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Thinking of getting a harbor freight trailer...read this!

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Hey, here is my experience with the harbor freight 4 x 8 trailer that you have to put together yourself...

1.) Cost from the store with tax: $256

Total assembly time: About 4 days (not full days, but maybe like 3 hours per day)

- Wheel bearings must be repacked

- A basic understanding of wire splicing required in running the wiring

- A T-square should be used when putting the frame together

- Read the directions VERY CAREFULLY before tightening the bolts, because it's very easy to put a piece on backwards/upside down/wrong piece. I f***ed up a few times only to realize my mistake a few steps later when stuff wasn't lining up the way it should

- It's like putting together a piece of IKEA furniture...take your time before tightening the s*** out of any bolts, because it's very easy to make simple mistakes, which result in you needing to undo the bolts and fix your error(s).

2.) Cost of plywood/mounting bolts/straps/and O-bolts: $85

3.) Cost of "enhanced inspection" (which is required in my state for trailers that you put together yourself): $212

4.) Cost of Registration/title creation: $180

5) Cost of miscellaneous tools needed to put it together (torque wrench, grease gun, grease, rubber mallet, etc...): $60

5) Total cost: ~$800

If you already have all the necessary tools, bolts, and plywood laying around, then the total cost would be closer to $700. However, the important thing to note is that it is much more then just $250, which is the cost of just the unassembled trailer.

After it was assembled with the plywood, this is where the real fun began...

- The castor wheels broke off, making it impossible to "fold up and roll into storage", which is the main reason I chose to buy this trailer in the first place. It was simply too heavy, awkwardly shaped, and lacking of castor wheels to be able to roll into my double doored basement, which has a 6" lip that must be overcome in order to get into (not a problem for my quad and dirtbike, but a major problem for an extremely heavy and awkwardly shaped trailer that has cheap 1" castor wheels, two of which broke off). Therefore, I was forced to keep it outside in my driveway (which is the main reason that I didn't just buy a regular 5x8 landscaping trailer.

- After putting the plywood onto the trailer, it doesn't fold up anymore. It almost folds up, but not quite. When it's on its 'side' (which means it's upright on its cheap castor wheels, ready to be rolled into storage), it wants to unfold and come crashing down due to the weight of it. If you take your hand off of the trailer for even one second, it will immediately unfold and come crashing down causing a bent license plate and cracked tail light. If you intend to keep this thing folded, while in the upright position, you better have some rope or straps that will keep it folded (unfortunately I didnt).

- In order to get the trailer on its side, onto the cheap 1" castor wheels, it requires somewhat of a Herculean effort. If you are a relatively strong dude, then you should be okay. However, after a full day of riding...your energy levels may be low, and...well, let's just say you may be cursing and hitting stuff a lot if you have to do this by yourself.

- The coupler (the part that you connect to the ball on your trailer hitch) is the biggest piece of junk I've ever seen in my life. In order to get in onto the ball, you must first connect the safety chains to your trailer hitch (I have a sloped driveway, so this was an absolute must). You then must have a hammer or crowbar ready. Next, you must lay on your back and hold the weight of the trailer up with one hand, while you beat on the coupler with the hammer/crowbar until the opening in large enough to fit over the 1 7/8" trailer ball. You'd think that the lever on the coupler would do this, but it actually doesn't. A hammer or crowbar, and lots of yelling and cursing is required (it doesn't mention that in the directions).

- Loading the bike or quad onto the trailer sucks a**! At first glance, you may think "cool, the bed of the trailer also doubles as a ramp". However, what you don't know is that the bed of the trailer wants to be FLAT (not in the ramped position). What this means is that you must find a way to keep the bed in the ramped position, so you can jump on your bike or quad and drive it up onto the ramp. I figured out that I could accomplish this feat by shoving a 2 x 4 piece of wood onto the trailer, underneath the bed, forcing the bed to stay in the "loading position". Next, I jump onto my quad/bike and drive it up to the bed such that just the front wheel is on the ramp. Next, I can remove the 2 x 4 piece of wood since the weight of the bike is holding it in position now. Next, I can jump on the bike/quad, and ride it up the ramp causing it to go flat again. Voila, bike loaded!

