Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

How much snow can my bike go threw

Recommended Posts

Basically once the snow is so deep the bike starts floating on the skid plate and the studded tires don't touch the ground.

 

If it's super cold and the snow is really light and fluffy, it might take 3 feet before it packs down for the above to happen. If it's just cold enough to snow and the snow is super wet and dense and does pack down much, then less.

 

It is FUN riding with studded tires in the snow and I've seen some good videos here showing this if you search studded tires or maybe some will post a vid.

Edited by filterx
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A foot deep is about it. Any deeper and the snow tends to push and build up causing the bike to loose traction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Studs are for ice, they do nothing in snow.

Completely wrong, Studs make a huge difference in snow, they penetrate in to the base layers or ground, and are nearly required on packed snow. Trust me I've been riding snow for years.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Completely wrong, Studs make a huge difference in snow, they penetrate in to the base layers or ground, and are nearly required on packed snow. Trust me I've been riding snow for years.

 

Only if they are able to bite into a hard surface. Then you are riding on hard ground or ice and merely 'through' snow. Pure snow, they do nothing. It goes back to previous posts, if the snow is too deep, you are not going anywhere. If you can get moving you can ride on top. Studs will not make a difference.

 

I rode in snow a lot when I was younger and had something called 'reflexes'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Only if they are able to bite into a hard surface. Then you are riding on hard ground or ice and merely 'through' snow. Pure snow, they do nothing. It goes back to previous posts, if the snow is too deep, you are not going anywhere. If you can get moving you can ride on top. Studs will not make a difference.

 

I rode in snow a lot when I was younger and had something called 'reflexes'.

Still Wrong, On old thawed then hard frozen snow (common spring condition) with studs you can get around surprisingly well without ever digging to the ground or ice If its hard enough to stay on top of the studs will be gaining you tons of traction.  In other conditions your tires aren't digging down to ice or the ground but simply getting traction from packing down and piercing through the packed layer that was just created by the tire. "studs do nothing in snow" is one of the dumbest statements I have heard on this site.

 

Do you even realize you are arguing with someone from Alaska?

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just the fact that you go by Wild Alaskan has me believing you when it comes to riding in/on snow.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still Wrong, On old thawed then hard frozen snow (common spring condition) with studs you can get around surprisingly well without ever digging to the ground or ice If its hard enough to stay on top of the studs will be gaining you tons of traction.  In other conditions your tires aren't digging down to ice or the ground but simply getting traction from packing down and piercing through the packed layer that was just created by the tire. "studs do nothing in snow" is one of the dumbest statements I have heard on this site.

 

Do you even realize you are arguing with someone from Alaska?

I am not arguing. I am sorry if you feel like you must do so to make a point that you missed. You have no idea where I have lived or all my experience. I have almost ten years living in NH, not Alaska but we had snow from Sept., To April, in places over 20' deep from drifting. In 20' of drifted snow,  even ice racing spike will do nothing.

 

You find it necessary to talk of snow (in only the spring, apparently), that then melts and refreezes (most call that ice) as if it were snow. It is not. Ride in two feet or fresh snow (not melt and refreeze packed snowmobile tracks) and honestly say that studs make any difference at all.

 

 

Studs are great on ice, they do nothing in snow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not arguing. I am sorry if you feel like you must do so to make a point that you missed. You have no idea where I have lived or all my experience. I have almost ten years living in NH, not Alaska but we had snow from Sept., To April, in places over 20' deep from drifting. In 20' of drifted snow,  even ice racing spike will do nothing.

 

You find it necessary to talk of snow (in only the spring, apparently), that then melts and refreezes (most call that ice) as if it were snow. It is not. Ride in two feet or fresh snow (not melt and refreeze packed snowmobile tracks) and honestly say that studs make any difference at all.

 

 

Studs are great on ice, they do nothing in snow.

 

I don't think anyone was saying you could ride through 20ft drifts because you have studs. Dense, packed, or hard snow is not ice, ice is shiny, not penetrated by rubber knobs and has a density that is slightly less than water.  I have ridden in two feet of fresh snow on several occasions and you start to see diminishing returns from the studs, it is a perfect application for a studded/bolted paddle tire, which I also use on occasion. The studs always help though because they increase the effective amount of snow being forced backwards by the tire. You are not going to find any snow or ice condition where you will do as well without studs as you would have done with studs.

Perhaps you are thinking of automotive style studs that stick out a mm or two, A good dirtbike stud is carbide tipped and nearly a half inch tall. However, with your vast experience you should already know about this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ice Spikes. Re-read my previous post A lot run a version of 'sheet metal bolts' too though I have never tried them, I ran spikes (on ice) or gummy knobby and sometimes, trials tires in actual snow.

