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Body Position - Gender and size influence?

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I am a female novice rider.  I bought an X-trainer earlier in the year and am still trying to figure everything out.  One of the key points I have read is body position.  There is a lot of information on the topic but I wonder if gender and size of rider might influence things as well.  Females typically have a lower centre of gravity then males and I am on the shorter end of the scale in terms of height (5'3").  I have been having issues with not enough traction going up hill and deflection.  

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For going uphill I generally move my butt back a bit and lean forward, try to distribute weight on both ends.  But then again, I'm 6' and 205 lbs.

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up hill, nuts to the tank and let it rip, letting the rear wheel and motor do all the work.  thats what i was taught when i started and its held true.  but now mid 20's 6'4" and 240lbs i can lean back a bit and flog it up!

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up hill, nuts to the tank and let it rip, letting the rear wheel and motor do all the work.  thats what i was taught when i started and its held true.  but now mid 20's 6'4" and 240lbs i can lean back a bit and flog it up!

 

The OP can forget the nuts to the tank part. :lol:   And this is a good example of what works for some won't work for others, a lot depends on weight, at your weight the bike is stuck to the ground pretty good, no matter where you sit.. ;)

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The OP can forget the nuts to the tank part. :lol:   And this is a good example of what works for some won't work for others, a lot depends on weight, at your weight the bike is stuck to the ground pretty good, no matter where you sit.. ;)

ahaha yea! but same principle for the ladies, thrust hips pelvis to the tank and lean forward slightly and give it alot of thottle, thats what i did when i first started riding when i was 10 or so and it just kinda held true thru the years< at least for me.  

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X-trainer looks like a very nice bike and I'm in the market for a Beta 300rr

 

Have you gotten the suspension set-up correctly? since IMO this is pretty much the first thing you need to do. You may need to go with a softer rear spring to get both rear sags set correctly. Once you get the rear sag set correctly you can then adjust and document clicker settings but just make one change at a time.

 

Then ride with better/patient riders and watch how what they do. You need to be patient yourself and it looks like you've narrowed down areas you need to focus on.

 

I watched OZ-DRZ whole video series from the beginning and I've methodically work on different area's of my riding skill's  and IMO have helped me improve immensely. http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/1077985-cross-training-enduro-dirt-bike-techniques-vids-tutorials/

 

When I was really into skiing/snowboarding, there where lots of GOOD girl skiers and their lower of center of gravity was important so I will assume getting your suspension set-up correctly is key

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I don't generally sit on my bike. I stand so the only thing hugging the tank will be my knees. I haven't set rear sag but will be doing that. Going to hold off on clickers until I get more comfy. I hear Beta is great right out of the box. Read some stuff about position and I am thinking a dead lift pose is what I will want. Feet pivoting on pegs, knees crushing the tank, ass out a bit and core tight. Avoid death grip and keep arms slightly loose.

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Going up hills is one of the best times to sit I think. Hills are tough because there is very little if any weight on the front wheel and it will deflect easier because there's just no reason not to. You have to steer more with the pegs. Standing up hills makes the front end even lighter and puts alot of strain on your arms, in a long ride or race that adds up fast. I'd suggest not researching so much, everyone is so different, maybe pick up a few things to try and go see what works best, feel it out. I'm no pro but that is my philosophy.

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Yep stand as much as possible but this come with time but with that said know when you can sit to conserve engergy.

 

Regardless of sex, this is a super hard thing to give advice. If you have a chance to take a dirt bike school/clinic do it

 

Get your suspension and specifically both rear sags set ASAP. Not hard but a 2 person job and you can find good vid's.

 

Did you get your bike at a local shop?

Edited by filterx

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Never admit your a female on the interwebs.

On a more helpful note, if you have started looking into suspension, you may also want to look into tires for your local riding conditions.

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Tires are golden tyre and seem pretty good. Yeah need to do the sag. Thinking of doing a harescrambler on Saturday. I am old hag so really no worries from the trolls.

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With body position, the number one thing is to be driven both forward and upward through your pegs. Your legs are much stronger then your arms, and resisting acceleration and gravity forces with your legs rather then your hands results in less fatigue. As for your specific problem, the first thing i would check is tire pressure. With hill climbs it usually isn't a traction or body position problem, it's a momentum problem.

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+1 on momentum.

 

Trials riding is all about a neutral position on the bike so your hands don't need to support your body weight, also less tiring on the forearms. So any time you need to grip the bars to stay in position on the bike your were and are in the wrong position. A line thru the center of gravity for you body and the foot pegs should always be vertical to the earth except when the bike is accelerating or braking. So if I do a standing start for a hill climb I lean forward so my legs absorb the acceleration rather than my arms. I then maintain a neutral position while climbing, the exception is my XR with a Trials tire that has so much traction that I often need to move further forward to keep the front wheel down enough for steering control.

 

If someone can video you during practice I think you will see what works and doesn't work.  When it feels easy you'll know it is correct.

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I'm also with the momentum, also years (and I mean years lol) ago I was taught to pick your line for going up the hill and try to stick with it. If you have momentum and a good line you are going to make it up. Body position has to be adjusted as you climb, front wheel lifting, rear tire spinning and so on. If I know that I'm not going to make it I try to turn around with a little momentum still, makes it easier then stoping or falling then trying to go down.

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I work with what I got sister! A lot of things people suggest to do, I find myself doing naturally. So I quit worrying about it and started riding. The basics I did take into account, elbows out, standing up, learning balance, weight the outside pegs. After that, I do what works best for me. Lean back in sand, lean forward for steep uphills, do what I gotta do to get through rough uphills or downhills, stick the butt out going over things. Etc. screw everything else. Just focus on what works for you. Make sure you have good balance. And stand as much as possible.

That is all.

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Side note: I'm 5'1"

I have had my suspension done and bike lowered. That helps in corners and being able to get my foot down in time.

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