- There are no sidewalls, so you'd better strap that thing down good!

- Unloading is a bit easier, but still a gigantic pain In the a**. You can either open up the coupler now with a hammer/crowbar, or you can just do that next time you want to go out riding. Just realize, that you will be beating that piece of s*** coupler with a hammer sometime between now and your next ride in order to get it attached to the trailer hitch ball.

- Now it's time to fold it up and store it. Unfortunately, after my first use, I had only 1/2 of the amount of castor wheels that I started with, a cracked tail light, a bent license plate, and zero energy left. So it just stayed out in my driveway. I secretly prayed to God that someone would come along and steal this trailer while I wasn't looking, but unfortunately it was still there the next day :(.

- I ended up giving the trailer away to my cousin after only 1 use. I figured that I'd rather have that piece of s*** out of my life altogether, then to ever have to deal with it again. I considered it to be equivalent to a bad gambling loss. I'm not a big gambler, but I have lost several hundred dollars on more then one occasion from gambling. Purchasing this trailer felt about the same.

- Don't even get me started about the pinched wiring issues that you are going to encounter the first time you go to fold the trailer up. Let's just say you'd better have your soldering iron and a bunch of electrical tape ready to go.

- The next time I went out riding, I borrowed my buddies 5 x 8 landscaping trailer, and it was a very euphoric experience. The trailer connected to my hitch in about 1 second. The bike loaded onto the trailer in about 10 seconds...and about 4 minutes later, I was strapped down and ready to roll. Oh it was so nice.

My advice: If you are looking to buy a trailer to haul your bike or quad, go to Lowes, and buy a 5x8 landscaping trailer for $700. You'll end up spending the same exact amount of money, and you'll be getting a WAY better trailer that's much easier to deal with. No, it won't fold up (but then again, that feature was lost for me after the plywood was added and the castor wheels broke off from the HF trailer).

Phew...glad I got that off my chest :).

Edited by Irishman301

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The cost of this trailer can vary a LOT depending on where you live. I am in no way considering buying this trailer, but if I were, this is what my costs would be like.

 

1.) Cost from the store (no sales tax in OR): $200

2.) Cost of plywood/mounting bolts/straps (what are the straps for?) /and O-bolts (this seems a bit high to me, probably due to your sales tax, but I'll leave it as is): $85

3.) Cost of "enhanced inspection" (No inspection required for small utility trailers in OR): $0

4.) Cost of Registration/title creation (No registration for small utility trailers required in OR): $0

5) Cost of miscellaneous tools needed to put it together (Pretty standard tools that I have): $0

5) Total cost: ~$285 (actual would probably be closer to $250 with no sales tax on the misc. materials)

Edited by woods-rider

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Yeah, not so sure I'd buy a 4X8 trailer for it's "folding" ability.....Just saying. You can find 4X7 landscaping trailers on sale for $450 and are a much better buy. 

When the trailer is assembled right and w/o the need to fold it, they are pretty nice trailers for haulinga couple bikes. No way would I put 1500# of anything that I liked on it. I'm building my trailer from scratch (someday when I get around to finishing it) and it will cost the same as a HF trailer, but be a little more solid (bolted together) and designed for me. 

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Hey, here is my experience with the harbor freight 4 x 8 trailer that you have to put together yourself...

