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Tubliss tire system

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They're great.  I've used them on a bunch of different bikes.

 

The #1 benefit, besides the comfort and traction, is the ability to just keep riding if you slash a tire.  I've finished technical desert races with a flat rear before and didn't have to worry about the tire coming off the rim.  Can't say that about tubes.

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The #1 benefit, besides the comfort and traction, is the ability to just keep riding if you slash a tire.  I've finished technical desert races with a flat rear before and didn't have to worry about the tire coming off the rim.  Can't say that about tubes.

+1 on this.  I just installed mine in my 19" rear at the start of this summer.  Rode 2 races, and a lot of side riding on them and it worked out far better than I would have anticipated.  I think that this is one of the best things that I have purchased for my bike.  The tire wear is much slower due to the tire hooking up, the bump absorption in the rear end is much better as the low air pressure tends to soak up the trash such as rocks and roots, and the fact that you can ride all day on a flat is a very appealing thing.  

 

This past weekend I was riding with two of my A-Class buddies and we were moving along all day at a pretty solid pace when one time we stopped my buddy informed me that my rear was flat.  Didn't even know it.  The tire hooked up and performed just as it would have with low pressure.  Hindsight I did notice that the rear was a little spongy, but not unbearable and it was hooking up just as if it was in fine shape.  Needless to say, we rode another hour on my flat tire.  Everyone made it back to the truck and all was good.  Got the tire home and put air in it and found that I just punched a hole in the tread, I'm assuming from a rock.  If I would have had more slime in the rear I think it may had plugged itself up.  

 

On my 450f I run a Dunlop AT81RC with 2.5-3.5 psi in it. I always make sure that I have ~ 105-110 psi in the small tube which is a must.  This past weekend I dropped it down to 2 psi before we went out for the ride, and I think that is why I ended up with a flat.    

 

Changing a tire is no more difficult than changing a tire with a tube.  I just changed my second one last night actually, and I had better luck changing that than a normal Ultra Heavy tube.  Just watch their videos online, it makes it much easier.  I think I'd rather change these than a BIB any day.  

 

They say that if you maintain them they will last for a very long time which is something that can't be said for a BIB that WILL wear out eventually.   Main thing to watch is that you don't pinch the red liner when changing out the tire.  

 

I may be rambling, but I have nothing but good things to say about this setup.  

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Thanks guys. I'll order a set for my bike. I think this is going to be the ticket for sand dunes and other places I ride. I'm excited to try them

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+1 on this.  I just installed mine in my 19" rear at the start of this summer.  Rode 2 races, and a lot of side riding on them and it worked out far better than I would have anticipated.  I think that this is one of the best things that I have purchased for my bike.  The tire wear is much slower due to the tire hooking up, the bump absorption in the rear end is much better as the low air pressure tends to soak up the trash such as rocks and roots, and the fact that you can ride all day on a flat is a very appealing thing.  

 

This past weekend I was riding with two of my A-Class buddies and we were moving along all day at a pretty solid pace when one time we stopped my buddy informed me that my rear was flat.  Didn't even know it.  The tire hooked up and performed just as it would have with low pressure.  Hindsight I did notice that the rear was a little spongy, but not unbearable and it was hooking up just as if it was in fine shape.  Needless to say, we rode another hour on my flat tire.  Everyone made it back to the truck and all was good.  Got the tire home and put air in it and found that I just punched a hole in the tread, I'm assuming from a rock.  If I would have had more slime in the rear I think it may had plugged itself up.  

 

On my 450f I run a Dunlop AT81RC with 2.5-3.5 psi in it. I always make sure that I have ~ 105-110 psi in the small tube which is a must.  This past weekend I dropped it down to 2 psi before we went out for the ride, and I think that is why I ended up with a flat.    

 

Changing a tire is no more difficult than changing a tire with a tube.  I just changed my second one last night actually, and I had better luck changing that than a normal Ultra Heavy tube.  Just watch their videos online, it makes it much easier.  I think I'd rather change these than a BIB any day.  

 

They say that if you maintain them they will last for a very long time which is something that can't be said for a BIB that WILL wear out eventually.   Main thing to watch is that you don't pinch the red liner when changing out the tire.  

 

I may be rambling, but I have nothing but good things to say about this setup.  

 

 

What speeds are you running up to with the rear tire at that pressure?  I'm thinking about running the RC in an 18" on the back of my 450 next, and I know they have to be run LOW.  I kept it at about 5-6psi on my 2-stroke in the desert last year (AT81RC 18" tubeless) and it worked okay.

 

How is it to slide the rear end around with it that low?  Feel any squirm when leaned over on flat corners?

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I love them for off road use, but I'm not sure I see the appeal for MX.

I use them (front and rear) for both offroad and MX.  I think it has many benefits for both, I mean really when do you NOT want more traction?

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I use them (front and rear) for both offroad and MX.  I think it has many benefits for both, I mean really when do you NOT want more traction?

