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Help turning on trails and burms

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I was out riding AZ trails and I have a hard time doing 90 degree turns while riding fast. Do I lean the bike into the turn and put weight on my outside or inside foot? And on burms do I downshift and lean up on the bike with my foot out. Any tips to doing those faster. Thanks

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Always weight the outside peg on turns. Thing I notice most people do when they have trouble with turns is braking too long and/or getting on the gas too late. Should be off the brake around 1/3 into the turn, the rest should be on the gas.

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Sitting or standing? Totally different technique. Sitting:  Weight forwards (nards on the gas cap), insisde foot out and forward, weight outside peg and drag front brake through the corner.  Standing: weight the inside peg, lean forward (very little weight/pull on hands).

 

Both techniques you'll want to have the bike leaning into the corner farther than your body. 

 

Which one to use depends on the radius of the turn and the speed through it.  Tighter, bermed turns I'll sit (especially one after another), everything else, stand.

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How much weight on the outside peg? And when, if ever, do you grip the fuel tank? I'm needing help with my tight turns at high speeds. Need more control and I'm talking about woods switchbacks and non banked turns mostly. I'm tall and fining the right balance of bar height and leg posture is hard. I've been doing leg presses and other exercises to strengthen my legs as I feel way to tall and have to bend my legs excessively. This puts my feet in a steep downward slant though and makes them target for obstructions especially on the short XR2.5. It also makes it really hard to shift or use the back brake because I have to lift my entire leg to use the controls. I'm going to try a tall seat foam to see if that helps with transitioning from standing to sitting. I am running 3 inch bar mounts and woods bend bars now and that has helped some.

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To apply the most amount of weight possible, I try to hover just off the seat when I need turning traction the most, usually entry in and mid-corner. So I look like I'm sitting, but not totally. Then when ready to power out I'll kinda squat down on the seat for rear wheel traction. I only do this for tighter turns, say 60-70 degrees or more. I try to stand for everything else until I get tired, then sit and rest for a minute and then resume standing if possible. You'll learn to pace yourself with time, and I'm sure being tall makes it harder to stand in attack mode. For standing turns I lean my head ahead of the number plate to keep the front gripping and control he bike rotation with the gas.

Also, I stand on the balls of my feet. Not only will it keep my toes clear of the ground, but it applies better weight to the peg and keeps me more agile on the bike for quick direction changes. When I need the brake I give it a quick stab(I only really use it for a quick slide or a panic stop going straight), and for shifting I stopped pivoting my foot on the peg and learned to just lift my whole boot up. Even with my torque-less 125, I'm far faster pulling a gear higher and using the clutch, and the longer I ride the more this is applicable. So you being on an XR will probably benefit from this even more. The fast woods dudes always seem to say stay smooth above all else, so I stopped trying to roost every corner. Seems to be working so far for me.

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Always weight the outside peg on turns. Thing I notice most people do when they have trouble with turns is braking too long and/or getting on the gas too late. Should be off the brake around going into the turn, you should be on the gas though the turn.

Fixed

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