1.) Cost from the store with tax: $256

Total assembly time: About 4 days (not full days, but maybe like 3 hours per day)

- Wheel bearings must be repacked

- A basic understanding of wire splicing required in running the wiring

- A T-square should be used when putting the frame together

- Read the directions VERY CAREFULLY before tightening the bolts, because it's very easy to put a piece on backwards/upside down/wrong piece. I f***ed up a few times only to realize my mistake a few steps later when stuff wasn't lining up the way it should

- It's like putting together a piece of IKEA furniture...take your time before tightening the s*** out of any bolts, because it's very easy to make simple mistakes, which result in you needing to undo the bolts and fix your error(s).

2.) Cost of plywood/mounting bolts/straps/and O-bolts: $85

3.) Cost of "enhanced inspection" (which is required in my state for trailers that you put together yourself): $212

4.) Cost of Registration/title creation: $180

5) Cost of miscellaneous tools needed to put it together (torque wrench, grease gun, grease, rubber mallet, etc...): $60

5) Total cost: ~$800

If you already have all the necessary tools, bolts, and plywood laying around, then the total cost would be closer to $700. However, the important thing to note is that it is much more then just $250, which is the cost of just the unassembled trailer.

After it was assembled with the plywood, this is where the real fun began...

- The castor wheels broke off, making it impossible to "fold up and roll into storage", which is the main reason I chose to buy this trailer in the first place. It was simply too heavy, awkwardly shaped, and lacking of castor wheels to be able to roll into my double doored basement, which has a 6" lip that must be overcome in order to get into (not a problem for my quad and dirtbike, but a major problem for an extremely heavy and awkwardly shaped trailer that has cheap 1" castor wheels, two of which broke off). Therefore, I was forced to keep it outside in my driveway (which is the main reason that I didn't just buy a regular 5x8 landscaping trailer.

- After putting the plywood onto the trailer, it doesn't fold up anymore. It almost folds up, but not quite. When it's on its 'side' (which means it's upright on its cheap castor wheels, ready to be rolled into storage), it wants to unfold and come crashing down due to the weight of it. If you take your hand off of the trailer for even one second, it will immediately unfold and come crashing down causing a bent license plate and cracked tail light. If you intend to keep this thing folded, while in the upright position, you better have some rope or straps that will keep it folded (unfortunately I didnt).

- In order to get the trailer on its side, onto the cheap 1" castor wheels, it requires somewhat of a Herculean effort. If you are a relatively strong dude, then you should be okay. However, after a full day of riding...your energy levels may be low, and...well, let's just say you may be cursing and hitting stuff a lot if you have to do this by yourself.

- The coupler (the part that you connect to the ball on your trailer hitch) is the biggest piece of junk I've ever seen in my life. In order to get in onto the ball, you must first connect the safety chains to your trailer hitch (I have a sloped driveway, so this was an absolute must). You then must have a hammer or crowbar ready. Next, you must lay on your back and hold the weight of the trailer up with one hand, while you beat on the coupler with the hammer/crowbar until the opening in large enough to fit over the 1 7/8" trailer ball. You'd think that the lever on the coupler would do this, but it actually doesn't. A hammer or crowbar, and lots of yelling and cursing is required (it doesn't mention that in the directions).

- Loading the bike or quad onto the trailer sucks a**! At first glance, you may think "cool, the bed of the trailer also doubles as a ramp". However, what you don't know is that the bed of the trailer wants to be FLAT (not in the ramped position). What this means is that you must find a way to keep the bed in the ramped position, so you can jump on your bike or quad and drive it up onto the ramp. I figured out that I could accomplish this feat by shoving a 2 x 4 piece of wood onto the trailer, underneath the bed, forcing the bed to stay in the "loading position". Next, I jump onto my quad/bike and drive it up to the bed such that just the front wheel is on the ramp. Next, I can remove the 2 x 4 piece of wood since the weight of the bike is holding it in position now. Next, I can jump on the bike/quad, and ride it up the ramp causing it to go flat again. Voila, bike loaded!

- There are no sidewalls, so you'd better strap that thing down good!

