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Lighting stator 1 vs 2 yellow wires.

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I bought a bike that was converted to be road legal and had a stealthy off-road lighting coil installed. The stator went out and rather than pinpoint and try to repair I bought a new electric world lighting stator, assuming it would be a direct swap.

However, I have a small issue where the old stator had 2 yellow wires and the new one only as one. What is the best method for hooking up just one yellow wire to the harness that was built around 2?

**side note: I apologize but I am not very well knowledged when it comes to electrical.

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You did not buy a factory part but one that 'the guy said would work'.

 

Make/Model/Year?

 

Some bikes use the chassis for a connection from the stator.

Some bikes have two sections from teh stator and share the cahassis as the 'third wire'

Some bikes have to have the chassis isolated from the stator due to the stator being AC and part of the bike DC.

 

Personally? I'd get the correct part.

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To clarify, it's a 96 yz125 so it does not have any oem lighting components. I bought it from someone who had created a harness and added all the necessary electrical components to obtain a plate for the bike. A lighting coil was added to the oem stator, which charges a battery mounted in the air box, and that powers everything. Previously all lights worked correctly.

As there are not many lighting options for this bike (and I'm not great with electrical) I opted to replace the entire stator with one that is already assembled and intended for the bike. The only issue is the stealthy coil that was previously used had 2 yellow lighting wires, however this replacement stator only has 1 yellow lighting wire.

I have seen topics on this scattered through Google searches, but no definitive answer on the best way to hook this up. I am hoping there is a quick solution to this.

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There isn't.  Too much variation in the aftermarket solutions is the problem.  IMO, your best bet would be to take a couple of good pictures of the thing and contact Ricky Stator to see if they can identify how it's laid out.  In fact, someone here may recognize it.

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I am at work right now, but when I get home I can try to snap a few pics if those would be beneficial.

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two wire coils are usually isolated from chassis ground and so are not interchangeable with one wire coils which ground the other non-wire side of the coil

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So a little more info. I pulled the spare parts that came with the bike and the coil that was sold by stealthy off-road is a electrex world and appears identical. I attached some directions that were in the old coil box and it appears I need to float the ground to run dc (which I apparently need for my led blinkers, horn, and tail light).

I attached 2 pics of the stator I bought, anyone have any idea on how to float the ground on this one? And is this indeed the correct way to hook it up. (I prefer not to modify the stator if possible) I can take additional pictures as well if needed.

Lastly I attached a picture of the directions for installing the initial coil to the oem stator.

Any help would be great.

IMAG0777.jpg

1446686775927207539289.jpg

1446686837256-1916786208.jpg

1446687197309-465942160.jpg

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I am no electrical engineer  and without a real cose look at it I would bet that the one particular coil that had two yellow wires   is nothing more  than the other coil not going to a mounting screw ground .   Look real close at the single wire lighting coil  and you will probably see  an extremely fine wire coming out of the coil wrap going right to a mounting screw hole. now you could  try and cut that real fine wire and solder a yellow wire ,(of the same thickness as the other yellow  wire coming out of it),  to it   or...... take one of the yellow wires  of your voltage regulator and mount it to a good chassis ground. would not now the benefits or drawbacks of either but all you need to do is complete the circuit.     chassis grounds are problematic due to corrosion between bolted connections (lighting coil to engine , engine to frame , eyelet of voltage regulator to frame.   but the only two things I know for certain about elecricity  is that if you see a bad wire it is bad  but if you see a good wire it still might be bad

 

