ditches or deep ruts on the trail, approaching a hill in a taller gear out of a corner, and avoiding downshifting on long climbs.

 

On the mx track it's useful for lofting the front over smaller jumps and humps to minimize airtime; and carrying a taller gear and lofting the front into whoops sections. On a CR125 OP should be slipping the clutch out of a lot of corners to keep it on the pipe.

 

Aside from being more consistent and good practice for the above uses, a rider who doesn't use the brake and loops will likely feel better and save money by doing it slowly in a low gear, rather than having the throttle pinned trying to chase a wheelie. Balance comes with practice, and practicing the right way means faster progress. Thousands of wheelies on my yz and 636, and neither have used more parts than anyone else I know.

 

No offence, but someone who chases wheelies and doesn't have brake control after 25 years probably shouldn't be telling others the 'right way' to learn.

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Can you guys give me some tips on how to wheelie

Jake, Here's an article I did a few years ago on...

(The Art of the Wheelie)

 

 

There’s no doubt about it wheelies are cool; they’ve always been cool.  Not only are they cool but they also have benefits in motocross racing which we’ll see later in this riding tip.  Just about anyone can master the wheelie if they understand the correct techniques and get a lot of consistence and frequent practice in.  Of course the key to mastering the wheelie is balance.  There is front to back balance and side to side balance.  The front to back balance is controlled with body movement and the throttle and rear brake, even the clutch at first in order to get it up, the front wheel that is.  Once you have it up (in the balance point range, more on this later) it’s a matter of keeping it there and keeping it straight. 

 

Techniques for keeping it in the balance range (the balance point). 

 

What exactly is the balance range and point?  The balance range is the range relating to the angle of the height of the front wheel.  If the angle goes too high (the front wheel gets too high) the M/C will go over backwards.  This is why you have to be able to control the rear brake.  If the angle of the M/C is too low it will fall back down and out of the balance range.  The latter is where you would have to lean back and give it more throttle.  The balance point is where you and the M/C are at the perfect angle in the balance range.  This is where the M/C doesn’t try to go back anymore or forward anymore.  You don’t have to slow down with the rear brake in order to lower the front or you don’t have to pick up speed in order to raise the front.  You are in the wheelie’s perfect balance point.    Of course this is much easier to accomplish on smooth ground (such as pavement) but when the ground in uneven it takes an uncanny amount of balance and control with your body movements and throttle and rear brake. 

 

 

Doug Demokus who in my opinion was the original one and only Wheelie King was the grand master of rear brake control in order to keep from going over backwards.  During most of the 70s Doug was hired by the National and Supercross Promoters to attempt to wheelie around the entire motocross or supercross track without letting the front wheel come down.  He actually did this several times.  Some riders thought Doug had a special wheelie bike that made this a lot easier.  Although Doug did have a bike set up for him doing wheelies it was no easier to do a wheelie on as many of us found out after attempting wheelies on his bike.  The doubters were soon silenced.  And besides, what professional doesn’t have a special bike set up just for them? 

 

Doug and I were both riding for Kawasaki back in the mid 70s, Doug as the Wheelie King and myself as a motocross and supercross racer.  One afternoon some of the mechanics and I were taking a little lunch break in the parking lot just outside the mechanics shop.  Doug hopped on a stock KX 250 in his regular street clothes (tennis shoes, T-shirt and no helmet).  He started doing wheelies across the relatively empty parking lot.  He was doing a bunch of cool tricks but the one that amazed me most and that I’ll always remember was this one.  I guess you’d call it a bump start wheelie.  He went across the parking lot in fifth gear, pulled in the clutch and pushed the kill button, he processed to coast there at the perfect balance point for about 20 yards, pulled back a little on the bars as he let the clutch back out to restart the engine and continued on a perfect wheelie.  All of us standing there were awe struck as we tried to pick our jaws up off the pavement.  This was nothing for Doug, just a little lunch time entertainment.  The late Doug Domokus who died in an Altra-lite crash at Lake Ellsinore around 2000 was the true Wheelie King.  Doug did write a book titled “The Wheelie King”. 