- Unloading is a bit easier, but still a gigantic pain In the a**. You can either open up the coupler now with a hammer/crowbar, or you can just do that next time you want to go out riding. Just realize, that you will be beating that piece of s*** coupler with a hammer sometime between now and your next ride in order to get it attached to the trailer hitch ball.

- Now it's time to fold it up and store it. Unfortunately, after my first use, I had only 1/2 of the amount of castor wheels that I started with, a cracked tail light, a bent license plate, and zero energy left. So it just stayed out in my driveway. I secretly prayed to God that someone would come along and steal this trailer while I wasn't looking, but unfortunately it was still there the next day :(.

- I ended up giving the trailer away to my cousin after only 1 use. I figured that I'd rather have that piece of s*** out of my life altogether, then to ever have to deal with it again. I considered it to be equivalent to a bad gambling loss. I'm not a big gambler, but I have lost several hundred dollars on more then one occasion from gambling. Purchasing this trailer felt about the same.

- Don't even get me started about the pinched wiring issues that you are going to encounter the first time you go to fold the trailer up. Let's just say you'd better have your soldering iron and a bunch of electrical tape ready to go.

- The next time I went out riding, I borrowed my buddies 5 x 8 landscaping trailer, and it was a very euphoric experience. The trailer connected to my hitch in about 1 second. The bike loaded onto the trailer in about 10 seconds...and about 4 minutes later, I was strapped down and ready to roll. Oh it was so nice.

My advice: If you are looking to buy a trailer to haul your bike or quad, go to Lowes, and buy a 5x8 landscaping trailer for $700. You'll end up spending the same exact amount of money, and you'll be getting a WAY better trailer that's much easier to deal with. No, it won't fold up (but then again, that feature was lost for me after the plywood was added and the castor wheels broke off from the HF trailer).

Phew...glad I got that off my chest :).

I think a lot of us could learn from your experience. Couldn't help it, but I did laugh a lot while I read this.

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I would never buy the folding version either... I looked into getting one but since moved away in favor of a enclosed 6x12 trailer which I plan to convert to a mini toy hauler/camper 

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- The castor wheels broke off, making it impossible to "fold up and roll into storage", which is the main reason I chose to buy this trailer in the first place. It was simply too heavy, awkwardly shaped, and lacking of castor wheels to be able to roll into my double doored basement, which has a 6" lip that must be overcome in order to get into (not a problem for my quad and dirtbike, but a major problem for an extremely heavy and awkwardly shaped trailer that has cheap 1" castor wheels, two of which broke off). Therefore, I was forced to keep it outside in my driveway (which is the main reason that I didn't just buy a regular 5x8 landscaping trailer.

Valid point about the castors. Didn't really need a full paragraph since this is well known. You can get some decent castors fairly cheap.

- After putting the plywood onto the trailer, it doesn't fold up anymore. It almost folds up, but not quite. When it's on its 'side' (which means it's upright on its cheap castor wheels, ready to be rolled into storage), it wants to unfold and come crashing down due to the weight of it. If you take your hand off of the trailer for even one second, it will immediately unfold and come crashing down causing a bent license plate and cracked tail light. If you intend to keep this thing folded, while in the upright position, you better have some rope or straps that will keep it folded (unfortunately I didnt).

You honestly thought gravity would stop working when you folded up your trailer? It real simple. Run a strap through the stake pockets.

- In order to get the trailer on its side, onto the cheap 1" castor wheels, it requires somewhat of a Herculean effort. If you are a relatively strong dude, then you should be okay. However, after a full day of riding...your energy levels may be low, and...well, let's just say you may be cursing and hitting stuff a lot if you have to do this by yourself.

It can be a bitch sometimes. But when you need space in the garage...

