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Plastic vs metal skid plate

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I just bought a 2002 cr250 in pretty nice shape. I do mainly off-road and a little mx riding. I've never used a skid plate on any of my previous bikes few of my friends do and we have never had an issue. But I figure I should get a skid plate. I'm a little tight on money and want to know if a metal skid plate is really nessisary or if a plastic one will be fine. Thanks in advance for your help.

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 I race GNCC and with the metal skid plate my mind is much more at ease when riding over a log or something like that. I have no mechanical issues with a metal skid plate on my crf250r and my father does not have any problems with a metal skid plate on his 2005 yz 250. If I were you I would go with the metal for peace of mind. Think about it, "plastic skid plate!"

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I have both. The aluminum one I have on my 200 fits much better and offers more pertection. The plastic one is on my 125 and it's a TM designs. It cost more that the aluminum and in my opinion is a piece of @#*%. I was very hard to mount, poor fit and will flex into the side cases .

Buy a good aluminum one that's just my opinion.

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I race GNCC and with the metal skid plate my mind is much more at ease when riding over a log or something like that. I have no mechanical issues with a metal skid plate on my crf250r and my father does not have any problems with a metal skid plate on his 2005 yz 250. If I were you I would go with the metal for peace of mind. Think about it, "plastic skid plate!"

Do you have a poly skid plate? If not, you really don't have a clue. The poly plate I have on my KTM is far superior to the aluminum plates that I have had on other bikes. In fact its made out of the same poly that whitewater kayaks are made of and you know what they don't even make aluminum kayaks. What do you think hits more rocks a kayak or dirt bike?

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Do you have a poly skid plate? If not, you really don't have a clue. The poly plate I have on my KTM is far superior to the aluminum plates that I have had on other bikes. In fact its made out of the same poly that whitewater kayaks are made of and you know what they don't even make aluminum kayaks. What do you think hits more rocks a kayak or dirt bike?

While I agree that a poly plate is more than adequate your kayak argument is silly. A kayak hitting rocks has the luxury of being able to deform without the worry of pushing into fragile aluminum or magnesium parts. At best it pushes into airspace, at worst it bumps a part of your body which has soft flesh to absorb it.

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My family owns several factories that make polyethylene kayaks and we have done some pretty rigorous testing. There's not much you can do to "brake" polyethylene. It scratches and gouges a little, but is nearly impossible to puncture or snap or actually dent under any conditions a kayak or even a bike may face. Just for shits and giggles I have even shot one of the kayaks with a few small caliber rifles from about 30 yards without successfully puncturing them. This is partially due to the flex and partially due to the way the boats are made in stages and layers dispersing the energy in a similar manner to a Kevlar vest.

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I have a plastic one, its the KTM powerparts one. It is plenty strong for me, I'm just looking out for the occasional large rocks. Smack your frame on a few and it puts the fear in you. You don't need a skid plate for logs.

Mine is also quick release with no tools. Every time I wash the bike I remove it. Mud collects in skidplates so get a quick release. If I had to use tools every time to remove for washing, I wouldn't use one at all because that would be a pain in the butt. This plastic one is beefy, its not like fender plastic its very rigid. More protection than I need.

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My family owns several factories that make polyethylene kayaks and we have done some pretty rigorous testing. There's not much you can do to "brake" polyethylene. It scratches and gouges a little, but is nearly impossible to puncture or snap or actually dent under any conditions a kayak or even a bike may face. Just for shits and giggles I have even shot one of the kayaks with a few small caliber rifles from about 30 yards without successfully puncturing them. This is partially due to the flex and partially due to the way the boats are made in stages and layers dispersing the energy in a similar manner to a Kevlar vest.

I doubt your data Spencer. I would be willing, in the interest of science and truth, to put one of your families kayaks through a series of rigorous tests to prove their trustworthiness. Being an impartial third party I think my report will be more convincing. Just pack up one that can carry me and my fishing gear, er, I mean scientific gear, and send it my way. I'm willing to do this in order to save lives, so you should probably rush ship it. ;)

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I doubt your data Spencer. I would be willing, in the interest of science and truth, to put one of your families kayaks through a series of rigorous tests to prove their trustworthiness. Being an impartial third party I think my report will be more convincing. Just pack up one that can carry me and my fishing gear, er, I mean scientific gear, and send it my way. I'm willing to do this in order to save lives, so you should probably rush ship it. ;)

Lol, um no... However, many retailers of Paluski boats offer free test days where you are more than welcome to abuse them at someone else's expense. Besides, I don't work for my dad and even I need to pay for mine.

