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Fingers on brake and clutch levers

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Ok so I've been riding for years without doing this but I've been trying to keep two fingers on each lever. It just feels weird. I was gonna adjust the positioning of the levers. Anyone got any advice how to position them so it's more comfortable. I'm trying to ride the right way but I'm having a real hard time

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First, the bars (grip area)  should be level with the ground. The bars not titled forward or backward.
Sit on the bike. Drape/lay your hands on the bars. The levers should sit just below (like 1/4") your fingers.

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I always keep a finger on the clutch and sometimes brake, just helps you be ready if you have to make a quick decision or something, might feel weird at first but eventually you'll get used to it. I like to have my clutch lever a little bit down, makes it feel more natural

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I used to be in that bad habit of keeping fingers on the levers, I broke myself of it.  If you don't keep fingers on the levers you will find you are much more relaxed and able to concentrate on just riding.  Try it, you will be amazed at how much more relaxed you feel and how much more flowing your riding will be. ;)

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Like the first time you wore boots, awkward. But you will get used to it very quickly. One finger is better than two.

 

And no fingers is better than one. ;)

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I only keep fingers on the levers in tricky technical downhills and usually just 1 finger on the front brake. Never felt the need to keep fingers on levers if I'm not actively using them.

Used to use two but on wet, rocky downhill trails where I'm bouncing off one rock to the next I feel more in control with 4 fingers on the grip. One finger is more than enough to operate my front break in those situations where my bars are moving all over and I'm using near constant, light front break pressure.

Edited by OCsquid
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I only keep fingers on the levers in tricky technical downhills and usually just 1 finger on the front brake. Never felt the need to keep fingers on levers if I'm not actively using them.

 

Exactly. ;)

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I keep 2 on the clutch and one on the brake at all times simply because all of the research I did on proper riding form said to ride like that.

It felt awkward at first but now I don't even think about it.

Cheers,

Jon

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You guys that feel you need to be "ready" to brake or clutch really need to try riding without your fingers "ready".  It is much more relaxing, you will be less prone to arm pump, and the miniscule amount of time that it takes to move your finger(s) from grip to lever is so small as to probably be something that can't even be measured.

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You guys that feel you need to be "ready" to brake or clutch really need to try riding without your fingers "ready". It is much more relaxing, you will be less prone to arm pump, and the miniscule amount of time that it takes to move your finger(s) from grip to lever is so small as to probably be something that can't even be measured.

It's really not needed unless in certain situations in racing, because many times I've almost wrecked or stalled my bike because I can't get my hand to pull in the front brake or clutch while I'm hitting braking bumps, it's a lot easier to have it there and ready. But I agree if you aren't in a intense racing environment or a sketchy situation it probably really doesn't help

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I personally feel that a finger on the clutch is essential.... You know you need it to regulate the power to the ground...

Having your finger on the front brake is matter of choice however pulling in the front brake accidentally can be really bad... In sections on the track where I feel I will not need my front brake I have my fingers GENTLY wrapped around the throttle ( basically don't squeeze the grips too hard ) and will move one finger to the brake entering a section I need the brakes and it will remain there until I exit the section.

Sight laps should be a good time to 'plan' your lines and think about braking and where it's necessary.

Ruts and trail braking require fingers on the clutch and brake although you should not 'need' the clutch in a rut unless you get caught out and need to get out of trouble....

Whoops/sand sections/jumps clutch is a great tool. I found it a good skill to start developing brake tapping by having a finger on the clutch all the way up the jump face then pull in the clutch and release it with a crack of the throttle to land smooth... I gain a lot of confidence in clutch use with this...

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I PERSONALLY like to have my handle bars slightly rotated forward (which is off topic) but IMO you need to set handle bar position first.

 

Then getting the levers set-up correctly which starts getting into a a lot of variables and will depend on what levers your running and hydraulic or cable etc.

 

So my set up and why..

 

Distance perch's are away from your grips

Clutch - Cable system and the perch is about 2.5 inches away from my grip. This gives me excellent 2 finger leverage.

Front brake - Hydraulic (sort of obvious) and the perch is about 1.5 inches from the throttle cable housing. This gives me excellent 1 finger leverage.

 

Rotation of perch's

Both clutch/front brake about 45Deg - For me this position works well for both standing and sitting.

 

As a suggestion, get your bars set-up and tight. Then the perches close to where you think they work but slightly loose. so as you ride you can move them up/down or in/out until you find what works for you. This now gets in to hand guards and levers BUT I use breakaway levers so have the perches pretty snug but you can keep them slightly loose them so the perch's can rotate before your levers break

 

Then I ride about 99% of the time with 2 on the clutch and 1 on the front.

 

And another long winded posted

Edited by filterx
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Probably why I have the original clutch in my bike, I'm not riding around with my fingers on the lever. It's like driving around in your car with your foot riding on the clutch pedal. ;=)

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Probably why I have the original clutch in my bike, I'm not riding around with my fingers on the lever. It's like driving around in your car with your foot riding on the clutch pedal. ;=)

 

Its not, if I treated my car clutch like my dirt bike clutch I'd probably ruin it in 10 minutes.

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Put the bars in the nutral position (In line with the forks). 

 

If you're riding off road you should be standing for the most part of the day. Anyway, whatever postion you ride in most. You want your wrists to be straight when you have your finges/finger on the levers.

You don't want your wrists bent up or down, you want them straight. Having them bent will just add to any ArmPump.

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Probably why I have the original clutch in my bike, I'm not riding around with my fingers on the lever. It's like driving around in your car with your foot riding on the clutch pedal. ;=)

Having your fingers on the clutch wouldn't burn out your clutch but no free play doesn't help

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Its not, if I treated my car clutch like my dirt bike clutch I'd probably ruin it in 10 minutes.

 

I do drive my car with one foot resting on the clutch.

 

If I drive an Auto, I'll have one foot resting on the brake and use both feet to drive.

 

Habit from Racing Karts. You need to be able to react quickly, you know, like when you have an accident, sooner you can brake or clutch, the better. Get what I'm saying?

 

In that exta second it takes to get your foot across to the brake or clutch. You could be Dead :naughty: .

 

Trees don't warn you before they jump out in front of you. Wanna react quickly? Be in a position to react  :thumbsup: .

 

EDIT: Sorry Bushy, quoted the wong post  :facepalm:

Edited by AddictedToBling
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