- The coupler (the part that you connect to the ball on your trailer hitch) is the biggest piece of junk I've ever seen in my life. In order to get in onto the ball, you must first connect the safety chains to your trailer hitch (I have a sloped driveway, so this was an absolute must). You then must have a hammer or crowbar ready. Next, you must lay on your back and hold the weight of the trailer up with one hand, while you beat on the coupler with the hammer/crowbar until the opening in large enough to fit over the 1 7/8" trailer ball. You'd think that the lever on the coupler would do this, but it actually doesn't. A hammer or crowbar, and lots of yelling and cursing is required (it doesn't mention that in the directions).

You didn't adjust the coupler properly, assuming you were actually using a 1 7/8 ball. All couplers have an adjuster on the underside.

- Loading the bike or quad onto the trailer sucks a**! At first glance, you may think "cool, the bed of the trailer also doubles as a ramp". However, what you don't know is that the bed of the trailer wants to be FLAT (not in the ramped position). What this means is that you must find a way to keep the bed in the ramped position, so you can jump on your bike or quad and drive it up onto the ramp. I figured out that I could accomplish this feat by shoving a 2 x 4 piece of wood onto the trailer, underneath the bed, forcing the bed to stay in the "loading position". Next, I jump onto my quad/bike and drive it up to the bed such that just the front wheel is on the ramp. Next, I can remove the 2 x 4 piece of wood since the weight of the bike is holding it in position now. Next, I can jump on the bike/quad, and ride it up the ramp causing it to go flat again. Voila, bike loaded!

Tighten the bolts where the tongue attaches to the deck a little more to give some resistance.

- There are no sidewalls, so you'd better strap that thing down good!

You should always strap things down well. Also, you can make sidewalls or buy a kit. That's why the stake pockets are there.

- Don't even get me started about the pinched wiring issues that you are going to encounter the first time you go to fold the trailer up. Let's just say you'd better have your soldering iron and a bunch of electrical tape ready to go.

Some wire loom and a little thought would prevent this. I happened to add a 4 pin connector at the folding joint that I disconnect before folding.

My advice: If you are looking to buy a trailer to haul your bike or quad, go to Lowes, and buy a 5x8 landscaping trailer for $700. You'll end up spending the same exact amount of money, and you'll be getting a WAY better trailer that's much easier to deal with. No, it won't fold up (but then again, that feature was lost for me after the plywood was added and the castor wheels broke off from the HF trailer).

Agree. A $700 Lowe's trailer is a great option if you don't want to do some assembly work, put any thought into how things are going to work, have plenty of room, and don't live in a townhouse where you can't have things like that in your driveway.

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You didn't adjust the coupler properly, assuming you were actually using a 1 7/8 ball. All couplers have an adjuster on the underside.

Yes I did adjust it...multiple times. I also took it apart multiple times trying to figure out why you only get one use at a time with it, before having to f*** with it so it will go back over the ball the next time. I also had my neighbor look at it who deals in buying/fixing/selling used bikes. We both agreed it was just a crappy coupler (maybe I got a defective one, or it was missing a piece or something...all I know is it didn't work right). A new one that doesn't suck could be purchased for about $70 though, so I guess that issue could be fixed too if you felt like spending some extra money.

Point being, for $800 I got a crappy trailer that was a major hassle. I wish I would have spent that $800 on a regular 5 x 8 landscaping trailer.

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Hey, here is my experience with the harbor freight 4 x 8 trailer that you have to put together yourself...

1.) Cost from the store with tax: $256

Total assembly time: About 4 days (not full days, but maybe like 3 hours per day)

- Wheel bearings must be repacked

- A basic understanding of wire splicing required in running the wiring

- A T-square should be used when putting the frame together

- Read the directions VERY CAREFULLY before tightening the bolts, because it's very easy to put a piece on backwards/upside down/wrong piece. I f***ed up a few times only to realize my mistake a few steps later when stuff wasn't lining up the way it should

- It's like putting together a piece of IKEA furniture...take your time before tightening the s*** out of any bolts, because it's very easy to make simple mistakes, which result in you needing to undo the bolts and fix your error(s).