 

Whether you want to follow Doug’s footsteps, do wheelies for fun or master wheelies in order to benefit your motocross skills you’ll have to understand the proper techniques, be able to do them correctly and do them correctly repeatedly over a period of time that allows you to program it all into your automatic reflex reactions, here’s how. 

 

Now let’s get a good understanding of the nuts and bolts and all the proper techniques.  It helps to have a smooth engine, you don’t want a pipey power band that kicks in and loops you out.  Another thing is a relatively short swingarm.  The longer the swingarm the narrower that balance range will be.  Another thing to remember is that it’s easier to do wheelies on an up hill rather that flat ground or especially downhill.  An uphill keeps you from picking up too much speed and it also makes the balance range wider. 

 

Getting the front end too high and not controlling the rear brake is the worst thing that can happen.  This mistake will cause you to go over backwards (loop out).  Since nobody wants to do that they end up not getting the front end high enough, they are too low in the wheelie range and have to do a power wheelie in order to try and keep it up.  This is known as a power wheelie since the power is what’s keeping it up.  Soon you will run out of power and speed.  This is why doing wheelies on up hills is much easier.  So you see to master the art of wheelies you can’t be afraid to get it way up there in the balance range and then you will find the balance point.  You won’t be afraid of this if you have control and confidence in the rear brake.  The rear brake is your savor from looping out.  Make sure your brake is adjusted up high enough so it’s easy to reach. 

 

Starting the wheelie

 

When you want to start the wheelie sit about half way back on the seat use second or third gear from a relatively slow speed for that gear.  You want to be in the bottom of the power range so the engine has a long way to make power before it revs out.  Pop the clutch out and pull back on the handlebars hard enough to bring the front end up into the balance range.   This next clip will show you how to start the wheelie.  I’m using 3rd gear on my RM 250. 

 

Once you have it up

 

Now that you have it up in the balance range it’s all a matter of body movement and throttle control.  The throttle control is most important. Unless you are really, really good at wheelies you are going to be doing a power wheelie to some degree.  This means you will continue to pick up speed as you go along.  The less speed you pick up the better but that is easier said than done.  As you pick up speed your going to have to shift to the next gear if you want to continue to awe the by standers with your wheelie skills.  Make sure you shift at the right time and make it a very smooth shift; nip the clutch as you upshift.  How do you know the right time to shift?  You have to feel when the angle is right.  The correct angle is about a quarter of the way to the front of the balance range.  When you make that beautiful upshift that allows the front end to continue to fly you’re going to pick up more speed.  So you don’t want the front to be too high, if it was you wouldn’t need to upshift and pick up more speed.  And of course you don’t want the front to be too low or you will loose the wheelie.    As that gear runs out upshift to the next and so on until you’re in 5th looking for 6th and the fat lady is standing and singing. 

 

Standing Wheelies

 

Standing wheelies are very similar in technique as sitting wheelies.  The major difference is that the only thing keeping you on the bike is pulling back on the bars and of course the footpegs.  When you do a sitting wheelie you have the handlebars, footpegs and seat.  I would say the degree of difficulty is about the same. 

 

Keeping the M/C straight (side to side balance)

 

Besides getting the front in the balance range and ultimately the sweet spot balance point there is also keeping that sucker straight.   There are basically three things you have control of in order to accomplish this, 1 side to side movement with your upper body 2 turning the handlebars and 3 moving your knees and sometimes even your feet out to the side for extra balance.  These movements have to be subtle, smooth and fast.  You have to maintain that center of balance because once it gets too far off it’s too late to bring it back.  Of course, if you want to turn while you’re doing a wheelie you just lean it the way you want to turn but you still will be using the 3 control methods just mentioned.   An interesting and very helpful effect relating to turning the handlebars is the gyro effect of the front wheel.  The faster the front wheel is spinning the more of this beneficial gyro effect you will feel.  This is so important that Doug Domokus had a special very small battery operated motor on his wheelie bike that would continue to spin the front wheel for those ultra long wheelies Doug did.  Doug has the Gneiss Book World Record Wheelie.  I think its 144 miles.  He did it around the parking lot of one of the Supercross Stadiums.  I remember him telling me he finally had to stop because he was getting board and his arms were getting so tired. 