 

You only get more traction when running lower pressures. I don't like running low pressures when the speeds will be much above 30 mph consistently (such as in MX) because you get too much tire roll in the corners. I have also found (in my 5+years of running tubliss front and rear) that using Tubliss limits tire selection to very tough tires in order to not get puncture flats. I think that this limitation combined with not needing to run low pressure for MX would be a losing combination IMO. Don't get me wrong, I love Tubliss for off road where my average speeds are typically around 8 mph and I can run around 3-4 psi.

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What would they be like in a very stiff 6 ply off-road/desert tire.  I've been thinking about them, but I don't know if I would benefit over the UHD tubes I'm running now in my Kenda Parker DTs.

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What would they be like in a very stiff 6 ply off-road/desert tire.  I've been thinking about them, but I don't know if I would benefit over the UHD tubes I'm running now in my Kenda Parker DTs.

Those are the best tires to run with a Tubliss......simply air down. You'll love (more than with tubes) tire changes as well. I'm heading to the parts store to get tires for my son's 50, might pick up another Tubliss for my 2nd bike while there...we'll see if they have one in stock.

I'm running one on a Washougal 2, riding harescrambles (track and trail) at 8 PSI and it's magic over the HD tubes I was using. No traction problems, even in momentum stopping, deep, sloppy mud. The front on the other hand.....NEVER, EVER trust the son that you will be racing to set your air pressure  :prof: lesson learned  :doh:

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What would they be like in a very stiff 6 ply off-road/desert tire.  I've been thinking about them, but I don't know if I would benefit over the UHD tubes I'm running now in my Kenda Parker DTs.

 

I've run it with the Parkers before.  Worked great.  Again, super low pressures, never felt the rim.

 

The National that I flatted on, I rode through the entire second loop with a Parker set up tubeless that ended up with no air in it.  It wiggled a bit in the sand and I couldn't just slam the rocky stuff the same way, but besides that it was just fine.  Even on loose chunky hillclimbs it never slipped or wanted to unravel off the rim.  Sold me on them.  I would have had a LONG day getting out of there if I had flatted and not been able to keep riding.

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I don't typically run at high speeds for a long time. But I have been to top speed on low pressures and it feels just like normal. For Mx, I just bump the pressure up to 7-8 to limit tire roll. I think the little bit of tire roll that there is, is outweighed by the traction gains you pick up from the low pressure.

As for the tire choice, you'll definitely want to run the desert tire if you want the low pressure. If you want to run something like a mx32 or some Pirelli you'll have to run a slightly higher pressure, but with the softer sidewall you may still have good traction. I spend most of my time in the woods, so AT81's will be my choice for as long as they make them.

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I don't typically run at high speeds for a long time. But I have been to top speed on low pressures and it feels just like normal. For Mx, I just bump the pressure up to 7-8 to limit tire roll. I think the little bit of tire roll that there is, is outweighed by the traction gains you pick up from the low pressure.

As for the tire choice, you'll definitely want to run the desert tire if you want the low pressure. If you want to run something like a mx32 or some Pirelli you'll have to run a slightly higher pressure, but with the softer sidewall you may still have good traction. I spend most of my time in the woods, so AT81's will be my choice for as long as they make them.

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I don't typically run at high speeds for a long time. But I have been to top speed on low pressures and it feels just like normal. For Mx, I just bump the pressure up to 7-8 to limit tire roll. I think the little bit of tire roll that there is, is outweighed by the traction gains you pick up from the low pressure.

As for the tire choice, you'll definitely want to run the desert tire if you want the low pressure. If you want to run something like a mx32 or some Pirelli you'll have to run a slightly higher pressure, but with the softer sidewall you may still have good traction. I spend most of my time in the woods, so AT81's will be my choice for as long as they make them.

 

The AT81RC was not tough enough for me. I put multiple punctures in it i the first few rides. I am now on a Shinko 520 and it's been flawless. About 15 hrs on it so far and still has about 80% tread.

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Same here with the Shinko 520...very durable and handles nicely with 3psi open desert/rocky technical canyons. And almost half the price of the at81

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I run them on my yz250. Probably one of the best mods I've ever put on my bike. Run them with Maxxis desert IT's 5 psi rear and 9 front. I hit some big rocks at speed some times and I've yet to damage a wheel.

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I run them on my yz250. Probably one of the best mods I've ever put on my bike. Run them with Maxxis desert IT's 5 psi rear and 9 front. I hit some big rocks at speed some times and I've yet to damage a wheel.

 

I used to run the desert IT's with the Tubliss for the first few years, but they chunked pretty bad so I went in search of something better.

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I'm curious how long the bladders last/tire changes before needing to be replaced? That's been the one thing that I have been hesitant about going to them....?

 

It matters how careful you are digging your spoons between the tire and rim when changing your tire. A little over two years on the same bladder lining for me.

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Couple questions, as i've been considering these for awhile also. In muddy sections, nasty, thick peanut butter on top of hardpack, do the desert front tires with tubliss work as well as MX32 fronts with tubes? Even with reduced pressure, I have a hard time seeing intermediate tires cleaning out well. Has anyone tried Tubliss with an Equilibrium rear? I think I could climb trees with that combo. I hope I'm not posting questions already answered elsewhere.

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