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14' 300 RR WEIGHT LOSS PROJECT

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I did this as more of an experiment to see how much I could lighten a 300 I just picked up, because it felt like a pig.

I ride really tight nasty single track and the first two rides out I was whipped 1/2 way through the day...not usual for me.

The bike came loaded with the following equipment.

Rekluse, lrhb, radiator guards, hand guards, pipe cage, tug straps, tubliss f/r, rear shark fin, fork bleeders, extended brake tip.

Stupid me I didn't weight it prior to stripping it down but it had to be between 240 -250 lbs, no fuel

I had sent the suspension out for a respring and revalve, so while I was waiting I got to work stripping off what I could.

Items removed

Rekluse...not really a fan

LHRB.......not usefull to me without the Rekluse

Battery

All non-essential wiring

Brake pressure switches

Kick stand

E-starter

rear upper chain guards

front sprocket guard

switched to non o-ring chain

switched muffler to a pro circuit 304

Soft seat foam

Small gas tank

For weighing purposes I also stripped off all the armor except the rear shark fin, tubliss and fork bleeders..."ya I know"

I took the bike down to the local recycling center, they have a commercial digital scale I could use.

We pre-checked the scale with a one pound metal test weigh, we then threw the stand on it, zeroed the scale and placed the bike on the stand.

To my dissbelief the scale read 220 lbs.

So, we pulled the bike off, retested the scale with the weight, tested it with the weight on the stand "all good" and again re-weighed the bike, yep...220lbs

We even placed the 1lb weight on the seat...221lbs...."really 220lbs"

Could probably shead another pound or two with titanlum foot pegs, maybe more with a ti bolt kit...but that ain't happening.

I will say the bike feels way lighter just pushing it around.

Now I have to decide what weight I'll be putting back on the bike.

Skid plate.............3lbs

CF pipe guard......2lbs

hand guards........2lbs

radiator cages.....2lbs

That's roughly 9 lbs back on the bike.

Side note:

The e-starter weights right around 2lbs, for the amount of work needed to remove it...."not worth it".

Those of you that ride more open trails, I don't think you'll notice the weight loss as much, you'd be better off keeping the estart and switching to a lighter ion battery.

I still need to get in a few rides to see if this project was really worth the effort...feels worth it just loading and unloading the bike.

Here's a few pics of the bike prior to weighing it.

Thanks

 

DSCN0412_zpsqhzvtawg.jpg

 

DSCN0413_zpsahycypqt.jpg

 

DSCN0414_zpstikphpse.jpgDSCN0415_zpsjiezuy0l.jpgDSCN0416_zpsxjdg9s4i.jpgDSCN0417_zpso47sggy7.jpg

 

 

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I did this as more of an experiment to see how much I could lighten a 300 I just picked up, because it felt like a pig.

I ride really tight nasty single track and the first two rides out I was whipped 1/2 way through the day...not usual for me.

The bike came loaded with the following equipment.

Rekluse, lrhb, radiator guards, hand guards, pipe cage, tug straps, tubliss f/r, rear shark fin, fork bleeders, extended brake tip.

Stupid me I didn't weight it prior to stripping it down but it had to be between 240 -250 lbs, no fuel

I had sent the suspension out for a respring and revalve, so while I was waiting I got to work stripping off what I could.

Items removed

Rekluse...not really a fan

LHRB.......not usefull to me without the Rekluse

Battery

All non-essential wiring

Brake pressure switches

Kick stand

E-starter

rear upper chain guards

front sprocket guard

switched to non o-ring chain

switched muffler to a pro circuit 304

Soft seat foam

Small gas tank

For weighing purposes I also stripped off all the armor except the rear shark fin, tubliss and fork bleeders..."ya I know"

I took the bike down to the local recycling center, they have a commercial digital scale I could use.

We pre-checked the scale with a one pound metal test weigh, we then threw the stand on it, zeroed the scale and placed the bike on the stand.

To my dissbelief the scale read 220 lbs.

So, we pulled the bike off, retested the scale with the weight, tested it with the weight on the stand "all good" and again re-weighed the bike, yep...220lbs

We even placed the 1lb weight on the seat...221lbs...."really 220lbs"

Could probably shead another pound or two with titanlum foot pegs, maybe more with a ti bolt kit...but that ain't happening.

I will say the bike feels way lighter just pushing it around.

Now I have to decide what weight I'll be putting back on the bike.