 

Learn how to use that rear brake right from the get go.  It’s an important, healthy point to remember.  Make sure you have your foot already on it as you begin to bring the front end up.  You don’t want to go over backwards now do you?  I know I’ve done it several time in my days.  Although it ain’t as bad as going over the bars it’s still not a positive experience.  

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On 6/29/2015 at 5:29 AM, Gary Semics said:

 

 pulled in the clutch and pushed the kill button, he processed to coast there at the perfect balance point for about 20 yards, pulled back a little on the bars as he let the clutch back out to restart the engine and continued on a perfect wheelie.   

 

Never thought of bump starting a coaster. Only done it with electric start on my 636. Not sure how it'll work with a slipper clutch though? Gary, why don't dirt bikes have slipper clutches?

 

 

Couple of things to add (not sure what OP rides, most of my wheelies have been on 4t's - dirt bikes, trials, sportsbikes - or torquey 2t's - trials, 250+'s):

 

  • Find an even surface with lots of grip.
  • Wheelies are easier to steer behind balance point.
  • Try not to tense up; keep your upper body loose.
  • Be smooth with the throttle; chopping it is a big reason why a wheelie will start to go side-to side wobble.
  • If it starts wobbling side-to-side, lower the front wheel and then bring it back up after it's stable.
  • When setting a wheelie down, roll on a little bit of throttle so it doesn't slam down hard. If your front wheel isn't straight it's less likely to throw you this way.
  • Never bail; most wheelies can be saved with some rear-brake.
  • If it all goes to shit, set it down. You can always do another wheelie.

 

 

If you're doing wheelies just for wheelies sake I suggest making 1st gear idle wheelies your goal. Once you have the balance and brake control for that then scraping, coasters, speeding up, slowing down, changing gear all comes pretty easily. Once brake control is a natural reaction (see below) to saving a wheelie from looping, an option is to turn the idle up a little bit; it will make slow wheelies a bit smoother and (depending on bike/idle speed) make idle wheelies possible.

 

On a dirt bike I think the best way to learn is to come to a stop with left foot down and right on the brake. Clutch it up smooth, just like you're riding away from a standstill but with a bit more throttle and a little faster clutch (don't just dump it) while giving a slight tug to the bars and it should come up fine. Pulling on the bars is more like a bounce of the suspension. If I'm doing slow wheelies I'll often use the brake to load the suspension then clutch and pull as it comes up on the rebound. Pulling up really hard can tend to make the bike lean one way or the other. Learn to catch it with the rear brake and drag your left foot to the side to help with side-to-side balance. Once you kind of get the hang of it pick your foot up so it doesn't become a bad habit. I learned to do sit-down-circle-wheelies on my dirt-bike by doing &%$#@!-drags and it's a bastard of a habit to break.

 

 

 

 

On 6/29/2015 at 5:29 AM, Gary Semics said:

This mistake will cause you to go over backwards (loop out).  Since nobody wants to do that they end up not getting the front end high enough, they are too low in the wheelie range and have to do a power wheelie in order to try and keep it up.  This is known as a power wheelie since the power is what’s keeping it up 

 

Most of the wheelie crashes I see are because of power wheelies. Not the ones just below bp, but one or two foot high fly-bys with the throttle pegged; when the engine hits the fat part of the power it flips them really quickly. Or they chop-chop the throttle, then chop it in the meaty power and same thing happens.

 

Perfect (sportsbike) example

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHXBu4IO_qQ

Power wheelie, chops throttle (around 5 seconds), pins it to keep the wheelie going, then when it hits the sweet spot and drives him into the pavement.

 

 

On 6/29/2015 at 5:29 AM, Gary Semics said:

Learn how to use that rear brake right from the get go.   

 

We all know that the best way to learn anything is intentional practice.

 

For me, I simply clutched it up and then used the brake to bring the wheelie down immediately. I did this repeatedly, getting higher and higher, deliberately past bp and intentionally using the rear brake to bring it down without closing the throttle. Don't worry if you (not you Gary lol) stamp on it too hard, with lots more practice you'll learn how much pressure is needed. Didn't loop a wheelie until I started slowing down seat-standers (after learning to scrape, idle, etc). Need to drill it in so it's natural instinct. So many people get it too high and then throw their legs out the back and eat shit :facepalm:

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