2.) Cost of plywood/mounting bolts/straps/and O-bolts: $85

3.) Cost of "enhanced inspection" (which is required in my state for trailers that you put together yourself): $212

4.) Cost of Registration/title creation: $180

5) Cost of miscellaneous tools needed to put it together (torque wrench, grease gun, grease, rubber mallet, etc...): $60

5) Total cost: ~$800

If you already have all the necessary tools, bolts, and plywood laying around, then the total cost would be closer to $700. However, the important thing to note is that it is much more then just $250, which is the cost of just the unassembled trailer.

After it was assembled with the plywood, this is where the real fun began...

- The castor wheels broke off, making it impossible to "fold up and roll into storage", which is the main reason I chose to buy this trailer in the first place. It was simply too heavy, awkwardly shaped, and lacking of castor wheels to be able to roll into my double doored basement, which has a 6" lip that must be overcome in order to get into (not a problem for my quad and dirtbike, but a major problem for an extremely heavy and awkwardly shaped trailer that has cheap 1" castor wheels, two of which broke off). Therefore, I was forced to keep it outside in my driveway (which is the main reason that I didn't just buy a regular 5x8 landscaping trailer.

- After putting the plywood onto the trailer, it doesn't fold up anymore. It almost folds up, but not quite. When it's on its 'side' (which means it's upright on its cheap castor wheels, ready to be rolled into storage), it wants to unfold and come crashing down due to the weight of it. If you take your hand off of the trailer for even one second, it will immediately unfold and come crashing down causing a bent license plate and cracked tail light. If you intend to keep this thing folded, while in the upright position, you better have some rope or straps that will keep it folded (unfortunately I didnt).

- In order to get the trailer on its side, onto the cheap 1" castor wheels, it requires somewhat of a Herculean effort. If you are a relatively strong dude, then you should be okay. However, after a full day of riding...your energy levels may be low, and...well, let's just say you may be cursing and hitting stuff a lot if you have to do this by yourself.

- The coupler (the part that you connect to the ball on your trailer hitch) is the biggest piece of junk I've ever seen in my life. In order to get in onto the ball, you must first connect the safety chains to your trailer hitch (I have a sloped driveway, so this was an absolute must). You then must have a hammer or crowbar ready. Next, you must lay on your back and hold the weight of the trailer up with one hand, while you beat on the coupler with the hammer/crowbar until the opening in large enough to fit over the 1 7/8" trailer ball. You'd think that the lever on the coupler would do this, but it actually doesn't. A hammer or crowbar, and lots of yelling and cursing is required (it doesn't mention that in the directions).

- Loading the bike or quad onto the trailer sucks a**! At first glance, you may think "cool, the bed of the trailer also doubles as a ramp". However, what you don't know is that the bed of the trailer wants to be FLAT (not in the ramped position). What this means is that you must find a way to keep the bed in the ramped position, so you can jump on your bike or quad and drive it up onto the ramp. I figured out that I could accomplish this feat by shoving a 2 x 4 piece of wood onto the trailer, underneath the bed, forcing the bed to stay in the "loading position". Next, I jump onto my quad/bike and drive it up to the bed such that just the front wheel is on the ramp. Next, I can remove the 2 x 4 piece of wood since the weight of the bike is holding it in position now. Next, I can jump on the bike/quad, and ride it up the ramp causing it to go flat again. Voila, bike loaded!

- There are no sidewalls, so you'd better strap that thing down good!

- Unloading is a bit easier, but still a gigantic pain In the a**. You can either open up the coupler now with a hammer/crowbar, or you can just do that next time you want to go out riding. Just realize, that you will be beating that piece of s*** coupler with a hammer sometime between now and your next ride in order to get it attached to the trailer hitch ball.

- Now it's time to fold it up and store it. Unfortunately, after my first use, I had only 1/2 of the amount of castor wheels that I started with, a cracked tail light, a bent license plate, and zero energy left. So it just stayed out in my driveway. I secretly prayed to God that someone would come along and steal this trailer while I wasn't looking, but unfortunately it was still there the next day :(.

