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I had to stop and give somebody CPR during race yesterday.

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I rode a hare scramble yesterday.  The weather was very hot. There are about 200 bikes in the race session that I ride. My row of 30 bikes starts last, and I was keeping back towards the rear of the pack yesterday. About 4 miles into my first lap I noticed a rider and bike on the ground next to the trail. I doubled back to check on him. I started yelling to him, but he wasn't moving. I parked my bike in front of him, blocking the trail so he wouldn't get hit, then got off to help him.

He seemed to be unconscious, still tangled-up with his bike. He was face down and a bit twisted. I knew not to move him or turn his neck. A couple of riders even slower than me came by within a few seconds, and I sent them to fetch the medics. I knew he was in bad shape, and I yelled for help a few times in the direction of a course worker I had seen about 200 yards back. As I was trying to get a response from him, the worker showed-up and called for help on her phone. I can be quite loud, and the lady heard me.

I checked his pulse and felt nothing. So, then I rolled his head over and saw his lips were blue. It seemed to take forever to get his helmet off because the strap was so tight. His face was very pale. I pulled him out flat and started doing CPR. After about 3-5 minutes the head medic showed-up and took over the compressions while I continued the breathing. Soon, the whole medical crew got there and took over. They worked on him for about 15 minutes, with breathing tube, IV, and electro-shock while me and several others diverted traffic.

Despite all our efforts, the guy didn't make it. In retrospect, looking at the location and position of his bike and body, I think that rather than crashing, he had pulled-over then passed-out and fell down. Heart attack probably. He was 55 years old. We are a pretty close group of racers, but nobody knew this man. He had come there alone that day.

The medics patrol the course during the race, but unfortunately one had probably just passed him less than a minute before he went down. I know because the medic had just passed me one mile back.

This is the first time I ever had to give CPR. I never took an official course or anything, but I know how to read and it isn't rocket science. The medics said I did everything perfectly.

In practice that morning (about 2 hours earlier) another rider about 70 years old also had a heart attack. The medics saw him go down and did CPR immediately. He was revived and I hear he is doing well. Things like this are very uncommon in our organization. Neither of these were "racing accidents" - could have easily happened playing golf or mowing the lawn.

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Good for you checking on and helping a fellow rider above all else. This exemplifies the character of the off road rider.

I'm sad to hear he passed, but your efforts have not gone unnoticed. Hope he is in a better place.

Edited by Bricktop72
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Sorry to hear about this.  I am sure his family is extremely grateful for your efforts and care.

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I'm a MD and it sounds like you did everything perfectly despite not having the official training. The chances of saving someone that you found already down and pulseless are slim to none. Surviving cardiac arrest while admitted to the hospital having everything started immediately including the drugs to restart cardiac rhythm is less than 50% and only about 5% of those will ever leave the hospital. Great job man, you did everything you could. 

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This gave me cold chills multiple times while reading it. Good for you to stop and try to help. Idk you but i appreciate your actions.  :thumbsup:

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That was the most admirable thing I've read in quite awhile. You're the kind of person we need more of in our sport.

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We reference the importance of showing good sportsmanship quite often but this is another level entirely, this is more of a lesson in humanity. While shrouded in sadness and awe immediately, there are some positive takeaways that will eventually emerge. First, the man passed doing something that he obviously enjoyed and secondly the care, effort and concern you displayed for a complete stranger was an example for us all. Very nice job, Sir.

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We reference the importance of showing good sportsmanship quite often but this is another level entirely, this is more of a lesson in humanity. While shrouded in sadness and awe immediately, there are some positive takeaways that will eventually emerge. First, the man passed doing something that he obviously enjoyed and secondly the care, effort and concern you displayed for a complete stranger was an example for us all. Very nice job, Sir.

+1

I could not of said it better.

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