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My WR450 came with a plastic skid plate. I bought a metal one, installed it, rode it for a while and hated the sound that reverberated back. It sounded like the motor had gravel in it. I changed back to the plastic one and cracked it next ride. I deal with the sound now.

Just think if that magic rock hits something just right. Do you have the cash not to have a skid plate?

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I have had plastic skid plates on my last 8 or so bikes. I spend probably 80% of my time riding rocky single track and have never had a problem with the plastic skid plates. I have had frames crack and dent with metal but not plastic. The plastic seems to absorb more of the impact whereas the metal transfers the impact to the frame. Either way you go you will protect the engine.

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IMO really depends on where and how you ride.

 

On my CRF250R I had an acerbis plastic plate which was easy to take and offered reasonable protection. I did like this but...

 

My buddy has a CFR250X with the same plate and hit a large rock cracking his water pump case and we had to spend hours getting his bike out of the bush.

 

I'm now running an aluminum plate and use HD foam on the frame to prevent vibration. i do not notice it effects the flex of the frame.

 

This is me on a friends drz400 riding some of the exposed terrain I ride and hence an aluminum plate

 

160_zps3a1755ab.jpg

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Never bought a aftermarket skid plate, but if I were to buy any grunt that's job was protecting something else, id Almost always pick the metal.

Save up and do it right the first time,

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There are different levels of quality in a skidplate whether it's plastic or aluminum. 

I bought the Moose Pro plastic plate for my 2006 CRF250R and at $170 it was considerably more expensive than an aluminum plate. I wanted light weight, frame flex and the ability to slide over rocks rather than digging in the way aluminum does. It worked very, very well. I smacked rocks hard, every ride for three years with that bike, probably over a hundred hours of sustained abuse and it held up great. It spread out the impacts and then slid like grease. Never punctured, never cracked.

And no damage at all to the frame rails underneath.

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Lol, um no... However, many retailers of Paluski boats offer free test days where you are more than welcome to abuse them at someone else's expense. Besides, I don't work for my dad and even I need to pay for mine.

Well, it was worth a shot.

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There are different levels of quality in a skidplate whether it's plastic or aluminum. 

I bought the Moose Pro plastic plate for my 2006 CRF250R and at $170 it was considerably more expensive than an aluminum plate. I wanted light weight, frame flex and the ability to slide over rocks rather than digging in the way aluminum does. It worked very, very well. I smacked rocks hard, every ride for three years with that bike, probably over a hundred hours of sustained abuse and it held up great. It spread out the impacts and then slid like grease. Never punctured, never cracked.

And no damage at all to the frame rails underneath.

Not sure why I've never seen the Moose Pro plate but from the pics I just look at, it offers good protection for what on my bike are the exposed water pump/oil filter. If I went back to plastic I'd take a serious look at it.

 

I believe this is a pic comparing aluminum to the Moose unit for a wr250x

 

WR250R-WR250X-Moose-Skidplate-vs-Flatlan

Edited by filterx
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OK, I'm with the "poly" skids. BUT, they are NOT made for every bike, so if you can't get one for your bike, get an aluminum one. The plastic skids are garbage. I have one for my bike, it's "supposed" to fit better than an aluminum one...yeah right...supposed to protect just as well and be easy to remove...yeah right...PITA is what it is, nothing more.

IF you go with aluminum, use a soft material like skid plate foam or the foam strips for putting a camper on the bed of a truck, to silence the noise. OR, I have used both a wide full protection skid and "Works" style skid and I really like the works skid. It sits more "in between" the frame rails than under (or on) them and is quiet, protects the cases, doesn't hang up on much of anything. Since you are talking about a CR and not a CRF, the works plate would be a good option for you.

I did make a  skid for my son's bike using a cutting board and the works design. It works great, but I can definitely see where he has gouged it going over rocks.

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