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Shock Thrust Bearing

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I did a search on here and found no results on it so thought I'd start one.  

 

I used one on my 200 after reading about them several years ago.  Supposedly it makes the action smooth enough that you can feel, and I THINK it does and it makes sense that it would but honestly it's not night and day.  I am a weight weenie and dont like adding stuff to the bike but I did anyway.  To me the real advantage of these things aside from the logic of it all is adjusting sag and of course taking the spring off, it's just flat out easier.

 

I scored a Ti shock spring off a stock 09 yz450 so figured I'd add some weight to it LOL.  I have had Ti before on my wr450.  It was grossly undersprung for me and I paid 50 bucks for one on ebay.  After the first ride on it I found it to be different in a GOOD way. I didnt use the thrust bearing on it since i didnt know about it then.  The Pro's yap a lot about the benny's but they get paid so I discount it a bit.  Many say you do need them on a Ti moreso then conventional, others never mention it.  

 

Anyone want to throw in there .02 cents on them please chime in.

 

http://www.pivotworks.com/TunersTips.aspx?ItemID=37&page=1

 

I think other outfits make the same item.

 

Found this:

(8) As a coil shock is compressed, some of the force is turned into rotational force that wants to twist the spring. This causes binding that can hurt performance. Since fork springs are longer, with more coils, they want to twist a lot more than shock springs. Most modern OEM forks have a built-in thrust washer to prevent binding, but OEM shocks don’t. There are aftermarket needle bearing units available from Pivot Works and Factory Connection that lessen binding.

(9) The weight of a spring is important, because half of its weight is unsprung, further affecting suspension performance. A titanium spring does not have the same dimensions as a steel spring for the same application. Since Ti is lighter and stronger, fewer coils and less material can be used. The result is a significant weight savings and performance gain.

http://motocrossactionmag.com/news/10-things-you-need-to-know-about-shock-springs

Edited by Sycamore

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I removed it from my 12 250sx when I sold it (bought it new sold it last year) and the grease still looked new. I ride on average 4 hours a week, but had a 200 as well that I rode once in awhile at that time.We dont get much rain or mud here and MAYBE that makes a difference but we get a LOT of dust.  I think the orings do their job.  

 

My recommendation would be when you service the shock service the bearing.  I would never take anything apart just to service that bearing.

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I had one on a shock a while back and ended up removing it.  It was a PITA to adjust sag (I usually just grab the coil and yank it around by hand, and the preload ring follows it - couldn't do that).  The o-rings were also a real bitch to get seated in the right spot, and didn't keep dirt out of there at all.  Maybe the sealing has gotten better?

 

I never noticed a difference on a dirt bike shock.  The difference is noticeable on a mtb shock however.

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I had one on a shock a while back and ended up removing it.  It was a PITA to adjust sag (I usually just grab the coil and yank it around by hand, and the preload ring follows it - couldn't do that).  The o-rings were also a real bitch to get seated in the right spot, and didn't keep dirt out of there at all.  Maybe the sealing has gotten better?

 

I never noticed a difference on a dirt bike shock.  The difference is noticeable on a mtb shock however.

wow that absolutely floors me.  Maybe I got lucky but I just spin mine easily to adjust sag.  I should have mine today and installed by tomorrow, hopefully with the same luck.

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wow that absolutely floors me.  Maybe I got lucky but I just spin mine easily to adjust sag.  I should have mine today and installed by tomorrow, hopefully with the same luck.

 

You spin the collar by hand?  What bike?  A KYB collar would tear the hell out of my hand if I tried that.

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no I loosen the ring and either easily adjust it with a tool or do it by hand.  Havent tried KYB, but my 250sx and 200 were a piece of cake, without it not so much.  Hope its the same for kyb.

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no I loosen the ring and either easily adjust it with a tool or do it by hand.  Havent tried KYB, but my 250sx and 200 were a piece of cake, without it not so much.  Hope its the same for kyb.

 

Ah, yeah, totally different story.  Those rings are nice and tall and generally kinder to the hands.  The KYB rings are thinner with ugly casting corners on each end that would prohibit such things.

 

You should be able to spin it by hand with the weight off the rear. Loosen the top nut, then grab the spring by your hand and turn.

 

Yup, that's what I do now.  If there's a thrust bearing on the end of the spring though, it's not going to turn the preload collar with it.  You'll just spin the spring.

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slopped some grease in the bearing, orings wanted to come out but only because of the excess grease.   Once that was done I degreased the outside of it put it on and tightened up the ring.  Yeah the biting edges on the ring did suck over my ktm plastic ones and made worse evidently by my tuner.  I'll be replacing those things soon.

 

Still while on the bench it was pretty easy to tighten the ring with the tool I had.  The bearing definitely made it easier.  I had a new Ti spring so measurements were of no help so I cinched it down to what I thought was reasonable and put it on the bike.

 

I was very close but did have to adjust it and found it not all that easy but still easier to adjust with the bearing installed.  

 

I took a ride on it saturday and since I had a different spring and a Ti one at that it is very difficult to say the bearing is all that.  But IMO the concept makes sense and adjusting it is easier.  I have one ktm with it and one without and the one with is hands down easier.  It's a keep for me.

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At the risk of sounding ignorant, what is the purpose of the bearing?

from the original post:

 

Found this:

(8) As a coil shock is compressed, some of the force is turned into rotational force that wants to twist the spring. This causes binding that can hurt performance. Since fork springs are longer, with more coils, they want to twist a lot more than shock springs. Most modern OEM forks have a built-in thrust washer to prevent binding, but OEM shocks don’t. There are aftermarket needle bearing units available from Pivot Works and Factory Connection that lessen binding.

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Got it! Can't believe it was in the original post! Now I am embarrassed but a little less ignorant, Thanks :-)

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Got it! Can't believe it was in the original post! Now I am embarrassed but a little less ignorant, Thanks :-)

Yeah you should be..nobody ever does that!!  :)  No worries I do it all the time too. 

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