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My front pads are shot so I will be replacing them this weekend with OEM ones. My question is do I need to do anything to the rotor???? Like how you have to get a car rotor turned

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As long as the rotor is within spec for thickness, and the rotor isn't glazed, you don't need to do anything. IIRC it needs to be at least 3mm, but you should refer to the manual to confirm.

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Thanks. Will check that tonight but the rotor appears to have very little wear between were the pads contact it and the rest of the rotor

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I always like to sand the rotor with a fast drill or die grinder and a sanding disc, when putting in new pads. The idea is to get a good cross-hatch pattern on the rotor, not too course, but helps break in the pads and they grip better, more stopping power.

I usually do them on the machine at work, but you can do it on the bike. Just take the caliper off, get someone to spin the tire fast and consistent. Sand the one side, them flip the rotor around and lightly bolt it on backwards to do the other side.

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Just install new pads and you should be good to go.

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Kind of doubt you need new rotors, but if you want a different look, that's something else. I have approx. 10,000 on mine and I put new Galfer pads and rotors on. Probably, in all honestly could have ridden for another 5,000, but I saw a special on Galfer oversized front rotor and went with it. Front braking is much better, but the back is pretty much the same......I DO HOWEVER, really like the look.

New%20brake%20rotor%20002_zpsmtfkthvw.jp

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These are great for scuffing them up if you just do a pad slap. Fits in a drill. I always use it at work on car brakes for customers who just want a pad slap which a lot of times new pads on old rotors can squeak depending on the condition. Works perfect on motorcycle rotors too, freshens them up and makes the surface look like new.

http://www.amazon.com/Brush-Research-Flex-Hone-For-Rotors/dp/B007SOW0WC

Edited by Kx250FRiDeR651
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Kind of doubt you need new rotors, but if you want a different look, that's something else. I have approx. 10,000 on mine and I put new Galfer pads and rotors on. Probably, in all honestly could have ridden for another 5,000, but I saw a special on Galfer oversized front rotor and went with it. Front braking is much better, but the back is pretty much the same......I DO HOWEVER, really like the look.

New%20brake%20rotor%20002_zpsmtfkthvw.jp

That looks great.

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Dusted off on blanchard grinder.   Still new spec.   Been doing it F/R...phenomenal !   And nevertheless OEM pads !

1439691749103.jpg

Edited by Throttle5
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Dusted off on blanchard grinder.   Still new spec.   Been doing it F/R...phenomenal !   And nevertheless OEM pads !

 Awesome, but that would be a difficult or impossible set up on the grinder for the SM front rotor due to the floating feature on that rotor.

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I know this is an old post but I figured I would give it some life-  What is the difference in a non-floating and a floating Rotor?  Does this change the braking power or modulation?

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Just googled it and found my answer-   Here is the info just in case someone else had the same question.   For me it was wondering if it is worth the extra money. 

courtesy of http://www.biketorqueracing.co.uk/btr-tech-station/btr-tech-station-brake-systems/brake-discs/fixed-and-floating-brake-discs

Fixed and Floating Brake Discs

There are three principal types of motorcycle brake discs: fixed, fully floating & semi floating.

A fixed brake disc is a one piece brake disc. That is, its brake pad contact face and wheel mounting face are all part of the same piece of metal. They are relatively cheap to produce and they perform perfectly well within certain parameters, but if they are subjected to serious heat then they are unable to dilate or expand because they are not floating.

Both fully_floating_brake_discs and semi-floating_brake_discs are constructed in two parts. An aluminium centre part which is fixed to the motorcycle wheel and a stainless rotor part which the brake pads push on.

When the rotor is subjected to serious heat it expands. By allowing it to float separately from the mounting face it is free to expand and shrink again at will without being constrained by its mounting. When this expansion takes place is does so in all directions at once and it will not be constrained. If you prevent this from happening in one direction (by fixing it on its mounting face) it has no choice but to warp, so floating_discs and semi-floating_discs are made in two parts to allow the discs to expand and prevent them from warping. This is mainly a high performance type brake disc.

Bikes of more moderate performance can use fixed brake discs perfectly happily and you will also see that most rear brake discs are fixed. This is because they don’t get used as hard and therefore subjected to as much heat. Even so, most rear brake discs are thicker than front brake discs and this is a compromise because the cooling is not as good as the front discs. They don’t get as hot but don’t cool as well either, so the thicker material helps prevent them from warping.

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