Skid plate.............3lbs

CF pipe guard......2lbs

hand guards........2lbs

radiator cages.....2lbs

That's roughly 9 lbs back on the bike.

Side note:

The e-starter weights right around 2lbs, for the amount of work needed to remove it...."not worth it".

Those of you that ride more open trails, I don't think you'll notice the weight loss as much, you'd be better off keeping the estart and switching to a lighter ion battery.

I still need to get in a few rides to see if this project was really worth the effort...feels worth it just loading and unloading the bike.

Here's a few pics of the bike prior to weighing it.

Thanks

 

DSCN0412_zpsqhzvtawg.jpg

 

DSCN0413_zpsahycypqt.jpg

 

DSCN0414_zpstikphpse.jpgDSCN0415_zpsjiezuy0l.jpgDSCN0416_zpsxjdg9s4i.jpgDSCN0417_zpso47sggy7.jpg

Nice job, bike looks good!!

 

What handle bars/bend are you running there?

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Stupid me I didn't weight it prior to stripping it down

 

This statement should have been in bold. Essentially a meaningless thread without this number.

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That's insane! I could never wrap my head around why so many guys are concerned with a few pounds. For me as long as the dual sport is under 300 and 2T under 275 (ready to ride with full tank of fuel) then I'm happy as can be. If the bike weight is wearing you down then it's time to train and lose body fat. 

 

No hand guards or skid plate? Yikes!! And the added pounds of a really heavy rear trials tire? 

 

Here is my 300 ready to ride at just about 270lbs. It's a feather. I can lift it over almost anything. And as long as I hit the gym a few times a week it's a all day single track weapon.

 

100_4027_zps5b9877fe.jpg

 

When I do extreme riding on my Beta, It's nothing more than a few extra squats, box jumps, lunges, rows, planks, dumbell presses, negitive pull ups (cause I cant do even one)  :( , and bent over rows. Never weighed it as you see it here, but I figure it's about 300lbs with 5.5 gal. of fuel. Perfectly acceptable for anything from pavement to rock crawling single track.

 

IMG_0856_zpslhunoxfz.jpg

 

What is it that get guys so freaked out with bike weight? OTOH, you got a whole other group that buys a X-Trainer, starts bitching about shitty suspension and crappy wheels. They then start adding huge pounds to it in hopes to making it a competitive desert racer? WOW!!

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I like it! Great experiment. It's easy for big stong guys to scoff at a few pounds. Little runts like me need shave every pound possible. Not so much when riding, it's picking it up in a deep crevasse after falling in that sucks the energy right outta me

 

How does the original weight feel compared to the xtrainer? I'm thinking doing the opposite of you, and go from a 300rr to an xtrainer

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What is it that get guys so freaked out with bike weight?

 

Well shit, Chris, not everybody rides the same stuff or the same way. What about when the gym won't do it any more, when you pass 60 or 70 or 80 years old, and your body strength just isn't there anymore, and isn't coming back? What if you are young, but you just love to ride the most extreme terrain you can find without stopping or footing, and you still want to cover more ground than is feasible on a trials bike, but don't want to drag an overweight pig over every rock outcrop you clamber up? 

 

No everybody is a racer, but even a recreational rider wants the best combination of light weight, power delivery, and handling to suit his style of riding. The XT has great potential for certain kinds of riding, but when your cross the threshold and exceed its capabilities with your skill and demands, but find the the RR is a little more in some areas than you want, then you have some hard choices to make: extend the capabilities of the XT, or cut back the weight and retune the power of the RR?

 

Moto9 has chosen (after making some well-chosen mods to his XT, and finding the suspension and handling still wanting) to take the RR down a notch (in weight) to try to find his sweet spot. He'd probably hate your bike, and you'd probably hate his, but you probably will both love your own. 

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If you haven't suffered deep in a jungle valley for 6 to 9 hours you wouldn't understand.

Sometimes your pushing and bull dogging as much as you are riding. That's why so many guys choose to ride trials bikes here.

I can tell by just looking at your bike you wouldn't last long on a hard core ride here.

That pig would be pissing coolant in the first 10 minutes.

Just saying.

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220 lbs - unreal! 

 

I think items (9 lbs) that you're contimplating putting back on the bike would be a good idea, as they could save you much grief if left off and you crash.