- I ended up giving the trailer away to my cousin after only 1 use. I figured that I'd rather have that piece of s*** out of my life altogether, then to ever have to deal with it again. I considered it to be equivalent to a bad gambling loss. I'm not a big gambler, but I have lost several hundred dollars on more then one occasion from gambling. Purchasing this trailer felt about the same.

- Don't even get me started about the pinched wiring issues that you are going to encounter the first time you go to fold the trailer up. Let's just say you'd better have your soldering iron and a bunch of electrical tape ready to go.

- The next time I went out riding, I borrowed my buddies 5 x 8 landscaping trailer, and it was a very euphoric experience. The trailer connected to my hitch in about 1 second. The bike loaded onto the trailer in about 10 seconds...and about 4 minutes later, I was strapped down and ready to roll. Oh it was so nice.

My advice: If you are looking to buy a trailer to haul your bike or quad, go to Lowes, and buy a 5x8 landscaping trailer for $700. You'll end up spending the same exact amount of money, and you'll be getting a WAY better trailer that's much easier to deal with. No, it won't fold up (but then again, that feature was lost for me after the plywood was added and the castor wheels broke off from the HF trailer).

Phew...glad I got that off my chest :).

 

thats a fine piece of writing man... :smirk:

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Two Words: Harbor Freight

 

Some of the their cheapo tools are OK, being you may only use them a dozen times in your life and they may survive that long. (I've bought bearing splitters and pulley pullers, decent quality. I got free screwdrivers, I would not ever use them except to pry open paint cans, assuming they do not bend)

Some of the stuff they sell is such total crap that the box is more valuable than the contents.

Some of the stuff is actually a good deal. I recently bought a 'Portable Garage'. Same brand as Northern Tool, made by ShelterLogic. Difference is that it is a smaller than than NT or SH. 10' X 17', which is fine for my use and larger (longer) would not of fit.

 

I talked to a nice guy at HF customer service. Honest fellow. Told me while they do stand behind the stuff they sell, you have to return it to get it 'fixed'. They do not send you 'the part' (ShelterLogic does sell individual parts-AhHa!). So for the OP to of gotten his casters replaced, he'd of had to return the entire trailer, possibly disassembled and re-assembled a new one.

 

For me, I'd only consider a name brand trailer (cargo and risk being too high), ready to go, plated by the seller. A lot of time, when you do a large-ish project and try to cheap out doing it, any possible savings get nickeled and dimed away.

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Yes I did adjust it...multiple times. I also took it apart multiple times trying to figure out why you only get one use at a time with it, before having to f*** with it so it will go back over the ball the next time. I also had my neighbor look at it who deals in buying/fixing/selling used bikes. We both agreed it was just a crappy coupler (maybe I got a defective one, or it was missing a piece or something...all I know is it didn't work right). A new one that doesn't suck could be purchased for about $70 though, so I guess that issue could be fixed too if you felt like spending some extra money.

Point being, for $800 I got a crappy trailer that was a major hassle. I wish I would have spent that $800 on a regular 5 x 8 landscaping trailer.

 

$70 ???

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-inch-x-2-1-2-half-inch-ball-coupler-94771.html

 

Or you can spend $4 more and not use the dreaded Harbor Freight again.

 

https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Coupler/Husky/HT87075.html

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Two Words: Harbor Freight

...

For me, I'd only consider a name brand trailer (cargo and risk being too high), ready to go, plated by the seller. A lot of time, when you do a large-ish project and try to cheap out doing it, any possible savings get nickeled and dimed away.

What name brand FOLDING trailer would you recommend? A Bulldog that costs $2100 or a Kendon for $2700?

I can buy a used Ford Ranger in that price range and just haul the bike in that.