 

from what I understand as a prominent dual sport kit company explained to me  to "float the ground"  is nothing more that hardwiring your lighting coil to the voltage regulator / rectifier.   excluding design and fitment  electricicty is relatively simple in that you need to be able to make a complete loop.    normal dirt bike lighting coil systems  that are d.c. lights   usually  have a single coil in the magnetic field  prducing a.c. current  .  the lighting coil  can have a single yellow wire  the other end of the coil wire chassis mounted  one yellow wire of the voltage regulator/rectifier to the yellow wire of the lighting coil  the other yellow wire of the regulator  going to  the chassis , the red and black wire s coming out of the regulator go to the lights  etc.      but to the float the ground  you actually cut the wire that goes to the chassis( my uneducated guess from this side of the interweb without ohmmeter) would be in the third picture picture the one under the philips head screw.  undo that screw  and find someone with an ohmeter  and see if there is resistance between  the eyelet and the end of the yellow wire  that matches what  the lighting coil manufacture states it should be.  if that is in fact the lighting coil cut the eyelet off and solder a wire to it  and carefully snake it up and around through the stator plate and into the harness.as your second yellow wire.

 

a thousand and one disclaimers  about  I am not an electician  I am not a electrical engineer    I have no intimate knowledge of how the person before you wired a motocross bike with a lighting circuit.  it is possible though that he was running his lights in a.c.   with only a 2 yellow wire voltage regulator(no red and black wires that are rectified to d.c.) in which the answer would be different

Edited by jsantapau

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So in short, if I'm understanding correctly... Since the new coil is grounded to the stator plate I should be able to connect the yellow wire off the stator to one of the yellow wires coming off the regulator. I could then ground the other yellow wire that is currently attached to the regulator to the frame in order to complete the circuit.

Does it matter which yellow wire coming off the regulator is grounded? It looks like a generic Chinese 4 prong scooter regulator.

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Magic,

I think thjeadvice Jsan gave you is sound regarding looking for coil ground and and "floating" it.  

 

Your original two wire system was a full wave system.  Chances are your regulator / rectifier are fullwave also.  If you just connect one yellow wire to it and one to the frame it should work.

 

Normally this depends on how you wired your DC.....common frame grounds or seperate ground wires.   A half wave regulator is needed  if you have common AC/DC grounds, which I dont think is your case here based on your prior stator 

 

Do you have the old two wire stator?  If its dead take it off the mounting plate and do the same with the new one...it might be as simple as comparing the two and finding the isolated ground on the dead one and replicating the situation on the new one.  You could even cut the wire off the old one to solder on if its possible.  

 

Generally a half wave regulator / rectifer is used in common ground AC / DC systems ( Think WR250F ) .  The disadvantage to this system is generally you only get half of the current.  Hence why you hear alot people floating grounds to run full wave DC systems with large lights and other power demands.  If your just running bare minimum lights and low wattage single bulb headlight you may be okay.  If not you may find the charging system can not keep up with the battery discharge and drain the battery. 

 

You should be able to ground one of the yellow wires to the frame but if it was me I would try to replicate the two wire system.  If you can solder its really not a big deal.

 

I have done it on 2001 WR250F stator and a half wave AC/DC 2006 WR250F to full DC.  Just make sure you have a good high wattage solder iron 

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Thank you Lotus and Jsan for the insight. I finally got around to making some time to work on this and installed the new stator. I have spark and bike runs again so that part is checked off the list.

However, it doesn't appear the lighting portion is working. I have the regulator/rectifier hooked up as indicated in the attachment. The one yellow coming off the stator goes to the top right prong. The bottom left is grounded to the frame since the lighting coil should be grounded to the stator plate. Is this correct?

Any thoughts/suggestions?

Thanks

Rect.gif

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sounds ok to me but just box up the defective one and send it back for repairs your bike runs but has no lights do you need them to be legal or just to ride at night ?

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Thank you Lotus and Jsan for the insight. I finally got around to making some time to work on this and installed the new stator. I have spark and bike runs again so that part is checked off the list.

However, it doesn't appear the lighting portion is working. I have the regulator/rectifier hooked up as indicated in the attachment. The one yellow coming off the stator goes to the top right prong. The bottom left is grounded to the frame since the lighting coil should be grounded to the stator plate. Is this correct?

Any thoughts/suggestions?