 

I assume my Beta weighs more than my KTM (both 3hundos) as it takes my Olive Oyl arms more oomph to pick up the rear end of the Beta vs the KTM..But as mentioned, I find some creature comforts worth the weight.

 

Like.......a kickstand.

 

juz zayin. 

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For the most part a kickstand is useless here, it's usually so greasy and muddy, either lean it against a tree or gass off, lay it on it's side.

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Descending down into the valley, few hundred feet of fun or terror, however you want to look at it...and the rocks, roots are so slick you foot slides right off.

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If you haven't suffered deep in a jungle valley for 6 to 9 hours you wouldn't understand.

Sometimes your pushing and bull dogging as much as you are riding. That's why so many guys choose to ride trials bikes here.

I can tell by just looking at your bike you wouldn't last long on a hard core ride here.

That pig would be pissing coolant in the first 10 minutes.

Just saying.

 

No pissing coolant for me. I run Evans! I for sure know I would not last in a jungle ride. It's not what I'm used to. Just as you would be struggling on the rocks and dust we have out West. It's cool what your doing. We all have our setups we like. 

 

 

Well shit, Chris, not everybody rides the same stuff or the same way. What about when the gym won't do it any more, when you pass 60 or 70 or 80 years old, and your body strength just isn't there anymore, and isn't coming back? What if you are young, but you just love to ride the most extreme terrain you can find without stopping or footing, and you still want to cover more ground than is feasible on a trials bike, but don't want to drag an overweight pig over every rock outcrop you clamber up? 

 

No everybody is a racer, but even a recreational rider wants the best combination of light weight, power delivery, and handling to suit his style of riding. The XT has great potential for certain kinds of riding, but when your cross the threshold and exceed its capabilities with your skill and demands, but find the the RR is a little more in some areas than you want, then you have some hard choices to make: extend the capabilities of the XT, or cut back the weight and retune the power of the RR?

 

Moto9 has chosen (after making some well-chosen mods to his XT, and finding the suspension and handling still wanting) to take the RR down a notch (in weight) to try to find his sweet spot. He'd probably hate your bike, and you'd probably hate his, but you probably will both love your own. 

 

Hell I'm 54! The gym is already starting to not do it anymore. The last extreme ride I got my ass handed to me. For me it's what I'm used to. I will say the times when I have the continual tip overs and lifting over crap it's pretty tough. Steering damper, handguards and skidplate I could never see myself without.

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switched to non o-ring chain

I would love to know how you get a non o-ring chain to last more than a weekend or two. I can't even get Ironman front sprockets to make it more than a few trips in Arkansas and Missouri.

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I would love to know how you get a non o-ring chain to last more than a weekend or two. I can't even get Ironman front sprockets to make it more than a few trips in Arkansas and Missouri.

 

Yeah, that's a trade-off I'd make in favor of longevity. I wonder if the difference in weight is much more than 1/4 lb?

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Hell I'm 54! The gym is already starting to not do it anymore. The last extreme ride I got my ass handed to me. For me it's what I'm used to. I will say the times when I have the continual tip overs and lifting over crap it's pretty tough. Steering damper, handguards and skidplate I could never see myself without.

 

Different strokes.... I don't need the steering damper, but I'm with you on the handguards, skid plate, shark fin, and any other stuff that will keep me from the end of a tow rope. I would approach my lightening expedition the same way moto9 has: take off everything i'm pretty sure I don't need, then add all the stuff I know I'll need, and see what I end up with. May have to rinse and repeat a couple of times before the wash is done.

 

Nothing's ever perfect. Damned bikes today are so good, though, that it almost seems sacrilegious to mess with them! But I always was a hellion.

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If you haven't suffered deep in a jungle valley for 6 to 9 hours you wouldn't understand.

Sometimes your pushing and bull dogging as much as you are riding. That's why so many guys choose to ride trials bikes here.

I can tell by just looking at your bike you wouldn't last long on a hard core ride here.

That pig would be pissing coolant in the first 10 minutes.

Just saying.

 If you ever took Chris to some of the places we ride he would soil himself. Provided that is , that he makes it out of the parking lot.

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I found this interesting,

I was watching some hard enduro videos on utube.

Johnny walker and Graham Jarvis were going at it.

Walker was on a ktm, anyway in the video each one stalled their bike and was kicking to restart it.

Which tells me they probably did the same thing and stripped off the estart.

For me...It's rare that the estart is more than just a nice convenience, I don't stall that often.

Edited by moto9

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