My $300 Harbor Freight has nickled and dimed me to the tune of maybe $200 from adding personalized mount points and replacing tail lights that get hit by rocks.

I'd still have enought left to buy a Rangrt:p

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Irishman, your story is a bummer. Sorry to hear you had problems. My experience with a Harbor Fright trailer is much better than yours.

Two years ago, on a road trip to Southern California (I live in Oregon), I found this honda quad for sale in Turlock (central CA) while surfing craigslist. It had only 240 miles on it, and was loaded with accessories, for a great price.

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Problem was, when I travel, I like to carry my street-legal CRF250x with me on my SUV's bumper hitch carrier (a Harbor Fright unit).

The quad deal was too good to pass up. I paid the guy for the quad (in Turlock), left it there and drove down to Hollywood to visit the friends.

While in LA, I went to Harbor Fright and bought a trailer kit, and the tools to put it together in my friends driveway.

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It took a couple hours to put it together. A pretty simple job.

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After having supper with the friends, my wife drove the car w/trailer to Home Depot while I followed on my street-legal dirtbike, where I bought a sheet of plywood (about $40, I think), a cordless drill, some bolts, and installed the plywood sheet in the Home Depot parking lot. I then mounted the hitch mount bike carrier onto the front of the trailer...

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A couple of days later, when driving back home to Oregon, we stopped in Turlock to pick up the quad...

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The return trip went well, with great weather. Here we're stopping for gas in Shasta City...

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When we got home, I removed the plywood sheet, primered it, and put a sheet of aluminum diamond plate on top. I use this trailer around my ranch daily, and LOVE IT. I have 12 inch removable sides on it now.

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As was mentioned by an Oregon resident earlier, there is no licensing fee, registration, or any other red tape on trailers under 2000 lbs in Oregon. Lucky us!

Randy

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Some people aren't cut out to be do it yourselfef's

The harbor freight trailer is what many use on TBTTT to build customs on.

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Some people aren't cut out to be do it yourselfef's

The harbor freight trailer is what many use on TBTTT to build customs on.

Nah, I have always been able to put stuff together just fine. I even put this trailer together just fine. That wasn't the problem...

The problem was that once it was put together it was the biggest headache ever...didn't fold properly, unable to roll on castors, P.O.S. coupler, enhanced inspection/weight certificate requirements in order to get a tag for it, etc...

Good to see that others have had a better experience then me!

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Nah, I have always been able to put stuff together just fine. I even put this trailer together just fine. That wasn't the problem...

The problem was that once it was put together it was the biggest headache ever...didn't fold properly, unable to roll on castors, P.O.S. coupler, enhanced inspection/weight certificate requirements in order to get a tag for it, etc...

Good to see that others have had a better experience then me!

 

You've always been able to put things together just fine, yet you needed spend $60 on miscellaneous tools that every DIYer should have? All you need is a socket set, 17 and 15mm wrenches, and a pair of pliers. My wife had those kinds of tools when I met her. You don't even need a grease gun if you know how to pack bearings. And good luck using a torque wrench on the nylock nuts. 

 

Do you work for Lowes or something? Seriously. Your OP reads like an add or smear campain

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You've always been able to put things together just fine, yet you needed spend $60 on miscellaneous tools that every DIYer should have? All you need is a socket set, 17 and 15mm wrenches, and a pair of pliers. My wife had those kinds of tools when I met her. You don't even need a grease gun if you know how to pack bearings. And good luck using a torque wrench on the nylock nuts.

Do you work for Lowes or something? Seriously. Your OP reads like an add or smear campain

$80 was the cost for plywood, O-bolts, mounting bolts/nuts/washers for the plywood, straps, grease gun, and other various things that I didn't just have laying around.

What really amazes me is how defensive you are over this trailer. I personally think that it's a piece of crap, and I'm sharing my reasons why I think so. But for some reason my opinion is causing you to throw back handed insults at me, who is really just some random stranger on the Internet.

Interesting.

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