 

The diagram you posted with both AC and Dc sharing the ground is for a half wave system.  Are you sure your regulator / rectifer is a half wave system?  With your fist post about having two yellow wires  on the original stator ( full wave ) I would have expected you to show the  DC grounds as being separate wires.   Is DC grounded on your bike frame or directly to the battery? 

 

Unplug the yellow wire, start the bike and use a voltmeter to see if the you have voltage from the stator charging coil.  One lead on the yellow wire, one lead on the engine ( like the cylinder studs since they most likely are not painted ).  If you have voltage ..... then your regulator and or wiring  is the issue.  .  Hook everything back up and disconnect the DC ground.  Same test but with one lead on +  and one lead going to the now disconnected - ground. .   Does it put out voltage?  

 

 Your new setup probably has both AC and Dc grounded so it may be messing up the signal from the regualtor / rectifer compared to the old setup had AC isolated from the frame ( two wires )

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The diagram you posted with both AC and Dc sharing the ground is for a half wave system.  Are you sure your regulator / rectifer is a half wave system?  With your fist post about having two yellow wires  on the original stator ( full wave ) I would have expected you to show the  DC grounds as being separate wires.   Is DC grounded on your bike frame or directly to the battery? 

 

Unplug the yellow wire, start the bike and use a voltmeter to see if the you have voltage from the stator charging coil.  One lead on the yellow wire, one lead on the engine ( like the cylinder studs since they most likely are not painted ).  If you have voltage ..... then your regulator and or wiring  is the issue.  .  Hook everything back up and disconnect the DC ground.  Same test but with one lead on +  and one lead going to the now disconnected - ground. .   Does it put out voltage?  

 

 Your new setup probably has both AC and Dc grounded so it may be messing up the signal from the regualtor / rectifer compared to the old setup had AC isolated from the frame ( two wires )

 

I did both tests and it I am getting voltage readings coming off the charging coil and  I tested a few other points and it i received readings through the system to the lighting portion of the harness. However, I was expecting that I should be able to obtain lighting output without a battery connected, (As my CT-70  with a Lifan engine/modified harness still does). Maybe not?

 

It could be the way the harness was built... using my ohm meter I tested a few wires to trace them best I could through the system and it appears the power coming off the rectifier/regulator goes into a "Y" connection with the positive terminal from the battery and the lighting portion of the harness. This runs power to the lighting components which are then each individually grounded. Then the negative on the battery is grounded to the frame completing the circuit. Is this correct? (Let me know if it doesn't make sense and I can try to draw it out in word.)

 

With the battery hooked up everything works as should, therefore I am unsure if the battery is the only thing powering the system or if the lighting coil is working correctly?

 

Thanks again

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I did both tests and it I am getting voltage readings coming off the charging coil and  I tested a few other points and it i received readings through the system to the lighting portion of the harness. However, I was expecting that I should be able to obtain lighting output without a battery connected, (As my CT-70  with a Lifan engine/modified harness still does). Maybe not?

 

It could be the way the harness was built... using my ohm meter I tested a few wires to trace them best I could through the system and it appears the power coming off the rectifier/regulator goes into a "Y" connection with the positive terminal from the battery and the lighting portion of the harness. This runs power to the lighting components which are then each individually grounded. Then the negative on the battery is grounded to the frame completing the circuit. Is this correct? (Let me know if it doesn't make sense and I can try to draw it out in word.)

 

With the battery hooked up everything works as should, therefore I am unsure if the battery is the only thing powering the system or if the lighting coil is working correctly?

 

Thanks again

Yes you need a battery or a large capacitor at minimum.  Hook it up and test the voltage across the battery, then do the same while its running...is the voltage higher while running.?  ~13Vs or so

Edited by lotus241

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Yes you need a battery or a large capacitor at minimum.  Hook it up and test the voltage across the battery, then do the same while its running...is the voltage higher while running.?  ~13Vs or so

Voltage stayed the same at 12.4 with the bike running or not.

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