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tire grooving

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not sure if this helps anybody but just wanted to share my first attempt at tire grooving and the results

Thailand roads are extremely slippery with a fair amount of dust on them as such dot race/street tires don't work,a rain tire is the closest thing that works but its hard to find in sizes under 160. i decided to groove one of the local tires here which is a well know production race tire but doesn't flex enough for dusty roads. i just copied the pattern from a goldspeed ultra street. the results were amazing after i tested it.the grip was so much better and when the wheels spin under acceleration it was a much more controlled slide . it really opened my mind to how specific tread patterns suit specific roads

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Consider side wall sipping, it is a thin almost razor cut that gives more edges when turning.  Some tire stores offer this as a service to customers.

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i've never heard of siping the sidewall. would that effect the integrity of the tire. if you look closer at the outer edges you can see that i have siped them

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i've never heard of siping the sidewall. would that effect the integrity of the tire. if you look closer at the outer edges you can see that i have siped them

 

Thats a good job!!  I'm sure some of your gains in traction is from the tire heating up quicker due to the more siping. Being a race tire they are designed to work at the higher temps. of track speeds, of course on the road its difficult to get them to their optimum temp, but that siping must really help that, along with the more biting edges.  If you rode that hard on the track now, it would probably cook pretty quick.

 

I chased a buddy this summer along some forest service roads, he had a new 1190 adventure, the more road oriented one with tires that looked similar to that and i was suprised how much hook up he had, i had to work hard to keep up with him, power sliding my 50/50 tires all over the road. If i didn't do so much muddy trails, i'd try that type of tire, got some of those production race tires laying around.

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i've never heard of siping the sidewall. would that effect the integrity of the tire. if you look closer at the outer edges you can see that i have siped them

 

siping is awesome for rain and slick trails. look at the trials tires and they have deep sipes in each lug. 

 

have you looked into siping the center section ? 

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Speedway, flat track and midget drivers (no jokes pls), are often seen razorblading their tires.  They want sharper tread blocks and more edges for tire traction. 

I would limit the cut depth (1/8" - 3/16"), harder rubber will need heat (propane torch). 

 

http://pitstopusa.com/c-133695-sprint-car-open-wheel-sprint-car-parts-wheels-accessories-tire-siping-tools.html

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i bought this tire groover  on ebay

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ideal-Truck-Tire-Groover-Cutter-Heated-Grooving-Iron-4-Blades-Head-Sprint-Car-/201070474950?hash=item2ed0bbf6c6:g:b6oAAOSwEppUR~Pc&vxp=mtr

 

there is probably lots of different combinations when it comes to grooving but everything will depend on the type of surface you ride on. i don't think grooving would be of any benefit on well kept roads with really coarse bitumen. i used to ride a ktm690smc in Australia and on those roads i would have balls on the edges of the tire it was so harsh on them but an example of how slippery the roads are here in thailand is sometimes i can't even pull a wheelie in first gear because the back tire just spins. siping in the middle could be done and i would probably see even more traction with more siping on the edges but also i think everything will be a trade off with longevity. we get on average here about 4000klms out of a rear tire from road racing and 1500klms out of a wet tire from road racing. 

the blade i used is 4mm and i made it 4mm deep on a new tire but i think a 2mm blade with twice as many grooves would be more beneficial 

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I put a ton of siping cuts in tire for the winter also. The more cuts the more biting edges . I've taken tires that are outright dangerous to quite impressive on ice. Wear goes up though on that kind of cutting.

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I put a ton of siping cuts in tire for the winter also. The more cuts the more biting edges . I've taken tires that are outright dangerous to quite impressive on ice. Wear goes up though on that kind of cutting.

do you have any photos please?

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I'll post some when I get home , I use a multi tool with just a saw blade and cut in at all different angles around each lug , no big wide open cracks.

 

 

 

 

Edit for pics , Some of the first ones I did to see how it works , I have others starting with new tires in later years which works better.

 

DSCN0810_zpstyrn7vtc.jpg

DSCN0809_zpsreyxbdu3.jpg

Edited by jjktmrider
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I'll post some when I get home , I use a multi tool with just a saw blade and cut in at all different angles around each lug , no big wide open cracks.

 

 

 

 

Edit for pics , Some of the first ones I did to see how it works , I have others starting with new tires in later years which works better.

 

DSCN0810_zpstyrn7vtc.jpg

DSCN0809_zpsreyxbdu3.jpg

thats very subtle. goes to show how small things can make a difference

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yep , If you look at car tires , especially all season ones they have tons of those squiggly sipes . each one is a bite edge . Will work good on bare ground as well or in the wet . For pure predictable traction on dry asphalt I would expect the way the you did yours would be better , all those sipes may let go of traction suddenly , not ideal when in a fast corner leaned over.

 

All those cuts I did are fairly shallow ,1/8" max ,so the lugs don't start to rip or lay over easily , it's all it takes on ice , still prefer studs on the edge lugs as a "just-in-case " to stop sliding.

Edited by jjktmrider

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