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suspension setup question (150 lbs rider)

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Crf450x'012, stock suspension, setup for now:

 

front comp 20 clicks

front rebound 12 clicks

rear hs comp 3 turns out

rear ls comp 21 clicks

rear rebound 14 clicks

 

Stock springs, no revalve, race sag 100mm. I'm happy with this setup on fast loops, but in tight technical stuff and low speeds it feels harsh. Tried different setups, dropping oil level in front fork (from 324 to 310 cm3), but it did not help.

Can someone give me advice based on my weight - which setup can i try?

Thanks for advices!

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Clicker positions are not transferable from bike to bike....unless the oil is stock and brand new.

 

The best thing you can do is change the oil, as the stock oil is terrible, and if you have some coin, get the pressure spring changed and the shim stack modified for your skill level and riding style.

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Reading the manual, it says change fork oil every 7.5 hours and then like every 11.5 in the dampener. Does anyone do this religiously? I've never changed the fork oil but am going to do that tonight. All my suspension is as it was from showroom floor, I've never adjusted anything. I'm 5'10" and 160lbs. I'm just now feeling like my abilities can be improved with tuning the suspension.

All helps/tips appreciated!

Edited by jaredudall

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if you call Factory Connection they will tell you the forks come from factory with to much preload!They would also probably suggest lighter springs for your weight!

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I have a 2008 450x and I am the same weight as you. I do an even mix of wide open trails and tighter trails as well. I took the time to set up the sag, do adjustments with the clickers and changed the oil out numerous times when doing basic maintenance or seal replacements. I had it set up pretty good for me. Then I took off the stock steering stabilizer and installed a Scott's stabilizer which in my experience changed the handling characteristics of the bike in a great way, but also made me change my suspension settings to make it work better for me. I can give you the settings that I'm using however as Krannie said they won't transfer from bike to bike, but it may get you closer to a good starting point and you can do further adjustments from there.

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Hondamoto74, if you could post those settings for all of us to see, that would be great. I also am in that weight range with an 08, and would like to see how your settings compare to mine. If you dont mind. Thank you.

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Hondamoto74, if you could post those settings for all of us to see, that would be great. I also am in that weight range with an 08, and would like to see how your settings compare to mine. If you dont mind. Thank you.

No problem. I have them at home and will post up when I get home from work today.

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Got the oil swapped out and set the sag at 105mm. I'll post my thoughts after I ride on Wednesday.

Too much sag...the front is going to want to push. 100mm.

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I didn't notice it pushing, I'll set it at 100 and return and report. We ride fast sections with some pretty deep sand at times. Lots of good smooth turns the you can stay in 3rd to 4th and feel comfortable in. I did notice how much faster I can take the whoops but I'm sure that is also due to the steering dampener. I'm pretty excited about the whole thing. Any rules of thumb considering clicker settings? I don't really know what to look for. I get what you say about the sag, because that drops the rear end and extends the front tire/fork forward. But I'm having a hard time thinking through what to look for as it pertains to the specifics of the rebound. Any help greatly appreciated.

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Lots of good articles, if you google search 'dirt bike suspension set up '

 

IMHO

Essentially, you want to keep the suspension speed as fast as you can, without having it push back and making the bike bounce.

You also do not want the suspension to 'pack' or limit travel, from too much compression.

 

...but you can't literally do that without changing the valve tuning inside the fork, as you only have two "trim" adjustment clickers.

So you start with  much less compression and more rebound, and see what you can feel.

You want to reduce compression right away, as adding more rebound will have an affect (increase) on the compression to a minor degree.

 

Ideally, the bike does not 'push back' over a bump (too little rebound)  or 'stay down' after going over a bump (too much rebound).

 

Once you get that to where it feels neutral, you try the compression clickers.

More compression clicks also keep the bike 'higher' at all times, so the handing changes noticable when you go 3 clicks or so in either direction.

Judge the compression by stabbing at the front brake, and see if the bike 'dives' when you do that. 

More compression will reduce dive, but create a stiffer ride.

 

For the rear, you really need to go through some rolling bumps to check compression (low speed) and sharp angled bumps (high speed).

Typically, backing off on the high speed compression will improve rear wheel traction, but not feel.

I like mine dead in the rear (much less high speed compression, like 3/4 of a turn less) so when going up hill, the rear wheel tracks and keeps traction.

 

 

 

 

Remember, that front to rear  balance is affected with every click, so if you can get the sag right, then the rebound right front and rear, the compresson will come easily.

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Thanks for that. I feel like the front is set up pretty good. I think I need to increase the rebound dampening, it seemed to buck and even kick out in some of the bigger whoops.

Increase the rebound on the rear shock. To be clear.

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Thanks for that. I feel like the front is set up pretty good. I think I need to increase the rebound dampening, it seemed to buck and even kick out in some of the bigger whoops.

Increase the rebound on the rear shock. To be clear.

 

Too much rebound could do the same thing...

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I didn't notice it pushing, I'll set it at 100 and return and report. We ride fast sections with some pretty deep sand at times. Lots of good smooth turns the you can stay in 3rd to 4th and feel comfortable in. I did notice how much faster I can take the whoops but I'm sure that is also due to the steering dampener. I'm pretty excited about the whole thing. Any rules of thumb considering clicker settings? I don't really know what to look for. I get what you say about the sag, because that drops the rear end and extends the front tire/fork forward. But I'm having a hard time thinking through what to look for as it pertains to the specifics of the rebound. Any help greatly appreciated.

Read and re-read your susp adjustment section in your owners manual. Great info specific to your bike.

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