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How to treat a motor

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I've always wondered, is it better to ride at the top of the gear as in you don't need to shift yet but you're close to redline or lugging a motor, like riding in 5th but at 3rd gear speeds? I know how to treat a motor but out of these two I want to know which is worse.

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I reckon more rpm's would mean more wear sooner.

 

Lugging around in 5th but without a heavy load in my opinion is better.

 

Both scenarios probably have pros and cons, but are probably negligible.

 

I can see this turning into a "does a piston ever stop moving in a running engine" thread.

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being in the right gear is best...

 

lugging a little or over revving a little won't do much harm but I wouldn't want to do either too much

 

more rpm= more wear generally but you are better off being at a higher rpm in the right gear than a higher gear lugging the engine. I forget how exactly lugging the engine harms it but know it is not good. I think it has something to do with the way the main and/or rod bearings are loaded and possibly piston slap as well though don't quote me on that.

Edited by problem_child
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I agree, if the engine is running out of the power band (between peak torque and peak power, as I understand it), you should just change gear.  But I should think that when the engine is running slower than usual, there is less oil circulation as well, so it is quite possible that the engine could wear or get hot because of this.  Just a theory.

I would also agree with problem_child about the loading and unloading of the engine components.

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No oil pressure would kill an engine long before it caused an overheating problem.

 

Low rpm oil pressure would likley not be a problem for wear.

 

It takes very little oil to create a film for the moving parts to glide on each other; especially in roller bearing engines.

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Good points but this wasn't meant as I didn't know how to actually run a motor efficiently, just out of the two scenarios which would do more harm. As if 2 different new motors were ran for their whole lives with these two scenarios given which would have more wear?

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Lugging at high load may cause detonation. Otherwise, consider how much longer a piston lasts in a 450 vs 250f or a 300 vs a 125. Yeah the smaller engine may be in a higher state of tune, but the comparison is still valid. Wear goes up with RPM's.

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stahhp :lol:

 

I can't, everything around here is under water or rained out.   

 

 

I'm stuck inside and have cabin fever. :goofy:

 

 

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Im learning how to lug a motor more than running at max rpm coming from a 2 stroke. I do notice the suspension works better just weird hearing chain slapping aroud. Also i moved my suspension from my 2 stroke to my 450. Its set up for mx. Bad move it was super harsh on the 450.

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I've read some articles from race mechanics/ engineers. Four strokes in paticullar. Lugging REALLY hard loads con rod bearing badly. The trade off is piston /cylinder wear.

I don't think about any of it on a two stroke. Easy/cheap to repair so I do what ever suits my needs. They don't chug and bang like a thumper.

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Are we talking about a 2 stroke or 4 stroke? I wonder how much that would change peoples opinions

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4 stroke mainly, I never lugged my cr because well it's a 2 stroke but I find myself climbing hills in a higher gear kind of lugging it to keep the wheel spin down but I'm starting to think of the parts that would be affected from lugging it like maybe the clutch or rod bearings from having such a load on them.

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I've read some articles from race mechanics/ engineers. Four strokes in paticullar. Lugging REALLY hard loads con rod bearing badly. The trade off is piston /cylinder wear.

I don't think about any of it on a two stroke. Easy/cheap to repair so I do what ever suits my needs. They don't chug and bang like a thumper.

this is exactly the kind of answer I was looking for, sometimes I lug it to save some wear on the piston/cylinder but was concerned with what I'm trading off.

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Treat it as nice as possible. Talk to it before and after servicing it, maybe even spend some quality time after riding it and have a beer with it!!

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Lugging is not great because it takes the motor more time to spin up. But not shifting sounds worse to me. Unless your coming into a corner. But I hear the guys who think their fast in the local sand pit at croom riding around in 2nd gear on a new bike just revving the living sh!t out of it..

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