 

Snow is not melt and refreeze (then it is crusty crud), it is not ice. There is a difference. It is not a groomed hard pack. That is just winter riding on a prepared surface. We would of gotten into big trouble riding on the groomed snowmobile track (and even more if it were cross country ski track)

 

Studs/spike do nothing if the snow is more than about 2' deep. You need momentum big knobs (and possibly paddle tires like you mentioned-never tried them) to go anywhere. Though a low pressure trials tire gave a fair amount of float and once you got going, worked well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Studs are for ice, they do nothing in snow.

That's news to me man, I must be doing it all wrong every winter when I ride at least once a week on snow.

4b9209900143c1c41d8274d4a9f7702a_zpsdc0a

photo-30_zpse14a9c3d.jpg

Edited by ckny
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not arguing. I am sorry if you feel like you must do so to make a point that you missed. You have no idea where I have lived or all my experience. I have almost ten years living in NH, not Alaska but we had snow from Sept., To April, in places over 20' deep from drifting. In 20' of drifted snow,  even ice racing spike will do nothing.

 

You find it necessary to talk of snow (in only the spring, apparently), that then melts and refreezes (most call that ice) as if it were snow. It is not. Ride in two feet or fresh snow (not melt and refreeze packed snowmobile tracks) and honestly say that studs make any difference at all.

 

 

Studs are great on ice, they do nothing in snow.

 

Lol, that snow season rivals what we have in than the mountains in CO at 12-13,000'. I call complete BS. When has NH had significant snow in Sept/Oct? Maybe Nov-March I could agree, but exaggerating to make a bad point is not a good way to go. 

 

Also since when can a bike magically float on Pow? A bike weighs 200+lbs and will sink down to where studs do provide traction. Its not like ski's or a snowboard where you can float, you pack down the snow a lot when riding in it. Studs have definitely helped when I've ridden in the winter in snow here in CO. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything over a few feet with a studded knobby gets pretty difficult. Add in the guys in front of you causing giant tracks and it's gets really wild.

Of course you could go without studs and be totally fine in snow...........Wut?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ice Spikes. Re-read my previous post A lot run a version of 'sheet metal bolts' too though I have never tried them, I ran spikes (on ice) or gummy knobby and sometimes, trials tires in actual snow.

 

Snow is not melt and refreeze (then it is crusty crud), it is not ice. There is a difference. It is not a groomed hard pack. That is just winter riding on a prepared surface. We would of gotten into big trouble riding on the groomed snowmobile track (and even more if it were cross country ski track)

 

Studs/spike do nothing if the snow is more than about 2' deep. You need momentum big knobs (and possibly paddle tires like you mentioned-never tried them) to go anywhere. Though a low pressure trials tire gave a fair amount of float and once you got going, worked well.

 

Sorry to break it to you, but in everybody else's world snow is still snow, even if it has a crusty layer, or has been run over, or has been groomed its STILL snow and STUDS still HELP.

 

I'm not even going to start on you saying something as hopelessly inadequate as a trials tire in snow worked best because I have ridden one in snow (at 1 PSI) and will NEVER do that again.

Edited by Wild Alaskan
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's news to me man, I must be doing it all wrong every winter when I ride at least once a week on snow.

4b9209900143c1c41d8274d4a9f7702a_zpsdc0a

photo-30_zpse14a9c3d.jpg

That is what, an inch?

Again, you are riding on a hard pack. You are not riding "THROUGH" snow.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol, that snow season rivals what we have in than the mountains in CO at 12-13,000'. I call complete BS. When has NH had significant snow in Sept/Oct? Maybe Nov-March I could agree, but exaggerating to make a bad point is not a good way to go. 

 

Also since when can a bike magically float on Pow? A bike weighs 200+lbs and will sink down to where studs do provide traction. Its not like ski's or a snowboard where you can float, you pack down the snow a lot when riding in it. Studs have definitely helped when I've ridden in the winter in snow here in CO. 

No, snow starts in Sept. and ends in April in NH. You do not wake up one day and magically have 20' of "DRIFTS'. Again, the OP is talking about going THROUGH snow. Sure, stud or spike may make it better but if the snow is deep, all you can do is go fast and get on top of it.

 

A bike will float on powder just like skis do or whoshisface did riding on water.

 

If you slow and the bike sinks and never hits a surface to 'bite into', you are stuck. Often that requires you to pack a path forward long enough for you to get momentum or drag the bake around and hope the rut you made getting there is packed enough to get you out.

Sorry to break it to you, but in everybody else's world snow is still snow, even if it has a crusty layer, or has been run over, or has been groomed its STILL snow and STUDS still HELP.

 

I'm not even going to start on you saying something as hopelessly inadequate as a trials tire in snow worked best because I have ridden one in snow (at 1 PSI) and will NEVER do that again.

You need to learn to ride faster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...